Contributors

THOMAS W. CHAPMAN serves as chief executive officer of The George Washington University Hospital and senior associate vice president for network development of The George Washington University Medical Center. He is responsible for developing programs to extend the Medical Center's urban health initiative and provider network. At the time of the lecture, Mr. Chapman was president of the Greater Southeast Healthcare System in Washington, D.C.. He is currently the national program officer for Opening Doors, a program aimed at reducing sociocultural barriers to health care, cosponsored by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation.

MARK R. CHASSIN was commissioner of health for New York state from 1992–1994. He currently is an independent consultant. Prior to being named commissioner, Dr. Chassin served as senior vice president of Value Health Sciences, Inc., a health services research and consulting firm that develops guidelines and software for health care quality assessment and utilization review. From 1981–1989, he was a senior project director for the RAND Corporation. While at RAND, Dr. Chassin served as a principal investigator in a pioneering research study that evaluated geographic differences in the use of health services as an indicator of possible inappropriate use.



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Preparing for a Changing Healthcare Marketplace: Lessons from the Field Contributors THOMAS W. CHAPMAN serves as chief executive officer of The George Washington University Hospital and senior associate vice president for network development of The George Washington University Medical Center. He is responsible for developing programs to extend the Medical Center's urban health initiative and provider network. At the time of the lecture, Mr. Chapman was president of the Greater Southeast Healthcare System in Washington, D.C.. He is currently the national program officer for Opening Doors, a program aimed at reducing sociocultural barriers to health care, cosponsored by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. MARK R. CHASSIN was commissioner of health for New York state from 1992–1994. He currently is an independent consultant. Prior to being named commissioner, Dr. Chassin served as senior vice president of Value Health Sciences, Inc., a health services research and consulting firm that develops guidelines and software for health care quality assessment and utilization review. From 1981–1989, he was a senior project director for the RAND Corporation. While at RAND, Dr. Chassin served as a principal investigator in a pioneering research study that evaluated geographic differences in the use of health services as an indicator of possible inappropriate use.

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Preparing for a Changing Healthcare Marketplace: Lessons from the Field THOMAS L. DELBANCO is director of the Division of General Medicine and Primary Care at Beth Israel Hospital, associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, and director of the Picker/Commonwealth Program for Patient-Centered Care. Dr. Delbanco came to Boston in 1971 and created a nationally-recognized hospital-based primary care practice and teaching program, Healthcare Associates, which provides more than 45,000 patient visits annually and serves more than 500 patients with HIV infection. Dr. Delbanco is a past president of the Society of General Internal Medicine and a former Robert Wood Johnson Health Policy Fellow. STANLEY B. JONES is director of The George Washington University Health Insurance Reform Project. In addition to his duties there, he is a consultant to private foundations on competitive private health insurance markets and the roles of public policy in improving these markets. He was a founding partner of the Washington consulting firm, Health Policy Alternatives, Inc., and has served as vice president for Washington representation of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association, as well as staff director of the U.S. Senate's Subcommittee on Health. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine and author of many articles and papers on private health insurance, structural reform of the health system, and health care competition. SIMEON A. RUBENSTEIN is the medical director of corporate health, Group Health Cooperative of Puget Sound and the associate director for policy development. He has been with Group Health for 15 years in a variety of positions and has chaired its Technology Assessment Committee. Dr. Rubenstein's clinical background is in cardiovascular disease. He is currently a clinical professor in the Department of Medicine, at the University of Washington, a fellow in the American College of Cardiology, and past president of the American Heart Association, Washington state Affiliate. DAVID B. SNOW, JR., is executive vice president of the Oxford Health Plans and as such is responsible for the marketing, sales, and medical delivery systems of this 180,000 member managed care company. Oxford currently offers its health plans to persons in New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut. Prior to joining Oxford Health Plans, Mr. Snow was founder and president of Managed Healthcare Systems, Inc. (MHS),

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Preparing for a Changing Healthcare Marketplace: Lessons from the Field a managed healthcare company committed to the development and operation of Medicaid managed care programs. As part of his work at MHS, Mr. Snow directed a landmark development effort in which the nation's largest Medicaid HMO (over 82,000 enrollees in Philadelphia) was designed, implemented, and operational within a four-month time frame. Prior to MHS, he worked for U.S. Healthcare, another leading national managed care organization. LOIS WATTMAN is vice president of public policy for Medica, a not-for-profit HMO with 500,000 enrollees including 140,000 Medicare and Medicaid recipients. Prior to assuming this position, she served for five years as legislative counsel for Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota. Before joining Blue Cross and Blue Shield, Ms. Wattman served as director of special projects for the Minnesota Medical Association and as legislative assistant to then state senator Gerry Sikorski. Ms. Wattman has been active in health care reform initiatives for the past several years. She currently serves as an alternate to the Minnesota Health Care Commission and served on the Department of Health's Antitrust Advisory Committee. ALAN R. WEIL, at the time of the lecture, was health policy advisor to Colorado Governor Roy Romer. In this role, he advised the Governor during the critical national debate on health care reform. Additionally, Mr. Weil is the former project director of a study of ColoradoCare, a proposal for comprehensive reform of health care in Colorado. He is currently the executive director of Colorado's Department of Health Care Policy and Financing and a highly respected expert on the role of states in a restructured health care environment.