Appendix A

Biographical Sketches of Subcommittee Members

Hal W. Hendrick, chair, is professor emeritus of human factors, Institute of Safety and Systems Management, University of Southern California. He has a B.A. degree in psychology from Ohio Wesleyan University and a M.S. degree in human factors and Ph.D. in industrial psychology from Purdue University. He served as professor and dean, College of Systems Science, University of Denver; professor and interim executive director, Institute of Safety and Systems Management, and chair, Human Factors Department, University of Southern California; chief of behavioral sciences, Defense Race Relations Institute; associate professor of psychology, U.S. Air Force Academy; and human performance engineer, U.S. Air Force Systems Command. He also served as an officer in the U.S. Air Force. Dr. Hendrick was a member of the National Research Council (NRC) Committee on Assessment of Crew Size and Maritime Safety and is currently a member of the Committee on Human Performance, Organizational Systems, and Maritime Safety. Dr. Hendrick has published extensively. He is the immediate past president of the International Ergonomics Association, past president and a current director of the Board of Certification in Professional Ergonomics, and immediate past president and current executive committee member of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. He is a charter member and fellow of the American Psychological Society; a fellow of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society; and a fellow of the American Psychological Association. Dr. Hendrick also maintains a number of other professional affiliations.

Robert G. Bea is professor of civil and environmental engineering at the University of California, Berkeley. He has 43 years of experience as a marine coastal and offshore engineering industry consultant and research scientist. He has successfully developed and implemented more than 40 significant industry- and government-funded cooperative research programs. Mr. Bea, a former member of the NRC Marine Board, has served on numerous national and international research and advisory committees, including seven NRC committees. He is currently a member of the Committee on Human Performance, Organizational Systems and Maritime Safety and a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He conducts research on human and organizational factors and on design, construction, and operation of marine structures. Mr. Bea has a B.S. degree in civil engineering and a M.S. degree in engineering from the University of Florida.

Stephen A. Frasher is senior vice president of operations at Midland Enterprises, Inc. He has a M.B.A. degree from New York University with distinction in quantitative analysis/operations research. He also has a B.S. degree in aeronautical engineering. Mr. Frasher was previously division superintendent at Consolidated Rail Corporation. He is a member of the River Industry Executive Task Force, Towing Safety Advisory Committee advisor on licensing, member of the American Waterways Operators (AWO) Responsible



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 51
ADVANCING THE PRINCIPLES OF THE PREVENTION THROUGH PEOPLE PROGRAM Appendix A Biographical Sketches of Subcommittee Members Hal W. Hendrick, chair, is professor emeritus of human factors, Institute of Safety and Systems Management, University of Southern California. He has a B.A. degree in psychology from Ohio Wesleyan University and a M.S. degree in human factors and Ph.D. in industrial psychology from Purdue University. He served as professor and dean, College of Systems Science, University of Denver; professor and interim executive director, Institute of Safety and Systems Management, and chair, Human Factors Department, University of Southern California; chief of behavioral sciences, Defense Race Relations Institute; associate professor of psychology, U.S. Air Force Academy; and human performance engineer, U.S. Air Force Systems Command. He also served as an officer in the U.S. Air Force. Dr. Hendrick was a member of the National Research Council (NRC) Committee on Assessment of Crew Size and Maritime Safety and is currently a member of the Committee on Human Performance, Organizational Systems, and Maritime Safety. Dr. Hendrick has published extensively. He is the immediate past president of the International Ergonomics Association, past president and a current director of the Board of Certification in Professional Ergonomics, and immediate past president and current executive committee member of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. He is a charter member and fellow of the American Psychological Society; a fellow of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society; and a fellow of the American Psychological Association. Dr. Hendrick also maintains a number of other professional affiliations. Robert G. Bea is professor of civil and environmental engineering at the University of California, Berkeley. He has 43 years of experience as a marine coastal and offshore engineering industry consultant and research scientist. He has successfully developed and implemented more than 40 significant industry- and government-funded cooperative research programs. Mr. Bea, a former member of the NRC Marine Board, has served on numerous national and international research and advisory committees, including seven NRC committees. He is currently a member of the Committee on Human Performance, Organizational Systems and Maritime Safety and a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He conducts research on human and organizational factors and on design, construction, and operation of marine structures. Mr. Bea has a B.S. degree in civil engineering and a M.S. degree in engineering from the University of Florida. Stephen A. Frasher is senior vice president of operations at Midland Enterprises, Inc. He has a M.B.A. degree from New York University with distinction in quantitative analysis/operations research. He also has a B.S. degree in aeronautical engineering. Mr. Frasher was previously division superintendent at Consolidated Rail Corporation. He is a member of the River Industry Executive Task Force, Towing Safety Advisory Committee advisor on licensing, member of the American Waterways Operators (AWO) Responsible

OCR for page 51
ADVANCING THE PRINCIPLES OF THE PREVENTION THROUGH PEOPLE PROGRAM Carrier Program, and AWO industry quality action team leader for the Marine Employee Fatalities Committee. He is past chair of the Ohio River Ice Committee. Leslie J. Hughes is executive director of the North Pacific Fishing Vessel Owners ' Association (NPFVOA) Vessel Safety Program. Twelve years ago, she worked with industry and the U.S. Coast Guard to develop and implement the Vessel Safety Program. The Vessel Safety Program, regarded as the model safety training program for the U.S. commercial fisherman, is conducted by the NPFVOA, a nonprofit association dedicated to safety education and training for all types of fishermen and other mariners. Since 1985, NPFVOA has been responsible for training approximately 16,000 mariners. Its membership consists of approximately 200 vessels and 150 support businesses and individuals representing a wide range of commercial marine operators. Actively involved in various aspects of the commercial fishing industry for 22 years, Ms. Hughes has worked with naval architects, boat builders, and maritime attorneys. She was assistant editor for the first edition of the Vessel Safety Manual, published in 1986. Now in its fourth edition, the Vessel Safety Manual is the operational standard for vessel safety in the country. In addition, Ms. Hughes is a member of a number of industry groups and received the Jerry Jurkovich Award from the National Marine Fisheries Service for promoting safety at sea and helping bridge communication between industry and government. She is presently serving her second term on the Coast Guard's Commercial Fishing Industry Vessel Advisory Committee. She also serves on the boards of directors for the U.S. Marine Safety Association and the Odyssey Contemporary Museum. Edward V. Kelly is vice president and special assistant to the president of the American Maritime Officers, a labor union that supplies engineers, mates, and radio officers to U.S. flag merchant ships. He is also vice president of Maritime Affairs and chairman of the Merchant Marine Committee of the Navy League of the United States, the U.S. delegate to the International Maritime Organization, and past president of the Kings Point Club of Washington, D.C. Mr. Kelly is a graduate of the United States Merchant Marine Academy (USMMA). He served in the U.S. Merchant Marine and on active duty in the U.S. Navy as a project manager and project engineer with the Bureau of Naval Weapons and on sea duty aboard the USS Ranger. He later served 32 years in the U.S. Naval Reserve. Mr. Kelly also has worked for Lockheed Aircraft, the Transportation Institute, and Dynalectron Corporation. He is a member of the National Defense Executive Reserve of the Maritime Administration; the Sealift Panel of the National Defense Transportation Association; the Sealift Panel of the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers; and the Governmental Affairs Committee of the USMMA Alumni Association. He is currently a member of the NRC Committee on Human Performance, Organizational Systems, and Maritime Safety. Najmedin Meshkati is associate professor of human factors and ergonomics and the associate executive director at the Institute of Safety and Systems Management (ISSM), University of Southern California (USC). He is responsible for the ISSM Professional Programs that include the 46-year old USC aviation safety, transportation safety, process safety management, and occupational safety and health continuing education programs. He is also an associate professor of civil/environmental engineering and industrial and systems engineering at USC.

OCR for page 51
ADVANCING THE PRINCIPLES OF THE PREVENTION THROUGH PEOPLE PROGRAM He is a certified professional ergonomist and is also an adjunct scholar at the Department of Human Work Sciences and the Center for Ergonomics of Developing Countries, Lulea University of Technology, Sweden. Before joining USC in 1985, he was project director for Decision Dynamics Corporation, research engineer at SKC Research, Inc., and lectured at the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, California. Dr. Meshkati is an elected fellow of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society was a recipient of the Presidential Young Investigator Award from the National Science Foundation in 1989. His analysis of the Bhopal disaster earned him the 1988 American Society for Training and Development International Research Award. He is also the recipient of the 1985 Cooperation and Appreciation Award from the Ministry of Manpower, Government of Indonesia. He is the co-editor and a primary author of Human Mental Workload, North-Holland, 1988. His technical reports and articles on safety, health, and environment; risk management, ergonomics and safety of petrochemical plants and nuclear power stations; and aviation safety have been published, disseminated, and cited by different United Nations specialized agencies such as the United Nations Industrial Development Organization, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, the International Labour Office, and the International Civil Aviation Organization. Dr. Meshkati received a B.S. degree in industrial engineering simultaneously with a B.A. degree in political science and economics in 1976. He received a M.S. degree in engineering management in 1978 and a Ph.D. degree in industrial and systems engineering in 1983 from USC. He is currently a member of the Committee on Human Performance, Organizational Systems, and Maritime Safety. Charles R. Pillsbury is an experienced master with over 28 years in the maritime industry, including 10 years as master, and an extensive background in maritime education that includes teaching, administration, consulting, and simulator design. He is currently serving as executive director of the Maritime Institute of Technology and Graduate Studies (MITAGS). Captain Pillsbury has an unlimited ocean master's license with radar endorsement and additional first class pilot's endorsement for steam and motor vessels of any gross tons for Southwest Alaska. He served as master of Sealand D9, D7, and C4 class vessels in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans and the Gulf of Alaska and commanded the USNS Capella in the Fast Sealift Squadron for the Military Sealift Command. Until his recent appointment as executive director of MITAGS, he served as master of the M.V. SeaLand Tacoma. From 1974 through 1991, Captain Pillsbury served as instructor in various programs at MITAGS, including radar, the license advancement program, computers, and meteorology, and also served as department head of the Marine Cargo Operations Program. Captain Pillsbury participated in the redesign of the 8-own ship radar simulator, was a member of the group that designed the liquid natural gas simulator, and assisted in the design and implementation of the full-mission bridge simulators for MITAGS. He was selected as a training consultant for the International Maritime Organization of the United Nations and for the Algerian government. Captain Pillsbury is currently a member of the U.S. Safety of Life at Sea working groups and a member of the U.S. Coast Guard Navigation and Safety Advisory Committee. He has a B.S. degree in navigation and marine transportation at the United States Merchant Marine Academy at Kings Point, New York, in 1968, and a M.S. degree with honors in adult and continuing

OCR for page 51
ADVANCING THE PRINCIPLES OF THE PREVENTION THROUGH PEOPLE PROGRAM education from The Johns Hopkins University in 1980. He is currently a member of the Committee on Human Performance, Organizational Systems, and Maritime Safety. James H. Sanborn is president of Polaris Associates, a marine consultancy that provides services in compliance systems, marine technology applications, marine labor strategy, marine simulation development, strategic planning, and marine market analysis. He has an M.B.A. degree from the University of Pennsylvania Wharton School and a B.S. degree from the United States Merchant Marine Academy. Mr. Sanborn is retired executive vice president of Maritrans, Inc., and former member of the board of directors of that company. During his tenure at Maritrans, he provided oversight to newly structured business units and was responsible for strategic planning, business development, asset allocation, and external affairs as well as earlier business unit and operational leadership. He was instrumental in launching one of the nation's first successful oil spill contingency planning and emergency response businesses. Mr. Sanborn has held several other positions with marine transportation firms and is a member of several industry, community, educational, and governmental organizations. He is a former chair and director of the American Waterways Operators. In addition, Mr. Sanborn served as a line officer in the U.S. Navy during 1959–1960 and subsequently as a deck officer in the U.S. Merchant Marine. He served in the U.S. Naval Reserve in several Sealift units with increasing responsibility, including command. He retired with the grade of captain after 29 years of service. Steven T. Scalzo, is senior vice president for operations of Foss Maritime Company, responsible for a fleet of 100 tugs and 100 barges. He previously held positions at the United States Merchant Marine Academy and the Chevron Shipping Company. Mr. Scalzo is affiliated with several maritime-related activities, such as the U.S. Coast Guard Towing Advisory Committee, and the board chair of the Clean Sound Cooperative, Inc. He is past chair of the Seattle Chamber of Commerce Maritime Committee and of the American Waterway Operators Regulatory Committee. Mr. Scalzo is also the recipient of the Distinguished Service Award, the highest civilian honor given by the Department of Transportation and U.S. Coast Guard for outstanding service to the government. Mr. Scalzo received a B.S. degree from the United States Merchant Marine Academy and a Master of Law and Commerce degree from the Law and M.B.A. Program at Gonzaga University. He is currently a member of the NRC Marine Board. Stephen F. Schmidt is retired senior vice president, operations/engineering, for the American President Lines (APL) where he had overall responsibility for the APL fleet of 23 U.S.-flag containerships, plus various foreign-flag feeder vessels. He has a B.S. degree in marine transportation from the United States Merchant Marine Academy, then sailed as third and second officer aboard U.S. merchant vessels for three years before returning ashore, where he had various management positions for Sea-Land Service in the United States and Europe. After moving to APL, he was director of terminal operations, vice president of Asia, and vice president of logistics for APL and American President Intermodal before assuming responsibility for the company's operations and engineering activity in 1991.