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ADVANCES AND SUCCESSES Over the last 10 years, it has become clear that research on the issues surrounding human-computer interaction is worth doing. The design of the human- computer interface makes a marked difference in users' performance. Software products exist that embody well- designed interfaces derived from human factors input: the Xerox STAR, Apple LISA, and MACINTOSH work stations and the Rolm and IBM mail systems are examples. In addition, major changes in the design of the telephone directory assistance system, as well as original designs of telecommunication control devices, were a result of human factors studies e Human factors research has also shown the usefulness of some important generic display and control devices: the partitioning of screens into windows, icons for the control of operations and the display of objects, better help messages, and better defined response and function keys. In addition, more is known about users' limitations and adaptability. Human factors design is also influencing documentation and training for software use (Felker, 1980). Because software is more available to a variety of users, there is an increased awareness by the public of the need to make software easy to learn and use. 21