3

Published Historical Articles

The annotations were prepared by project staff, based on available abstracts.

CITATIONS FROM JOURNALS

75 years of caring. US Navy Med 1983; 74(3) : 14–7.

No abstract available.

Anonymous. Nurses in the Vietnam War. Nebraska Nurse 1995; 28(2) : 1.

No abstract available.

Arnowitz J. First female IDC delivers health care. Navy Med 1988; 79(6) : 7–8.

No abstract available.

Barger J. Origin of flight nursing in the U.S. Army Air Forces. Aviat Space Environ Med 1979; 50(11) : 1176–8.

This historical study traces the origin of flight nursing in the U.S. Army Air Forces from 1937, when the need for specially designated flight nurses could not be justified, until 1942, when flight nursing in the U.S. Army Air Forces became a reality.



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 69
Military Nursing Research: Bibliographies 3 Published Historical Articles The annotations were prepared by project staff, based on available abstracts. CITATIONS FROM JOURNALS 75 years of caring. US Navy Med 1983; 74(3) : 14–7. No abstract available. Anonymous. Nurses in the Vietnam War. Nebraska Nurse 1995; 28(2) : 1. No abstract available. Arnowitz J. First female IDC delivers health care. Navy Med 1988; 79(6) : 7–8. No abstract available. Barger J. Origin of flight nursing in the U.S. Army Air Forces. Aviat Space Environ Med 1979; 50(11) : 1176–8. This historical study traces the origin of flight nursing in the U.S. Army Air Forces from 1937, when the need for specially designated flight nurses could not be justified, until 1942, when flight nursing in the U.S. Army Air Forces became a reality.

OCR for page 69
Military Nursing Research: Bibliographies Barger J. U.S. Army Air Forces flight nurses: training and pioneer flight. Aviat Space Environ Med 1980; 51(4) : 414–6. This historical study highlights the training of the first Army flight nurses and the participation of one Army nurse, Lt. Elsie S. Ott, in a pioneer air evacuation flight from India to the U.S. Barger J. Rivalry for the sky: a prelude to the development of the flight nurse program in the U.S. Army Air Forces. Aviat Space Environ Med 1985; 56(1) : 73–8. In this study, historical methodology was employed to examine letters and reports of the Aerial Nurse Corps of America, the American Red Cross, the American Nurses' Association, and the U.S. Army. Barger J. Strategic aeromedical evacuation: the inaugural flight. Aviat Space Environ Med 1986; 57(6) : 613–6. This historical study concentrates on the lessons learned in the form of recommendations made by Lt. Elsie S. Ott, as a result of an Air Transport Command flight from Karachi, Pakistan (then part of India), to Washington, D.C., in January 1943. Barger J. Coping behaviors of U.S. Army flight nurses in World War II: an oral history. Aviat Space Environ Med 1991; 62(2) : 153–7. This study addressed how flight nurses in the U.S. Army Air Forces in World War II coped with war. The purpose was to analyze data obtained from oral histories of 25 flight nurses who served in World War II. Barger J. Preparing for war: lessons learned from U.S. Army flight nurses of World War II. Aviat Space Environ Med 1991; 62(8) : 772–5. As part of a larger study of how military nurses cope with war, 25 former U.S. Army flight nurses of World War II were interviewed to learn how they coped with wartime situations they perceived as taxing or exceeding their resources. The purpose of this paper was to describe those aspects of wartime nursing that flight nurses would like to have changed and, subsequently, to learn what advice they would offer today's flight nurses. Barker ER. Caregivers as casualties. West J Nurs Res 1989; 11(5) : 628–31. No abstract available. Beeber LS. To be one of the boys: aftershocks of the World War I nursing experience. ANS Adv Nurs Sci 1990; 12(4) : 32–43. This study examines the value of confrontation with being different as an impetus to growth. The study population comprised nurses deployed during

OCR for page 69
Military Nursing Research: Bibliographies World War I who were removed from their structured professional culture and thrust into the unfamiliar world of men at war. Bruce GL. Jones SA. Flight Nurse Section—past, present, future. Aviat Space Environ Med 1979; 50(5) : 503–7. No abstract available. Campinha J. An historical look at the development of nursing in the Veterans Administration Nursing Service. Mil Med 1985; 150(1) : 1–5. No abstract available. Carnegie ME. Nurses and war. Black nurses at the front. Am J Nurs 1984; 84(10) : 1250–2. No abstract available. Chow RK. Hope GS. Nelson EA. Sokoloski JL. Wilson RA. Historical perspectives of the U.S. Air Force, Army, Navy, Public Health Service, and Veterans Administration Nursing Services. Mil Med 1978; 143(7) : 457–63. No abstract available. Culpepper MM. Adams PG. Nursing in the Civil War. Am J Nurs 1988; 88(7) : 981–4. No abstract available. Curtis DE. Nurses and war. The way it was. Am J Nurs 1984; 84(10) : 1253–4. No abstract available. Delamothe T. Modern medicine and war: didn't we do well? Br Med J (Clin Res Ed) 1988; 296(6625) : 852–4. No abstract available. Donahue MP. Reflections on the changing image of nurses in wartime Caduceus 1995; 11(1) : 53–8. No abstract available. Frank ME. Piemonte RL. The Army Nurse Corps. A decade of change. Am J Nurs 1985; 85(9) : 985–8. No abstract available.

OCR for page 69
Military Nursing Research: Bibliographies Ginsberg MK. Years of nursing research at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research. Mil Med 1967; 132(3) : 219–23. No abstract available. Glass LK. The Naval Reserve Nurse Corps: the first fifty years, 1908–1958. Caduceus 1995 ; 11(1) : 35–52. No abstract available. Gurney C. Military nursing: 211 years of commitment to the American soldier. Imprint 1987; 34(5) : 36–41. No abstract available. Haritos DJ. The U.S. Air Force Nurse Corps documents its history. J Nurs Hist 1985; 1(1) : 18–29. No abstract available. Iveson-Iveson J. History of nursing in the Air Force: string, sealing wax and individual daring. Nurs Mirror 1981; 153(3) : 27–8. No abstract available. Kalisch PA. How Army nurses became officers. Nurs Res 1976:164–7 No abstract available. Kalisch PA. Weavers of scientific patient care: development of nursing research in the U.S. armed forces. Nurs Res 1977; 26(4) : 253–71. No abstract available. Kennedy TE. The evolution of nursing research in the Army Nurse Corps. Mil Med 1994; 159(11) : 680–3. This paper describes the development of the nursing research program by the Army Nurse Corps (ANC) within the Army Medical Department (AMEDD) from its earliest stages through the present. It discusses the organizational structure of nursing research within the ANC and the leadership innovations being implemented to make nursing research responsive to the needs of AMEDD into the next century. Lee G. History of flight nursing. J Emerg Nurs 1987; 13(4) : 212–8. No abstract available.

OCR for page 69
Military Nursing Research: Bibliographies Leone LP. The U.S. Cadet Nurse Corps. Imprint 1976; 23(1) : 20–2. No abstract available. McGookin D. Army nurses—90 years of service. Am Nurse 1991; 23(4) : 15. No abstract available. Norman EM. American military nurses in wartime and the impact of their experiences on peacetime nursing practice. Caduceus 1995; 11(1) : 23–34. No abstract available. Palmer PN. Wars leave indelible marks on the nursing profession [editorial]. AORN J 1991; 53(3) : 657–8. No abstract available. Polskin LJ. The forging of the caduceus from DODONA to DOD: a tribute to the medical departments of the U.S. armed services. Mil Med 1978; 143(12) : 844–55. No abstract available. Popiel ES. The Army Nurse Corps: try to remember our heritage. Colo Nurse 1967; 67(2) : 5–9. No abstract available. Popiel ES. The Navy Nurse Corps. Colo Nurse 1967; 67(4) : 5–7. No abstract available. Ravella P. A memorable aeromedical evacuation mission. Aviat Space Environ Med 1994; 65(6) : 577. No abstract available. Relating to our roots: the history of Air Force nurses' flight wings. Nurs Success Today 1985; 2(6) : 40. No abstract available. Ross C. Desert Storm nursing. Aviat Space Environ Med 1995; 66(6) : 596–7. No abstract available.

OCR for page 69
Military Nursing Research: Bibliographies Sarnecky MT. A history of volunteerism and patriotism in the Army Nurse Corps. Mil Med 1989; 154(7) : 358–64. This historical study examines the motivation to serve demonstrated by Army nurses from colonial times to the Vietnam War era. The analysis focuses on procurement methods aimed at obtaining nursing support that have been employed by the Army throughout its 210-year history. Sarnecky MT. Inventing nursing research. Nurs Res 1993; 42(5) : 318–9. No abstract available. Sarnecky MT, Gurney CA. 1991 New York–Tidewater Chapters History of Military Medicine Essay Award recipient. A snapshot of an Army nurse leader in the great war. Mil Med 1992; 157(4) : 169–74. No abstract available. Schimmenti C, Darmody MA. Taking flight. Am J Nurs 1987; 87(11) : 1420–3. No abstract available. Sheehy SB. The evolution of air medical transport. J Emerg Nurs 1995; 21(2) : 146–8. No abstract available. Skinner RE. The U.S. flight nurse: an annotated historical bibliography. Aviat Space Environ Med 1981; 52(11) : 707–12. The original concept of the specially trained flight nurse was first enunciated in 1932, but it was not until 1943 that the first group of such nurses graduated from training for U.S. Army air evacuation work in World War II. This is a brief history and extensive annotated bibliography for those who wish to delve further into flight nurse history. Skinner RE. The U.S. flight nurse: a supplementary bibliography. Aviat Space Environ Med 1983; 54(8) : 735–7. This supplement to “The U.S. flight nurse: an annotated historical bibliography” (Aviat Space Environ Med 1981;52:707–12) provides further historical information on the flight nurse, with particular emphasis on the late Lauretta M. Schimmoler and the U.S. naval flight nurse. Smith LS. History of American military nursing. Adv Clin Care 1991; 6(6) : 31–2, 36. No abstract available.

OCR for page 69
Military Nursing Research: Bibliographies U.S. Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine celebrates 50th anniversary. Aerosp Med 1968; 39(3) : 328–31. No abstract available. CITATIONS FROM TECHNICAL REPORTS Lensing SB. History of the Development of the Navy Medical Department's Workload Management System for Nursing. Final Report Jan–Aug 87. Naval School of Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD. 1987. NSHS-5-87. 53p. This report provides a historical review of nurse staffing as a management function and describes patient classification, a concept underlying many staffing methodologies. A chronological history and analysis of the nurse staffing research conducted by the Naval School of Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland, is presented. McCall SC. Lessons Learned by Army Nurses in Combat: A Historical Review. Study Project. Army War College, Carlisle Barracks, PA. 1993. 54p. This study provides a historical review of observations and experiences of nurses during combat. A trend-line analysis covering conflicts from World War II through Operation Desert Storm was used, based on four categories: training, conditions, innovations, and redeployment. Poland EA. Effect of Permanent Change of Station (PCS) Policy Changes on Nurse Corps Career Development. Master's thesis. Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA. 1984. 85p. The increasing cost within the Navy of permanent change of station assignments, as it pertains to three types of PCS moves (operational, rotational, and training), were studied. Five network representations encompassing the two U.S. Navy Nurse Corps career pathways—management and clinical practice—were constructed with respect to these three types of PCS moves. Reiter BL. History of Aeromedical Evacuation and the Emerging System of Tomorrow. Research Report Aug 92–Apr 93. Industrial College of the Armed Forces, Washington, DC. 1993. NDU-ICAF-93-S64. 38p. This paper explores the early days of patient evacuation and the beginning of formalized military training for nurses in aeromedical evacuation during World War II. It then outlines the primary aircraft used for aeromedical evacuation and the structure of these units before and after the Air Force Reserve reorganization, in June 1992. Finally, it examines the critical issues of recruiting and retention, and looks at reserve requirements, the impact of

OCR for page 69
Military Nursing Research: Bibliographies personnel time constraints, and the training time involved in accomplishing initial aeromedical evacuation qualification. Richie SI. Echoes from the Past—Lessons for the Future: A Vietnam Oral History. Study project. Army War College, Carlisle Barracks, PA. 1988. 53p. This paper provides an overview of a 1-year tour in Vietnam through interviews with seven active-duty Army nurses who shared their most vivid memories, demanding experiences, and coping strategies of their year in Vietnam. Starting with their notification that they were going to Vietnam and continuing through their homecoming and aftereffects, topics include the following: preparation; in country; relationships; hootches, huts, and home; incoming rounds; incoming casualties; relief; expectants; goodbyes; and closure. Ryan MGG. Can I Hear You. A Descriptive Longitudinal Study of Hearing Levels of Aeromedical Technicians and Flight Nurses. Master's thesis. Air Force Institute of Technology, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH. 1980. AFIT-CI-80-51T. 47p. This study was designed to describe the hearing levels of both flight nurses and aeromedical technicians over time. A computer printout was received from the Air Force Hearing Conservation Registry, which depicted a 3-year period as the longest consecutive period with a sufficient population. CITATIONS FROM DISSERTATIONS ABSTRACTS INTERNATIONAL Barger, Judith. The History of Flight Nursing in the U.S. Army Air Forces During World War II. M.S.N. thesis, The Catholic University of America 1977. This historical study traces the origin of the flight nurse program in the U.S. Army Air Forces, describes the education and training of the Army flight nurses during the war, and depicts the duties of these nurses by recounting their participation in air evacuation missions during World War II. Bianchi, Linda Noreen. U.S. Army Nurses in the China-Burma-India Theater of World War II, 1942–1945 (Army Nurses). Ph.D. diss., University of Illinois at Chicago 1990. This historical study explored the living, working, social, and administrative environments of the Army nurse who served in the China-Burma-India theater from 1942 to 1945. Included in the data analysis and synthesis were such aspects as their reactions to caring for unfamiliar tropical diseases; relation

OCR for page 69
Military Nursing Research: Bibliographies ships with the commanding officers, unit chief nurses, and theater chief nurse; activities during off-duty hours and how this helped them adjust to their environment; the role of the theater chief nurse in restoring morale among the nurses; and nurses' reactions to returning to civilian life. Gaskins, Susanne Teepe. G.I. Nurses at War: Gender and Professionalization in the Army Nurse Corps During World War II. Ph.D. diss., University of California, Riverside 1994. This historical study addresses the influence of gender as a factor in subordination in military nursing. Hicks, Lurline. A Review of the Literature and Related Research: A Descriptive Study of Black Nurses, the Challenge of Needed Change (Nurses). Ed.D. diss., Wayne State University 1990. This historical study examines the role of black nurses as it developed historically. Johnson, Katherine Burger. Called to Serve: American Nurses Go to War, 1914–1918. M.A. thesis, University of Louisville 1993. This thesis explores the efforts of the more than 10,000 American women who served overseas as nurses and nurses' aides from 1914 to 1918, caring for soldiers and civilians. Mill, Betty Temples. Nursing and the Evolution of the Baccalaureate Graduate Nurse: An Historical Study of Foundations, Education and Perceptions—Implications for the Future of Health Care. Ph.D. diss., Boston College 1989. This dissertation explores how the baccalaureate graduate nurse evolved and the implications of that evolution for the future of health care. It synthesizes a large body of research and examines the effects of multiple variables on nursing and the baccalaureate graduate nurse. Miller, Jan Lucille. An Opportunity to Succeed: A Biographical Analysis of the Life and Career of Brigadier General Anna Mae McCabe Hays. M.A.I.S. thesis, Pan American University 1990. This study highlights the parallels between the career of Brigadier General Anna Mae McCabe Hays in the Army Nurse Corps and the changes and opportunities provided to all women in the Army Nurse Corps and throughout the Army.

OCR for page 69
Military Nursing Research: Bibliographies Moss, Jean Russel. Walking the Tightrope: The Story of Nursing as Told by Nineteenth-Century Nursing Journals. Ph.D. diss., The University of Iowa 1987 This study of published nursing material is an attempt to identify and describe the reference groups and cultural norms that nurses used as models; the way in which the beliefs, values, and practices of these groups were modified to meet nursing's unique characteristics and needs; and how this new formation was articulated to its members through nursing journals. Murphey, Carol Jean. The Nurse's Liberation: An Evolutionary Epistemological Paradigm for Nursing. Ed.D. diss., The University of North Carolina at Greensboro 1987. This study offers an evolutionary epistemological paradigm in an effort to explain the evolution of theoretical approaches in nursing as society has become more technologically sophisticated. It explores the evolution of nursing theory and development, from prehumans caring for their young, through Florence Nightingale's military traditionalism, to the humanist views of Dorthea Orem and Martha Rogers, to the professional socialization theory of Ada Jacox. Norman, Elizabeth M. Dempsey. Nurses in War: A Study of Female Military Nurses Who Served in Vietnam During the War Years, 1965– 1973. Ph.D. diss., New York University 1985. This retrospective study of female military nurses explored the war experiences of 50 women who served in Vietnam in the Army, Navy, and Air Force Nurse Corps. Through face-to-face interviews, the women were interviewed about their war experiences and the effects of these experiences on their lives. Rogge, Mary Madeline. Development of a Taxonomy of Nursing Interventions: An Analysis of Nursing Care in the American Civil War (Practice). Ph.D. diss., The University of Texas at Austin 1985. By utilizing the phenomenological approach to concept synthesis, a taxonomy of nursing interventions was developed from the analysis of a single case study to facilitate classifying the activities nurses perform in providing nursing care to patients. To strengthen the generalizability of the taxonomy, a historical investigation was conducted to provide additional data about how nurses implement their care of patients

OCR for page 69
Military Nursing Research: Bibliographies Ross, Kristie R. Women Are Needed Here: Northern Protestant Women as Nurses During the Civil War, 1861–1865. Ph.D. diss., Columbia University 1993. This dissertation is a study of the organization and experience of a select group of middle- and upper-class women as hospital nurses during the Civil War. Sarnecky, Mary T. Weber. A Woman for All Seasons: A Biography of Julia Catherine Stimson (1881 –1948). D.N.Sc. diss., University of San Diego 1990. The purpose of this investigation was to examine the life and character of Miss Stimson and to identify the many diverse contributions that she made to the profession of nursing and to humanity. Scannell-Desch, Elizabeth Ann. The Lived Experience of Women Military Nurses in Vietnam During the Vietnam War (Women Nurses). Ph.D. diss., Georgia State University 1992. The purpose of the study was to explore common components of nurses lived experiences in Vietnam and common elements of their lives after returning from Vietnam.

OCR for page 69
Military Nursing Research: Bibliographies This page in the original is blank.