Table 3.2 Paper Generated by U.S. Navy Ships with No On-board Incinerator

CLASS

POUNDS /HOUR

PAPER GENERATED (POUNDS /MISSION )

CUBIC FEET /MISSION UNPROCESSED

CUBIC FEET /MISSION COMPACTED

Cruiser (CGN 26)

28

20,000

3,400

1,000

Cruiser (CG 47)

19

14,000

2,300

700

Destroyer

14 to 18

10,000 to 13,000

1,600 to 2,200

500 to 700

Frigate

10

7,300

1,200

400

Mine ships

3 to 4

830

140

42

Source: U.S. Navy (1993).

Applicability of Incineration to Navy Vessels

In the foregoing section, one sees that a significant number of larger Navy vessels are equipped with incinerators and that the capacity available is more than equal to burning all paper and plastic wastes generated on these ships. These installed units have manual feed, do not have provision for auxiliary fuel use, and do not have the controls that reflect current best incineration practice. The existence of installed ducting needed for discharge of the products of combustion may reduce the amount of redesign and cost of retrofit with state-of-the-art units or modernization of existing incinerators.

Table 3.3 presents information on selected commercial incinerators. Price comparisons are difficult, and the numbers given are intended only to indicate the range available. All of the units are furnished with automatic feed and ash-handling equipment. All four units offer shock cooling for dioxin control. Automatic operation was discussed in Materials for Construction of Shipboard Waste Incinerators (NRC, 1977).

Table 3.3 Commercial Incinerator Equipment

VENDOR

CAPACITY (LB/H )

FOOTPRINT (FT 2)

AUXILIARY OIL BURNER

PARTICULATES

PRICE ($)

AUTO FEED /ASH

Ventomatic

500 1

75 2

Optional

Cyclone

150,000

Yes

Brule

500 1

80 2

Optional

Cyclone

250,000

Yes

Norsk Hydro

1,000 3

300 2

Burner On

3-Chamber

350,000

Yes

Techno-Products (Deerberg)

1,000 3

200 2

Burner-On

3-Chamber

450,000

Yes

Golar

330 3

110

Burner On

2-Chamber

Yes

1   From Navy specifications.

2   From vendor's drawings.

3   Calculated, approximately, from vendor-supplied kW figures assuming trash fuel only at 8,000 BTU/lb.

Because of the similarity of waste streams on board Navy, cruise line, and other vessels, vendors of commercial incineration equipment may be able to adapt their technologies to Navy ships. Some factors that need to be considered in adapting these technologies to Navy use are discussed in the following section. It is important to establish a program to train an engineering technical rating, i.e., a specific crew assignment, in the proper operation and maintenance of the incinerators in use. The issues



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