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APPENDIX F 336 original typesetting files. Page breaks are true to the original; line lengths, word breaks, heading styles, and other typesetting-specific formatting, however, cannot be About this PDF file: This new digital representation of the original work has been recomposed from XML files created from the original paper book, not from the retained, and some typographic errors may have been accidentally inserted. Please use the print version of this publication as the authoritative version for attribution. APPENDIX F DOT Scales for the 1970 Census Classification PATRICIA A.ROOS and DONALD J.TREIMAN To be able to relate the characteristics of occupations, as available in the DOT, to the characteristics of individuals in those occupations, as available in U.S. Census and survey data, would provide a tool for substantially increasing understanding of the operation of the U.S. economy. The need for this capability has been noted by a number of researchers, as documented in chapter 4, and was one underlying purpose of the development of the Standard Occupational Classification. At present, the only available source of data on occupations is the aggregation of characteristics of occupational incumbents published every 10 years by the Census Bureau (e.g., U.S. Bureau of the Census, 1973). The occupational characteristics in the DOT constitute an additional rich source of data, particularly valuable because they measure aspects of job content rather than the characteristics of workers. To be most useful, however, the DOT occupational characteristics, which exist as scores for each of 12,099 occupations, must be mapped into whatever classification is used to code the occupations of individuals. To illustrate the possibility of such a capability, we have estimated summary scores of selected DOT characteristics for the 591 occupational 1These variables are discussed in greater detail in footnote a of Table F-1.

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APPENDIX F 337 original typesetting files. Page breaks are true to the original; line lengths, word breaks, heading styles, and other typesetting-specific formatting, however, cannot be About this PDF file: This new digital representation of the original work has been recomposed from XML files created from the original paper book, not from the retained, and some typographic errors may have been accidentally inserted. Please use the print version of this publication as the authoritative version for attribution. categories in the 1970 Census. Table F-1 (at the end of this appendix) presents these scores for each of eight occupational characteristics in the fourth edition DOT: DATA, PEOPLE, THINGS, GED, SVP, STRENGTH, PHYSDEM (physical demands), and ENVIRON (environmental conditions).1 Table F-2 (at the end of this appendix) provides scores for each of four factor-based scales derived from the DOT worker trait and worker function variables: substantive complexity, motor skills, physical demands, and undesirable working conditions.2 CENSUS SCORES FOR EIGHT DOT VARIABLES To derive these scores, we took advantage of a source of data that includes both the 1970 U.S. Census occupation codes and the fourth edition DOT codes as well as enough cases to produce reliable estimates for detailed occupational categories. The April 1971 Current Population Survey (CPS), containing information for 60,441 workers, had been coded routinely with 1970 Census occupation codes. The occupational descriptions from this CPS had also been coded with third edition DOT codes by the staff of the occupational analysis field centers of the U.S. Employment Service. A map relating third to fourth edition DOT codes (created by the Division of Occupational Analysis) was used to add the fourth edition DOT occupational characteristics.3 Fourth edition codes were not available for 6,984 cases. To create scores for the census occupations, we averaged the DOT scores for all individuals in each census category. We did this by computing an average of the scores for all DOT occupations in each census occupation, with weights proportional to the number of individuals holding each DOT occupation. Computing unweighted averages would in effect assume that each DOT title within a given census occupation occurs with equal frequency in the 2A computer tape containing scores for the full set of fourth edition DOT occupational characteristics plus the four factor-based scales for the 1970 Census categories has been deposited with the National Technical Information Service and the Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research, University of Michigan. Thanks are due to Professor Jonathan Kelley for his advice on the construction of the factor-based scales. 3Lloyd Temme, then at the U.S. Bureau of the Census, made available to us the Current Population Survey containing codes for the fourth edition DOT. Earlier, Temme (1975) had performed a similar aggregation of third edition DOT codes into 1960 and 1970 Census occupational categories, using two Current Population Surveys (October 1966 and April 1971). Estimates for all third edition DOT characteristics for 595 1970 Census categories are available to interested users and may be obtained from Kenneth Spenner, Career Development, Boys Town Center for the Study of Youth Development, Boys Town, Nebraska 68010.

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APPENDIX F 338 original typesetting files. Page breaks are true to the original; line lengths, word breaks, heading styles, and other typesetting-specific formatting, however, cannot be About this PDF file: This new digital representation of the original work has been recomposed from XML files created from the original paper book, not from the retained, and some typographic errors may have been accidentally inserted. Please use the print version of this publication as the authoritative version for attribution. labor force. An illustation of the distortion that this would create can be found by considering the DOT occupations Bricklayer (861.381–018) and Stonemason (861.381–038), which combine (along with other DOT occupations) to form the census occupation Brickmasons and Stonemasons (410). It so happens that there are approximately 10 times as many bricklayers as stonemasons, as estimated by the representative sample of the Current Population Survey (bricklayers compose 70 percent of the category, and stonemasons compose 7 percent). With no weighting, both occupations would have equal weight in determining the occupational averages; weighting by the proportion of the sample in each of the two DOT titles means that the DOT occupation Bricklayer properly has the larger contribution to the average score for the census category. To create the occupational characteristic estimates provided in this appendix, we thus computed a weighted average of the scores for all the DOT occupations falling within any census category. The census classification used is not the standard three-digit code but the expanded version used in published reports (e.g., U.S. Bureau of the Census, 1973), which takes into account distinctions about industry and class of worker if such information is available.4 Even with the large sample used in the aggregation, however, not all of the census occupational categories were represented in the CPS data. Thus the CPS data could not be used to provide estimates for 18 census occupations plus an unknown number of industrial distinctions within those occupational categories in which such distinctions are made. It was possible to assign scores to 17 of the census categories by borrowing scores from similar occupations or sets of occupations. Decision rules for these assignments are given in Table F-3 (at the end of this appendix). CENSUS SCORES FOR FOUR FACTOR-BASED SCALES Because, as we have seen in chapter 7, the DOT worker function and worker trait variables are highly redundant, with many items highly intercorrelated, it seemed desirable to develop multiple-item scales of the major underlying dimensions so as to improve reliability (Nunnally, 1967:191–198). To do this, we factor analyzed the 46 worker traits and worker functions by using as data the aggregated DOT scores for the 574 census occupational categories (categories for which scores had to be estimated were excluded from the analysis). This factor analysis is analogous but not identical to that reported in chapter 7, which is based on 4The expanded version of the 1970 U.S. Census occupational classification is described in greater detail in footnote b of Table F-1.

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APPENDIX F 339 original typesetting files. Page breaks are true to the original; line lengths, word breaks, heading styles, and other typesetting-specific formatting, however, cannot be About this PDF file: This new digital representation of the original work has been recomposed from XML files created from the original paper book, not from the retained, and some typographic errors may have been accidentally inserted. Please use the print version of this publication as the authoritative version for attribution. a 10-percent sample of the 12,099 DOT occupations. The two samples differ mainly in that the DOT sample includes proportionately more occupations in the production sector than does the census, as documented in chapter 7. The variables also differ slightly. For example, the working condition variables are coded as dichotomies in the DOT sample but as proportions in the census sample (the proportion of constituent DOT occupations having the condition). Nonetheless, the two samples are conceptually similar. It is therefore reassuring that the factor analysis results obtained in this exercise5 are not too dissimilar from those reported in chapter 7. Four interpretable factors emerged: substantive complexity, motor skills, physical demands, and undesirable working conditions. These correspond to factors 1, 2, 3, and 6 reported in chapter 7. The next step was to choose for each factor that set of items that loaded strongly on the factor and only weakly or not at all on the other factors. The general rule of thumb used was that items should load at least .5 on the primary factor and less than .3 on the remaining factors. Items chosen in this way were then standardized and summed to form each scale, and, for convenience, each scale was converted to a 0–10 range (the lowest-scoring occupation is scored zero and the highest-scoring occupation is scored 10). This procedure gives all included items equal weight. The items included in each scale are shown below; the factor loadings from a reduced factor analysis including only the items appearing in one of the four scales are shown in Table F-4 (at the end of this appendix); and the scale scores for each census occupation are shown in Table F-2. (See Table 7-8 for a more complete description of these variables.) The four factor scales and items included in them are as follows: (1) substantive complexity, including DATA (worker function), GED (training time), SVP (training time), INTELL (aptitude), VERBAL (aptitude), NUMER (aptitude), ABSTRACT (interest), and REPCON (temperament for repetitive or continuous process); (2) motor skills, including THINGS (worker function), MOTOR (aptitude), FINGDEX (aptitude), MANDEX (aptitude), COLORDIS (aptitude), and SEE (physical demand), and (3) physical demands, including EYEHAND (aptitude), CLIMB (physical demand), STOOP (physical demand), LOCATION (working condition), and HAZARDS (working condition), and (4) undesirable working conditions, including COLD (working condition), HEAT (working condition), and WET (working condition). 5The factor analysis was carried out using the SPSS computer program: the procedures used were principal components with iterations, varimax rotation, and default options.

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About this PDF file: This new digital representation of the original work has been recomposed from XML files created from the original paper book, not from the original typesetting files. Page breaks are true to the original; line lengths, word breaks, heading styles, and other typesetting-specific formatting, however, cannot be retained, and some typographic errors may have been accidentally inserted. Please use the print version of this publication as the authoritative version for attribution. TABLE F-1 Worker Function and Selected Worker Trait Scores for 1970 U.S. Census Occupational Categoriesa DATA PEOPLE THINGS GED SVP STRENGTH PHYSDEM ENVIRON Occupational Codeb Occupational Title 0010000 Accountants 1.4 6.2 5.7 4.8 7.3 1.0 0.4 0.0 0020000 Architects 0.3 6.0 1.3 5.8 7.9 1.9 1.9 0.1 APPENDIX F 0030000 Computer programmers 1.2 6.0 3.9 5.1 7.1 1.1 1.1 0.0 0040000 Computer systems analysts 1.0 6.0 6.3 5.3 7.0 1.0 1.0 0.0 0050000 Computer specialists, n.e.c. 0.8 3.7 7.0 5.2 7.2 1.3 1.0 0.0 0060000 Aeronautical and astronautical engineers 0.5 5.8 1.8 5.4 7.8 1.7 1.8 0.3 0100000 Chemical engineers 0.6 6.0 1.7 5.7 7.8 2.0 1.8 0.2 0110000 Civil engineers 0.2 6.0 1.3 4.9 7.9 2.0 2.0 0.1 0120000 Electrical and electronic engineers 0.4 6.0 2.0 5.1 7.9 1.9 1.9 0.1 0130000 Industrial engineers 0.9 5.8 6.0 5.2 7.3 1.4 1.1 0.1 0140000 Mechanical engineers 0.3 5.9 1.4 5.0 7.8 1.9 2.0 0.2 0150000 Metallurgical and materials engineers 0.2 6.0 2.3 5.2 7.7 1.9 1.8 0.0 0200000 Mining engineers 0.0 6.0 1.0 5.3 8.0 2.0 2.7 2.0 0210000 Petroleum engineers 0.1 6.0 1.7 5.4 7.9 1.8 1.4 0.0 0220000 Sales engineers 1.5 5.3 4.6 4.7 7.1 1.8 0.9 0.0 0230000 Engineers, n.e.c. 0.5 6.0 2.4 5.2 7.7 1.6 1.6 0.1 0240000 Farm management advisors 1.0 2.6 5.2 4.9 6.9 2.1 0.7 0.0 0250000 Foresters and conservationists 2.3 6.4 4.3 3.9 5.7 3.0 2.5 1.0 0260000 Home management advisors 1.4 2.0 4.6 5.2 7.4 2.0 0.8 0.0 0300000 Judges 1.0 0.0 7.0 6.0 9.0 1.0 0.0 0.0 0310000 Lawyers 1.1 0.4 7.0 5.9 7.9 1.0 0.0 0.0 0320000 Librarians 1.5 4.2 7.0 4.5 6.4 2.2 1.2 0.1 0330000 Archivists and curators 1.5 5.3 5.5 4.7 7.0 2.0 1.3 0.5 0340000 Actuaries 1.1 6.0 7.0 5.0 7.9 1.0 0.7 0.0 0350000 Mathematicians 0.3 6.0 7.0 5.8 7.8 1.0 1.5 0.0 0360000 Statisticians 0.9 6.1 6.6 5.0 6.9 1.1 1.0 0.0 0420000 Agricultural scientists 1.6 5.2 3.4 5.0 6.8 2.4 2.3 0.3 340

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About this PDF file: This new digital representation of the original work has been recomposed from XML files created from the original paper book, not from the original typesetting files. Page breaks are true to the original; line lengths, word breaks, heading styles, and other typesetting-specific formatting, however, cannot be retained, and some typographic errors may have been accidentally inserted. Please use the print version of this publication as the authoritative version for attribution. 0430000 Atmospheric and space scientists 0.6 6.0 3.6 4.7 6.7 1.3 1.0 0.0 0440000 Biological scientists 0.4 6.1 1.3 5.8 7.7 1.8 2.0 0.2 0450000 Chemists 0.2 6.0 1.1 5.8 7.8 2.0 1.9 0.1 0510000 Geologists 0.0 6.0 1.0 6.0 8.0 2.0 3.9 0.9 APPENDIX F 0520000 Marine scientists 0.0 6.0 1.0 6.0 8.0 2.0 2.0 0.0 0530000 Physicists and astronomers 0.1 5.6 2.1 5.9 8.0 1.8 1.8 0.1 0540000 Life and physical scientists, n.e.c. 0.0 6.0 7.0 5.0 7.0 1.0 1.0 0.0 0550000 Operations and systems researchers and analysts 1.3 6.0 6.3 4.9 6.8 1.1 1.0 0.0 0560000 Personnel and labor relations workers 1.5 3.9 6.7 4.8 6.5 1.2 0.4 0.0 0610000 Chiropractors 1.0 0.0 .0 5.0 7.0 3.0 2.0 0.0 0620000 Dentists 1.0 0.3 .0 5.9 7.9 1.1 2.0 0.0 0630000 Optometrists 1.0 0.0 .0 5.0 7.0 1.0 2.0 0.0 0640000 Pharmacists 1.0 6.0 .6 4.9 7.0 1.9 1.8 0.0 0650000 Physicians, medical and osteopathic 1.0 0.5 .4 5.9 7.9 2.0 1.9 0.1 0710000 Podiatrists 1.0 0.2 .7 5.0 7.0 2.1 1.9 0.0 0720000 Veterinarians 1.1 2.2 .4 4.8 7.7 2.7 2.0 1.0 0730000 Health practitioners, n.e.c. 1.0 0.0 1.0 5.0 7.0 3.0 2.0 0.0 0740000 Dietitians 1.0 2.9 6.8 5.0 6.8 2.0 1.0 0.0 0750000 Registered nurses 2.8 6.5 4.1 4.9 6.9 2.9 2.0 0.0 0760000 Therapists 1.7 2.9 3.0 4.7 6.6 2.0 2.0 0.3 0800000 Clinical laboratory technologists and technicians 3.0 6.8 1.2 4.8 6.0 2.1 2.0 0.1 0810000 Dental hygienists 3.0 6.3 1.0 4.0 6.2 2.0 1.9 0.0 0820000 Health record technologists and technicians 2.4 6.0 7.0 4.9 6.3 2.2 1.1 0.1 0830000 Radiologic technologists and technicians 2.9 5.8 1.8 4.8 5.8 2.7 2.0 1.0 0840000 Therapy assistants 2.9 6.3 2.2 4.6 6.0 2.2 1.9 0.3 0850000 Health technologists and technicians, n.e.c. 2.7 6.0 3.8 4.2 6.0 2.1 1.7 0.4 0860000 Clergymen 0.0 0.0 7.0 6.0 8.0 2.0 0.0 0.0 Religious workers, n.e.c. 1.1 1.5 6.6 5.3 7.4 1.7 0.4 0.0 0900000 341

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About this PDF file: This new digital representation of the original work has been recomposed from XML files created from the original paper book, not from the original typesetting files. Page breaks are true to the original; line lengths, word breaks, heading styles, and other typesetting-specific formatting, however, cannot be retained, and some typographic errors may have been accidentally inserted. Please use the print version of this publication as the authoritative version for attribution. DATA PEOPLE THINGS GED SVP STRENGTH PHYSDEM ENVIRON Occupational Codeb Occupational Title 0910000 Economists 1.0 5.5 6.7 4.9 6.9 1.3 1.0 0.0 0920000 Political scientists 1.3 3.8 7.0 4.7 6.4 1.3 0.9 0.0 0930000 Psychologists 1.0 1.5 6.6 5.9 7.9 1.4 0.8 0.0 APPENDIX F 0940000 Sociologists 2.0 2.0 7.0 6.0 8.0 2.0 0.0 0.0 0950000 Urban and regional planners 1.0 6.0 5.9 5.2 7.8 1.4 0.8 0.2 0960000 Social scientists, n.e.c. 0.4 5.4 7.0 5.6 7.1 1.6 1.3 0.0 1000000 Social workers 1.1 1.4 6.9 4.9 6.9 1.2 0.2 0.0 1010000 Recreation workers 1.3 2.9 6.8 4.8 7.0 1.8 0.8 0.0 1020000 Agriculture teachers 2.0 2.0 7.0 6.0 8.0 2.0 0.0 0.0 1030000 Atmospheric, earth, marine, and space teachers 1.3 3.3 5.0 6.0 8.0 2.0 1.3 0.0 1040000 Biology teachers 2.0 2.0 7.0 6.0 8.0 2.0 0.2 0.0 1050000 Chemistry teachers 1.9 2.3 6.6 6.0 8.0 2.0 0.3 0.0 1100000 Physics teachers 2.0 2.0 7.0 6.0 8.0 2.0 0.4 0.0 1110000 Engineering teachers 1.9 2.4 6.7 6.0 8.0 2.0 0.3 0.0 1120000 Mathematics teachers 2.0 2.0 7.0 5.9 7.9 2.0 0.0 0.0 1130000 Health specialties teachers 1.9 2.5 6.3 5.6 7.6 1.8 0.2 0.0 1140000 Psychology teachers 2.0 2.0 7.0 6.0 8.0 2.0 0.0 0.0 1150000 Business and commerce teachers 2.0 2.0 7.0 6.0 8.0 2.0 0.0 0.0 1160000 Economics teachers 2.0 2.0 7.0 6.0 8.0 2.0 0.2 0.0 1200000 History teachers 1.9 2.2 7.0 5.8 7.8 1.9 0.0 0.0 1210000 Sociology teachers 2.0 2.0 7.0 6.0 8.0 2.0 0.0 0.0 1220000 Social science teachers, n.e.c. 1.9 2.3 7.0 6.0 8.0 1.9 0.0 0.0 1230000 Art, drama, and music teachers 1.2 2.2 5.0 5.5 7.9 2.0 0.8 0.0 1240000 Coaches and physical education teachers 2.0 2.0 6.6 5.3 7.9 2.4 1.6 0.0 1250000 Education teachers 2.0 2.0 7.0 5.9 7.9 2.0 0.0 0.0 English teachers 2.0 2.2 6.8 5.7 7.7 2.0 0.2 0.0 1260000 342

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About this PDF file: This new digital representation of the original work has been recomposed from XML files created from the original paper book, not from the original typesetting files. Page breaks are true to the original; line lengths, word breaks, heading styles, and other typesetting-specific formatting, however, cannot be retained, and some typographic errors may have been accidentally inserted. Please use the print version of this publication as the authoritative version for attribution. 1300000 Foreign language teachers 2.0 2.0 7.0 5.6 7.6 2.0 0.0 0.0 1310000 Home economics teachers 1.6 2.0 4.9 5.6 7.6 2.0 0.7 0.0 1320000 Law teachers 2.0 2.0 7.0 6.0 8.0 2.0 0.0 0.0 1330000 Theology teachers 2.0 2.0 7.0 6.0 8.0 2.0 0.0 0.0 APPENDIX F 1340000 Trade, industrial, and technical teachers 2.0 2.0 7.0 4.4 7.2 2.0 0.8 0.0 1350000 Miscellaneous teachers, college and university 2.0 2.0 7.0 6.0 8.0 2.0 0.1 0.0 1400000 Teachers, college and university, subject not specified 2.0 2.3 6.7 5.7 7.7 2.0 0.5 0.0 1410000 Adult education teachers 2.0 2.1 6.6 4.8 6.9 2.0 0.4 0.0 1420000 Elementary school teachers 2.0 2.0 6.9 5.0 6.1 2.0 0.1 0.0 1430000 Prekindergarten and kindergarten teachers 3.1 3.5 6.8 4.4 5.9 2.2 0.6 0.3 1440000 Secondary school teachers 1.9 2.0 6.5 5.0 7.0 2.0 0.3 0.0 1450000 Teachers, except college and university, n.e.c. 0.9 2.2 3.8 4.9 7.3 1.9 1.6 0.1 1500000 Agriculture and biological technicians 2.4 6.4 2.3 4.1 5.4 2.3 1.8 0.7 1510000 Chemical technicians 2.3 6.5 1.8 4.3 5.9 2.0 2.0 0.7 1520000 Draftsmen 1.8 7.2 1.1 4.8 6.9 1.2 2.0 0.0 1530000 Electrical and electronic engineering technicians 1.5 6.3 1.5 4.4 6.8 2.0 2.0 0.1 1540000 Industrial engineering technicians 3.0 7.0 5.1 4.1 5.6 1.7 1.7 0.0 1550000 Mechanical engineering technicians 2.0 6.8 0.8 4.6 6.2 2.2 2.0 0.0 1560000 Mathematical technicians 1.0 6.0 2.0 5.0 7.0 1.0 1.0 0.0 1610000 Surveyors 1.2 6.1 6.7 4.8 6.8 2.0 2.8 0.0 1620000 Engineering and science technicians, n.e.c. 2.1 6.1 2.4 4.4 6.1 1.9 1.9 0.3 1630000 Airplane pilots 2.1 5.9 3.2 4.9 6.8 2.0 2.0 2.1 1640000 Air traffic controllers 1.1 6.1 2.4 4.0 7.6 1.7 1.7 0.0 1650000 Embalmers 1.6 6.3 5.1 4.0 7.0 2.6 2.3 0.6 1700000 Flight engineers 2.0 6.0 1.0 4.0 7.0 2.0 3.0 1.0 Radio operators 2.4 6.0 2.7 3.5 5.0 1.2 1.3 0.1 1710000 343

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About this PDF file: This new digital representation of the original work has been recomposed from XML files created from the original paper book, not from the original typesetting files. Page breaks are true to the original; line lengths, word breaks, heading styles, and other typesetting-specific formatting, however, cannot be retained, and some typographic errors may have been accidentally inserted. Please use the print version of this publication as the authoritative version for attribution. DATA PEOPLE THINGS GED SVP STRENGTH PHYSDEM ENVIRON Occupational Codeb Occupational Title 1720000 Tool programers, numerical control 1.9 6.0 6.1 4.6 7.3 1.4 1.2 0.2 1730000 Technicians, n.e.c. 2.2 6.1 2.8 4.3 5.4 2.0 1.7 0.0 1740000 Vocational and educational counselors 1.2 1.0 7.0 5.1 7.0 1.8 1.3 0.0 APPENDIX F 1750000 Actors 1.1 4.1 6.0 4.5 6.6 2.0 0.7 0.2 1800000 Athletes and kindred workers 2.3 2.9 5.5 4.0 7.3 3.1 3.2 0.3 1810000 Authors 0.6 6.2 7.0 5.7 7.6 1.0 0.6 0.0 1820000 Dancers 0.0 4.0 7.0 4.0 7.0 2.0 3.0 0.0 1830000 Designers 0.8 6.2 1.8 4.8 7.1 1.6 1.8 0.1 1840000 Editors and reporters 0.5 4.5 6.8 5.4 7.6 1.0 1.2 0.0 1850000 Musicians and composers 0.0 4.0 2.6 4.9 8.0 2.0 1.7 0.7 1900000 Painters and sculptors 0.6 6.0 1.2 4.8 7.1 1.3 1.9 0.0 1910000 Photographers 0.5 6.1 2.2 4.0 6.8 2.0 2.0 0.1 1920000 Public relations men and publicity writers 0.3 6.0 6.7 5.0 7.1 1.0 0.8 0.0 1930000 Radio and television announcers 1.2 4.3 7.0 5.0 6.1 1.0 0.2 0.0 1940000 Writers, artists, and entertainers, n.e.c. 1.7 4.5 5.5 4.8 6.9 1.5 1.5 0.2 1950000 Research workers, not specified 1.8 4.1 5.3 5.2 7.2 1.9 1.2 0.1 2010000 Assessors, controllers, and treasurers; local public 1.1 4.7 6.8 4.9 7.1 1.7 1.3 0.0 administration 2020000 Bank officers and financial managers 1.3 2.6 6.7 4.9 7.7 1.1 0.4 0.0 2030000 Buyers and shippers, farm products 1.3 4.4 7.0 4.5 6.7 2.0 0.6 0.3 2050000 Buyers, wholesale and retail trade 1.2 5.1 6.9 4.0 6.2 1.7 1.2 0.0 2100000 Credit men 1.2 5.8 6.9 4.9 7.6 1.0 0.0 0.0 2110000 Funeral directors 1.2 6.0 7.0 3.9 6.8 2.1 2.0 0.0 2120000 Health administrators 1.1 2.5 6.3 4.9 7.5 1.8 0.6 0.1 Construction inspectors, public administration 1.2 6.0 6.6 4.8 6.8 2.0 2.9 0.2 2130000 344

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About this PDF file: This new digital representation of the original work has been recomposed from XML files created from the original paper book, not from the original typesetting files. Page breaks are true to the original; line lengths, word breaks, heading styles, and other typesetting-specific formatting, however, cannot be retained, and some typographic errors may have been accidentally inserted. Please use the print version of this publication as the authoritative version for attribution. Inspectors, except construction, public administration 2159170 Federal administration and postal service 2.5 6.5 5.7 4.1 5.9 2.2 2.0 0.6 2159270 State public administration 2.2 6.3 6.3 3.9 5.2 2.0 1.8 0.4 2159370 Local public administration 2.2 6.0 5.5 4.0 5.3 2.5 2.5 0.5 APPENDIX F 2160000 Managers and superintendents, building 1.4 5.3 6.7 3.7 6.4 2.1 0.9 0.1 2200000 Office managers, n.e.c. 1.1 5.8 6.9 4.1 7.0 1.1 0.1 0.0 2210000 Officers, pilots, and pursers; ship 1.5 3.9 3.6 4.0 7.1 2.4 2.7 1.0 Officials and administrators, public administration, n.e.c. 2229170 Federal administration and postal service 1.3 4.1 6.6 4.8 7.2 1.3 0.4 0.0 2229270 State public administration 1.5 4.9 6.8 4.5 6.4 1.9 1.3 0.4 2229370 Local public administration 1.7 4.9 6.2 4.5 6.5 1.4 0.9 0.2 2230000 Officials of lodges, societies, and unions 1.1 4.4 6.7 4.9 7.7 1.1 0.2 0.0 2240000 Postmasters and mail superintendents 1.0 5.5 7.0 4.0 6.8 1.2 0.0 0.0 2250000 Purchasing agents and buyers, n.e.c. 1.1 4.7 7.0 4.1 6.7 1.2 0.3 0.0 2260000 Railroad conductors 1.8 5.9 6.9 3.8 7.2 2.2 2.6 1.0 2300000 Restaurant, cafeteria, and bar managers 1.3 5.9 6.6 3.9 6.6 1.9 1.5 0.0 2310000 Sales managers and department heads, retail trade 1.1 4.6 6.9 4.2 6.6 1.6 0.2 0.0 2330000 Sales managers, except retail trade 1.1 5.3 6.9 4.9 7.7 1.1 0.1 0.0 2350000 School administrators, college 1.4 3.2 6.7 5.0 7.6 1.3 0.2 0.0 2400000 School administrators, elementary and secondary 1.2 1.4 6.8 5.0 7.9 1.2 0.2 0.0 Managers and administrators, n.e.c. 2450990 Construction, salaried 1.1 4.9 6.1 4.6 7.6 1.8 0.7 0.4 2450991 Construction, self-employed 1.7 6.2 5.4 3.9 6.9 2.3 1.6 1.0 2452990 Tobacco manufactures, salaried 1.1 3.0 6.2 4.9 7.7 1.5 0.4 0.1 Tobacco manufactures, self-employed 1.6 3.7 5.4 4.5 7.3 1.7 0.8 0.2 2452991 345

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About this PDF file: This new digital representation of the original work has been recomposed from XML files created from the original paper book, not from the original typesetting files. Page breaks are true to the original; line lengths, word breaks, heading styles, and other typesetting-specific formatting, however, cannot be retained, and some typographic errors may have been accidentally inserted. Please use the print version of this publication as the authoritative version for attribution. DATA PEOPLE THINGS GED SVP STRENGTH PHYSDEM ENVIRON Occupational Codeb Occupational Title 2453990 Manufacturing, nondurable goods, salaried 1.0 2.7 6.5 5.0 7.8 1.5 0.3 0.0 2453991 Manufacturing, nondurable goods, self-employed 1.9 4.7 5.1 4.4 6.7 1.8 0.8 0.4 2454390 Transportation, salaried 1.3 4.6 6.6 4.5 7.3 1.3 0.3 0.1 APPENDIX F 2454391 Transportation, self-employed 2.7 5.3 5.5 3.9 6.0 2.0 1.2 0.4 2454990 Communications, and utilities and sanitary 1.0 4.9 6.2 4.8 7.5 1.4 0.5 0.1 services, salaried 2454991 Communications, and utilities and sanitary 3.7 6.0 4.9 3.5 4.6 2.3 1.3 0.5 services, self-employed 2455990 Wholesale trade, salaried 1.1 4.2 6.8 4.7 7.4 1.3 0.4 0.0 2455991 Wholesale trade, self-employed 1.3 5.4 6.7 4.3 6.8 1.4 0.9 0.0 Retail trade 2456070 Lumber and building material, salaried 1.2 5.2 6.9 4.2 6.9 1.3 0.2 0.0 2456071 Lumber and building material, self-employed 1.2 6.0 6.8 4.0 6.9 1.2 0.2 0.0 2456090 Department and mail order establishments, salaried 1.2 5.3 6.9 4.2 6.7 1.3 0.2 0.0 2456091 Department and mail order establishments, self- 1.1 5.7 6.9 4.1 7.0 1.1 0.0 0.0 employed 2456280 Grocery stores, salaried 1.1 5.8 6.9 4.0 6.9 1.1 0.1 0.0 2456281 Grocery stores, self-employed 1.4 6.1 6.8 3.9 6.6 1.3 0.3 0.0 2456390 Motor vehicle dealers, salaried 1.4 5.4 6.3 4.2 6.8 1.5 0.7 0.0 2456391 Motor vehicle dealers, self-employed 1.4 5.6 6.2 4.1 6.7 1.3 0.3 0.1 Gasoline service stations, salaried 2.0 5.9 6.5 3.7 5.8 1.8 0.9 0.2 2456480 346

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About this PDF file: This new digital representation of the original work has been recomposed from XML files created from the original paper book, not from the original typesetting files. Page breaks are true to the original; line lengths, word breaks, heading styles, and other typesetting-specific formatting, however, cannot be retained, and some typographic errors may have been accidentally inserted. Please use the print version of this publication as the authoritative version for attribution.APPENDIX F 379

OCR for page 336
About this PDF file: This new digital representation of the original work has been recomposed from XML files created from the original paper book, not from the original typesetting files. Page breaks are true to the original; line lengths, word breaks, heading styles, and other typesetting-specific formatting, however, cannot be retained, and some typographic errors may have been accidentally inserted. Please use the print version of this publication as the authoritative version for attribution.APPENDIX F 380

OCR for page 336
About this PDF file: This new digital representation of the original work has been recomposed from XML files created from the original paper book, not from the original typesetting files. Page breaks are true to the original; line lengths, word breaks, heading styles, and other typesetting-specific formatting, however, cannot be retained, and some typographic errors may have been accidentally inserted. Please use the print version of this publication as the authoritative version for attribution.APPENDIX F 381

OCR for page 336
About this PDF file: This new digital representation of the original work has been recomposed from XML files created from the original paper book, not from the original typesetting files. Page breaks are true to the original; line lengths, word breaks, heading styles, and other typesetting-specific formatting, however, cannot be retained, and some typographic errors may have been accidentally inserted. Please use the print version of this publication as the authoritative version for attribution.APPENDIX F 382

OCR for page 336
About this PDF file: This new digital representation of the original work has been recomposed from XML files created from the original paper book, not from the original typesetting files. Page breaks are true to the original; line lengths, word breaks, heading styles, and other typesetting-specific formatting, however, cannot be retained, and some typographic errors may have been accidentally inserted. Please use the print version of this publication as the authoritative version for attribution.APPENDIX F 383

OCR for page 336
About this PDF file: This new digital representation of the original work has been recomposed from XML files created from the original paper book, not from the original typesetting files. Page breaks are true to the original; line lengths, word breaks, heading styles, and other typesetting-specific formatting, however, cannot be retained, and some typographic errors may have been accidentally inserted. Please use the print version of this publication as the authoritative version for attribution.APPENDIX F 384

OCR for page 336
About this PDF file: This new digital representation of the original work has been recomposed from XML files created from the original paper book, not from the original typesetting files. Page breaks are true to the original; line lengths, word breaks, heading styles, and other typesetting-specific formatting, however, cannot be retained, and some typographic errors may have been accidentally inserted. Please use the print version of this publication as the authoritative version for attribution.APPENDIX F 385

OCR for page 336
About this PDF file: This new digital representation of the original work has been recomposed from XML files created from the original paper book, not from the original typesetting files. Page breaks are true to the original; line lengths, word breaks, heading styles, and other typesetting-specific formatting, however, cannot be retained, and some typographic errors may have been accidentally inserted. Please use the print version of this publication as the authoritative version for attribution.APPENDIX F 386

OCR for page 336
About this PDF file: This new digital representation of the original work has been recomposed from XML files created from the original paper book, not from the original typesetting files. Page breaks are true to the original; line lengths, word breaks, heading styles, and other typesetting-specific formatting, however, cannot be retained, and some typographic errors may have been accidentally inserted. Please use the print version of this publication as the authoritative version for attribution. TABLE F-3 Decision Rules for Assigning DOT Scores to Missing Occupational Categories Occupation Code Census Occupational Title Decision Rule 073 Health practitioners, n.e.c. Same as Chiropractors 084 Therapy assistants Weighted average of Clinical laboratory technologists and technicians; Dental hygienists; APPENDIX F Health record technologists and technicians; Radiologic technologists and technicians; and Health technologists and technicians, n.e.c. 280 Salesmen and sales clerks, n.e.c. Weighted average of Sales representatives, manufacturing industries; Sales representatives, wholesale trade; Sales clerks, retail trade; Salesmen, retail trade; Salesmen of services and construction 311 Clerical assistance, social welfare Same as Miscellaneous clerical workers, Professional and related services 383 Telegraph messengers Same as Messengers and office boys 395 Not specified clerical workers Weighted average of subcategories of Miscellaneous clerical workers (3943980–3949980) 504 Molder apprentices Same as Molders, metal 511 Painter apprentices Same as Painters, construction and maintenance 521 Plasterer apprentices Same as Plasterers 571 Specified craft apprentices, n.e.c. Same as Craftsmen and kindred workers, n.e.c. 572 Not specified apprentices Same as Craftsmen and kindred workers, n.e.c. 580 Former members of the Armed Forces No score assigned 636 Milliners Same as Dressmakers and seamstresses, except factory 692 Machine operatives, not specified Weighted average of subcategories of Machine operatives, miscellaneous specified (6900990–6909990) 694 Miscellaneous operatives Same as 692 Not specified operatives Same as 692 695 387

OCR for page 336
About this PDF file: This new digital representation of the original work has been recomposed from XML files created from the original paper book, not from the original typesetting files. Page breaks are true to the original; line lengths, word breaks, heading styles, and other typesetting-specific formatting, however, cannot be retained, and some typographic errors may have been accidentally inserted. Please use the print version of this publication as the authoritative version for attribution. Occupation Code Census Occupational Title Decision Rule 785 Not specified laborers Weighted average of subcategories of Miscellaneous laborers (7801070–7809990) 924 Lay midwives Weighted average of Dental assistants; Health aides, except nursing; Health trainees; Nursing aides, orderlies, and attendants; and Practical nurses APPENDIX F 388

OCR for page 336
APPENDIX F 389 original typesetting files. Page breaks are true to the original; line lengths, word breaks, heading styles, and other typesetting-specific formatting, however, cannot be About this PDF file: This new digital representation of the original work has been recomposed from XML files created from the original paper book, not from the retained, and some typographic errors may have been accidentally inserted. Please use the print version of this publication as the authoritative version for attribution. TABLE F-4 Factor Loadings: Varimax Rotated Factor Matrixa Factor Variable Substantive Motor Physical Undesirable Complexity Skills Demands Working Conditions −0.14 −0.17 0.92 0.01 DATA −0.06 0.05 0.89 0.12 THINGS −0.03 −0.17 −0.13 0.95 GED −0.02 −0.12 0.93 0.14 SVP −0.10 −0.18 −0.15 0.92 INTELL −0.18 −0.25 −0.14 0.90 VERBAL −0.01 −0.17 −0.12 0.84 NUMER −0.06 −0.09 0.82 0.08 MOTOR −0.08 −0.08 0.08 0.84 FINGDEX −0.31 −0.01 0.78 0.21 MANDEX −0.07 0.20 0.64 0.01 EYEHAND 0.15 0.52 0.00 0.17 COLORDIS −0.04 −0.10 0.83 0.13 ABSTRACT −0.81 −0.10 −0.01 0.24 REPCON −0.03 0.06 0.89 0.20 CLIMB −0.29 0.07 0.69 0.15 STOOP −0.09 0.04 0.71 0.13 SEE −0.11 −0.07 −0.02 0.73 LOCATION −0.16 −0.08 0.12 0.66 COLD −0.20 −0.01 0.11 0.71 HEAT −0.28 −0.05 0.14 0.66 WET −0.14 0.21 0.68 0.33 HAZARDS aSee text for description of variables. Scores on DATA, THINGS, INTELL, VERBAL, NUMER, MOTOR, FINGDEX, MANDEX, EYEHAND, and COLORDIS were reflected so that high scores represent high levels of the trait. Coefficients in boldface indicate that the item is included in the scale.