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Appendix G
Biographical Notes on Committee Members

SAMUEL L.KATZ is the Wilburt C.Davison Professor of Pediatrics and chairman of the Department of Pediatrics at Duke University, a position he has held since 1968. His research has focused on human virology, infectious diseases, and immunization. He has served on a variety of scientific advisory boards, committees and consultative groups, and editorial boards relating to problems in infectious diseases and immunization. He received his M.D. degree from Harvard University and his B.A. degree from Dartmouth College.


JOHN (A.J.) BEALE has been director of research for Wellcome Biotechnology Limited in the United Kingdom since the formation of that company in 1982. Before that he was director of biological products at The Wellcome Foundation Limited for 10 years. He studied medicine at Guy’s Hospital and specialized in infectious disease and microbiology. He spent two years in the mid-fifties as a research fellow in virology at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto.


MARSHALL H.BECKER is professor and chairman in the Department of Health Behavior and Health Education, School of Public Health, and professor in the Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. From 1974 to 1977 he was associate professor in the departments of Pediatrics, Behavioral Sciences, and Social Relations at Johns Hopkins University. He has published extensively on such topics as beliefs and attitudes as determinants of individuals’ health-related behaviors, patient compliance with prescribed regimens, diffusion of innovations among health professionals, drug-prescribing patterns, and different approaches to organizing the delivery of medical care. He is a medical sociologist and holds M.P.H. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Michigan.


JAMES CHIN is chief of the Infectious Disease Branch of the California Department of Health Services and clinical professor of epidemiology, University of California School of Public Health, Berkeley. His specialization in the epidemiology and control of infectious diseases began with the Hooper Foundation in San Francisco and with the Institute for Medical Research in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.



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New Vaccine Development: Establishing Priorities, Volume II, Diseases of Importance in Developing Countries Appendix G Biographical Notes on Committee Members SAMUEL L.KATZ is the Wilburt C.Davison Professor of Pediatrics and chairman of the Department of Pediatrics at Duke University, a position he has held since 1968. His research has focused on human virology, infectious diseases, and immunization. He has served on a variety of scientific advisory boards, committees and consultative groups, and editorial boards relating to problems in infectious diseases and immunization. He received his M.D. degree from Harvard University and his B.A. degree from Dartmouth College. JOHN (A.J.) BEALE has been director of research for Wellcome Biotechnology Limited in the United Kingdom since the formation of that company in 1982. Before that he was director of biological products at The Wellcome Foundation Limited for 10 years. He studied medicine at Guy’s Hospital and specialized in infectious disease and microbiology. He spent two years in the mid-fifties as a research fellow in virology at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto. MARSHALL H.BECKER is professor and chairman in the Department of Health Behavior and Health Education, School of Public Health, and professor in the Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. From 1974 to 1977 he was associate professor in the departments of Pediatrics, Behavioral Sciences, and Social Relations at Johns Hopkins University. He has published extensively on such topics as beliefs and attitudes as determinants of individuals’ health-related behaviors, patient compliance with prescribed regimens, diffusion of innovations among health professionals, drug-prescribing patterns, and different approaches to organizing the delivery of medical care. He is a medical sociologist and holds M.P.H. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Michigan. JAMES CHIN is chief of the Infectious Disease Branch of the California Department of Health Services and clinical professor of epidemiology, University of California School of Public Health, Berkeley. His specialization in the epidemiology and control of infectious diseases began with the Hooper Foundation in San Francisco and with the Institute for Medical Research in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

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New Vaccine Development: Establishing Priorities, Volume II, Diseases of Importance in Developing Countries Dr. Chin has served on many national committees related to infectious disease control, including the American Public Health Association Committee on Infectious Diseases, the National Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, and the Armed Forces Epidemiology Board. He received a B.S. from the University of Michigan, an M.D. from the State University of New York, Downstate, and an M.P.H. from the University of California, School of Public Health, Berkeley. PURNELL W.CHOPPIN recently became vice president and chief scientific officer of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Previously, he was Leon Hess Professor of Virology and vice president for academic programs at The Rockefeller University. He was at that university since 1957, where he began as a postdoctoral fellow. He became a professor in 1970. His research has been on the structure, replication, and mechanisms of pathogenesis of myxoviruses and paramyxoviruses; the structure and function of viral membranes; and viral-cell membrane interactions. He received an M.D. degree from Louisiana State University, and his residency training in internal medicine at Barnes Hospital, Washington University, St. Louis. THEODORE C.EICKHOFF has been director of Internal Medicine at Presbyterian St. Luke’s Medical Center and professor of medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver, since 1981. From 1968 to 1981 he was head of the Division of Infectious Disease at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. He has participated in a number of vaccine development and evaluation studies, and is a member of the American College of Physicians’ Immunization Advisory Committee. Presently, he is chairman of the Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee, National Center for Drugs and Biologics, Food and Drug Administration, and is president of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. He received his M.D. degree from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and conducted his internal medicine residency and infectious disease fellowship training at the Harvard Medical Unit, Boston City Hospital. FRANCIS A.ENNIS has been a professor of medicine and of molecular genetics and microbiology at the University of Massachusetts Medical School since 1982. From 1973 to 1981, he was director of the Division of Virology at the Bureau of Biologics in the Food and Drug Administration, and from 1970 to 1973 he was co-director of the Division of Infectious Diseases at Boston University Medical School. His research interests concern immune responses to virus infections and vaccines. He has an A.B. degree from Boston College and an M.D. degree from Tufts University. HARVEY V.FINEBERG became dean at the Harvard School of Public Health in 1984 and had been a faculty member there since 1973. His research interests include the innovation and diffusion of new medical technology, the evaluation of medical practices, the application of decision sciences to health care, and the interface between medical science and public policy. He holds A.B., M.D., and Ph.D. degrees from Harvard.

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New Vaccine Development: Establishing Priorities, Volume II, Diseases of Importance in Developing Countries MAURICE R.HILLEMAN is director, Merck Institute for Therapeutic Research, Merck Sharp & Dohme Research Laboratories, where he also has held the positions of senior vice president and director of virus and cell biology research. From 1948 to 1958 he was chief of viral respiratory disease research at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research; prior to that, he was chief of viral diseases at E.R.Squibb & Sons. He holds an adjunct professorship in pediatrics in the School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and had prior appointments at the University of Maryland and Rutgers University. Dr. Hilleman has had a long career in academia, government, and industry and has engaged in a wide variety of basic and applied research activities in virology, immunology, epidemiology, vaccine development, and clinical evaluation. He has served as a long-term advisor to the U.S. government and the World Health Organization. He holds a Ph.D. degree from the University of Chicago in Microbiology and Virology. GERALD T.KEUSCH has been professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Geographic Medicine, Department of Medicine, at Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, since 1979. Prior to that, he was assistant and then associate professor of medicine at Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York. He has been interested in the pathogenesis of diarrheal diseases and in the interaction of malnutrition and infection, and has worked in both the laboratory and the field in developing countries. He has an M.D. degree from Harvard Medical School and an A.B. from Columbia College. RICHARD F.KINGHAM is a partner in the Washington, D.C., law firm of Covington & Burling. Since joining the firm in 1973, he has specialized in federal regulation of foods, drugs, and related products. He was involved in contract negotiations and legislative drafting in connection with the 1976 swine flu immunization program and subsequently participated in a number of proceedings relating to federal regulation of vaccines and proposals for vaccine injury compensation systems. He has served as a lecturer at the University of Virginia Law School since 1977, most recently teaching seminars in food and drug law and administrative law. He holds a J.D. degree from the University of Virginia and a B.A. degree from George Washington University. BERNARD ROIZMAN is the Joseph Regenstein Distinguished Service Professor in the Department of Molecular Genetics and Cell Biology and chairman of the Committee on Virology at the University of Chicago, where he has been on the faculty since 1965. Prior to that he was on the faculty of Johns Hopkins University. His scientific interests center on the molecular biology of herpesviruses. He has been on the editorial board of numerous scientific journals and served as a member or chairman of advisory and review panels for the American Cancer Society, the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, the Leukemia Research Foundation, the International Committee for Taxonomy of Viruses, the International Microbial Commission, Emory University, Northwestern University, Showa University, the Sloan

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New Vaccine Development: Establishing Priorities, Volume II, Diseases of Importance in Developing Countries Kettering Institute, the Goodwin Institute for Cancer Research, the Institute Merieux, and others. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and holds a Sc.D. from Johns Hopkins University. HENRY R.SHINEFIELD is chief of pediatrics at the Kaiser Permanente Medical Center in San Francisco and clinical professor of pediatrics at the University of California School of Medicine in San Francisco. He has served as a member or chairman of many committees on infectious disease, anti-infective agents, and vaccines for the National Institutes of Health and the Food and Drug Administration. He is a member of national and regional medical, pediatric, and infectious diseases societies, and has served as a consultant or as a member of the editorial boards of pediatric and infectious diseases journals. JANE E.SISK is a project director in the Health Program of the Congressional Office of Technology Assessment (OTA), a position she has held since 1981. She has recently completed a project on the medical devices industry and previously worked on studies of federal vaccine policies and on cost-effectiveness analyses of influenza and pneumococcal vaccines. From 1978 to 1981, she was a Veterans Administration scholar based at the National Center for Health Services Research, where she examined the use of medical technologies under different financing and organizational arrangements. She received a Ph.D. in economics from McGill University and a B.A. in international relations from Brown University. CLADD E.STEVENS became head of the Laboratory of Epidemiology of The New York Blood Center in 1981. For the preceding seven years, she had worked in that laboratory with the late Wolf Szmuness, following 2 years in Taiwan as a postdoctoral fellow. Her research on the epidemiology of viral hepatitis has included extensive experience in efficacy trials of hepatitis B vaccine. She has an M.D. degree from Baylor College of Medicine and an M.P.H. degree from the University of Washington. LEROY WALTERS has been director of the Center for Bioethics at the Kennedy Institute of Ethics, Georgetown University, since 1971. He is also an associate professor of philosophy at Georgetown and has served on numerous national committees and advisory panels, including the Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee, National Institutes of Health, and the National Council on Health Care Technology, Department of Health and Human Services. He is editor of the Bibliography of Bioethics (Vol. 1–9), co-editor of Contemporary Issues in Bioethics, and the author of many articles on ethical issues in biomedical research. He is also a member of the editorial boards of the Journal of Medicine and Philosophy, IVF: The Journal of In Vitro Fertilization and Embryo Transfer, and the American Journal of Reproductive Immunology. He has a M. Phil, degree and a Ph.D. in Religious Studies (Ethics) from Yale University.

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New Vaccine Development: Establishing Priorities, Volume II, Diseases of Importance in Developing Countries MILTON C.WEINSTEIN is professor of policy and decision sciences at the Harvard School of Public Health, a position he has held since 1980. He teaches decision analysis, health economics, and quantitative methods to students of medicine, health policy and management, and biostatistics. His research activities center around methods for evaluation of medical practices and technologies, and for resource allocation in health care and health science research. He is principal author of two books, Hypertension: A Policy Perspective, and Clinical Decision Analysis. He was president of the Society for Medical Decision Making for 1984–1985. He holds A.B. and A.M. degrees in applied mathematics from Harvard University, and M.P.P and Ph.D. degrees in public policy analysis from the John F.Kennedy School of Government.