APPENDIX D

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF COMMITTEE MEMBERS AND CONSULTANTS

AHEARNE, John F.—Dr. Ahearne received his B.S. and M.S. degrees from Cornell University and his Ph.D. in plasma physics from Princeton University. He has served as commissioner and chairman of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, system analyst for the White House Energy Office, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy, and Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for Defense. He currently is the director of the Sigma Xi Center for Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Society, and a lecturer in public policy at Duke University. Dr. Ahearne is a member of the Department of Energy's Environmental Management Advisory Board and the National Research Council's Board on Radioactive Waste Management, and has served on a number of the National Research Council's committees examining issues in risk assessment. His professional interests are reactor safety, energy issues, resource allocation, and public policy management. He is a fellow of the American Physics Society, American Association for the Advancement of Science, and American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is a member of Sigma Xi, the Society for Risk Analysis, the American Nuclear Society, and the National Academy of Engineers.

ARNETT, Edward M.—Dr. Arnett earned a B.A., M.S., and Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of Pennsylvania. He is professor emeritus of chemistry at Duke University and has held prior professorships at the University of Pittsburgh and Western Maryland College. His expertise is in organic and physical organic chemistry. He is a Guggenheim fellow and has received numerous awards, including most recently the Arthur C. Cope Scholar Award and the American Institute of Chemists Distinguished North Carolina Chemist Award. Dr. Arnett is a member of the National Academy of Sciences.

AUERBACH, Stanley I.—Dr. Auerbach earned his B.S. and M.S. from the University of Illinois, and his Ph.D. in zoology from Northwestern University. Dr. Auerbach retired as director of the Environmental Sciences Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 1990. His research interests



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BUILDING AN EFFECTIVE ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SCIENCE PROGRAM:: INITIAL ASSESSMENT APPENDIX D BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF COMMITTEE MEMBERS AND CONSULTANTS AHEARNE, John F.—Dr. Ahearne received his B.S. and M.S. degrees from Cornell University and his Ph.D. in plasma physics from Princeton University. He has served as commissioner and chairman of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, system analyst for the White House Energy Office, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy, and Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for Defense. He currently is the director of the Sigma Xi Center for Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Society, and a lecturer in public policy at Duke University. Dr. Ahearne is a member of the Department of Energy's Environmental Management Advisory Board and the National Research Council's Board on Radioactive Waste Management, and has served on a number of the National Research Council's committees examining issues in risk assessment. His professional interests are reactor safety, energy issues, resource allocation, and public policy management. He is a fellow of the American Physics Society, American Association for the Advancement of Science, and American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is a member of Sigma Xi, the Society for Risk Analysis, the American Nuclear Society, and the National Academy of Engineers. ARNETT, Edward M.—Dr. Arnett earned a B.A., M.S., and Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of Pennsylvania. He is professor emeritus of chemistry at Duke University and has held prior professorships at the University of Pittsburgh and Western Maryland College. His expertise is in organic and physical organic chemistry. He is a Guggenheim fellow and has received numerous awards, including most recently the Arthur C. Cope Scholar Award and the American Institute of Chemists Distinguished North Carolina Chemist Award. Dr. Arnett is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. AUERBACH, Stanley I.—Dr. Auerbach earned his B.S. and M.S. from the University of Illinois, and his Ph.D. in zoology from Northwestern University. Dr. Auerbach retired as director of the Environmental Sciences Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 1990. His research interests

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BUILDING AN EFFECTIVE ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SCIENCE PROGRAM:: INITIAL ASSESSMENT include radiation ecology ecosystem analysis and radioactive waste cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. Dr. Auerbach's former academic positions include lecturer and adjunct professor at the University of Tennessee and visiting professor at the University of Georgia. He has served on or chaired several National Research Council committees, boards, and commissions since 1961. He is a member of the American Institute for Biological Science, American Association for the Advancement of Science, Ecological Society of America, British Ecological Society, International Union of Radioecologists, and Health Physics Society. BOUWER, Edward J.—Dr. Bouwer received his B.S.C.E. from Arizona State University in civil engineering and his M.S. and Ph.D. in environmental engineering and science from Stanford University. He is currently a professor of environmental engineering at Johns Hopkins University. His research interests include biodegradation of hazardous organic chemicals in the subsurface, biofilm kinetics, water and waste treatment processes, and transport and fate of bacteria in porous media. He serves on the board of directors for the Association of Environmental Engineering Professors and on the editorial boards for The Journal of Contaminant Hydrology and Biodegradation. He has served on three past National Research Council committees. BRAUMAN, John I.—Dr. Brauman earned a B.S. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of California at Berkeley. Dr. Brauman is the J.G. Jackson–C.J. Wood Professor of Chemistry at Stanford University. He began his career at Stanford University in 1963 as an assistant professor. His research interests include physical and organic chemistry, gas phase ionic reactions, electron photodetachment spectroscopy, and reaction mechanisms. He is the recipient of many awards from the American Chemical Society, including the Award in Pure Chemistry, the James Flack Norris Award in Physical Organic Chemistry, and the Arthur C. Cope Scholar Award. Dr. Brauman is a Guggenheim fellow and an honorary fellow of the California Academy of Sciences; he is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Chemical Society. He has served on several National Research Council committees.

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BUILDING AN EFFECTIVE ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SCIENCE PROGRAM:: INITIAL ASSESSMENT HARLEY, Naomi H.—Dr. Harley holds a B.E. in electrical engineering from the Cooper Union and an APC in management from the New York University Graduate Business School. She received an M.E. in nuclear engineering and a Ph.D. in radiological physics from New York University. Dr. Harley is a research professor of environmental medicine at the New York University Medical Center where she also serves on the Medical Isotopes Committee. Her expertise is in radiation carcinogenesis, and her major research interests include measurement of inhaled or ingested radionuclides, modeling of their fate within the human body, and the calculation of the detailed radiation dose to the cells specific to carcinogenesis. She is a member of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements and an adviser to the U.S. Delegation of the United Nations Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation. Dr. Harley is a member of the editorial board of Environment International, and a fellow of the Health Physics Society; she holds three patents at New York University for radiation detection devices. LOVLEY, Derek R.—Dr. Lovley received a B.A. in biological sciences from the University of Connecticut, an M.A. from Clark University, and a Ph.D. in microbiology from Michigan State University. He is a professor of microbiology at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. His research interests comprise the physiology and ecology of novel anaerobic microorganisms, molecular analysis of anaerobic microbial communities, and bioremediation of metal and organic contamination. He is an associate editor for Anaerobe and is on the editorial boards of Applied and Environmental Microbiology, Microbial Ecology, and FEMS Microbiology Ecology. MANNELLA, Gene G.—Dr. Mannella earned a B.S. from Case Institute of Technology and a Ph.D. in chemical engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He retired in 1994 as senior vice president of business operations, at the Gas Research Institute, headquartered in Chicago. He has also served as director of the Washington office of the Electric Power Research Institute, vice–president and general manager of Mechanical Technology, Inc., and senior vice–president at the Institute of Gas Technology. Dr. Mannella has held several positions in government agencies including the National Aeronautics and Space Administration,

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BUILDING AN EFFECTIVE ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SCIENCE PROGRAM:: INITIAL ASSESSMENT Department of Transportation, and Energy Research and Development Administration (predecessor to the Department of Energy). He has authored numerous technical papers and served on several committees and boards including the Washington Coal Club. NOONAN, Norine E.—Dr. Noonan received her B.A. from the University of Vermont, summa cum laude, in zoology/chemistry, and her M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in cell biology and biochemistry from Princeton University. She is vice president for research and dean of the Graduate School at Florida Institute of Technology in Melbourne. Prior to joining Florida Tech in October 1992, Dr. Noonan was chief of the Science and Space Programs Branch of the Energy and Science Division, Office of Management and Budget. In this capacity, she was responsible for the legislative programs and combined budgets. Before becoming branch chief, Dr. Noonan was senior budget and program analyst for the branch for four years. She was an American Chemical Society Congressional Science Fellow for the United States Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation; a research associate professor of biochemistry at Georgetown University School of Medicine; an expert consultant for the Subcommittee on Science Research and Technology; and associate professor of physiological sciences at the University of Florida, College of Veterinary Medicine. Dr. Noonan is a member and fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and is also a member of the American Society for Cell Biology, Sigma Xi, and Phi Beta Kappa. SILVER, Leon T.—Dr. Silver earned a B.S. in civil engineering from the University of Colorado, an M.S. in geology from the University of New Mexico, and a Ph.D. from the California Institute of Technology. He is the W.M. Keck Foundation Professor for Resource Geology at the California Institute of Technology (CalTech) and his expertise is in petrology and geochemistry. Dr. Silver was a public works officer in the U.S. Naval Civil Engineer Corps from 1945 to 1946 and held several positions at the United States Geological Survey before he joined CalTech. He has served on numerous National Research Council committees, including his current membership of the Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Applications. Dr. Silver is a member of the National Academy of Sciences.

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BUILDING AN EFFECTIVE ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SCIENCE PROGRAM:: INITIAL ASSESSMENT CONSULTANTS CHOPPIN, Gregory R.—Dr. Choppin received a B.S. in chemistry from Loyola University, New Orleans, and a Ph.D. from the University of Texas, Austin. He is currently the R.O. Lawton Distinguished Professor of Chemistry at Florida State University. His research interests involve the chemistry of the f–elements, the separation science of the f–elements, and concentrated electrolyte solutions. During a postdoctoral period at the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, he participated in the discovery of mendelevium, element 101. His research and educational activities have been recognized by the American Chemical Society Award in Nuclear Chemistry, the Southern Chemist Award of the American Chemical Society, the Manufacturing Chemist Award in Chemical Education, a Presidential Citation Award of the American Nuclear Society, and honorary D.Sc. degrees from Loyola University and the Chalmers University of Technology (Sweden). DEPAOLO, Donald J.—Dr. DePaolo earned a B.S. with honors from the State University of New York, Binghamton, and a Ph.D. from the California Institute of Technology. He is professor of geochemistry and director of the Center for Isotope Geochemistry at the University of California, Berkeley. Prior to arriving at Berkeley in 1988, Dr. DePaolo held a professorship at the University of California, Los Angeles. He is a recipient of the F.W. Clarke Medal of the Geochemical Society, the J.B. MacElwane Award of the Geophysical Union, and the Mineralogical Society of America Award. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. HORNBERGER, George M.—Dr. Hornberger received an undergraduate degree in civil engineering, but subsequently trained as a hydrologist at Stanford University, where he was awarded a Ph.D. in 1970. Dr. Hornberger is currently the Ernest H. Ern Professor of Environmental Sciences at the University of Virginia. He joined the University of Virginia's Environmental Sciences Department in 1970 and served as department chairman from 1979 to 1984. Dr. Hornberger has been the recipient of numerous awards, including election to the first group of fellows of the Association for Women in Science. He was cited for “exemplary commitment to the achievement of equity for women in science

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BUILDING AN EFFECTIVE ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SCIENCE PROGRAM:: INITIAL ASSESSMENT and technology.” Dr. Hornberger received the John Wesley Powell Award from the U.S. Geological Survey and is also a member of the American Geophysical Union. He is the editor of Water Resources Research, the nation's premier journal for publications in the hydrological sciences. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1996.