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Appendix D Biographical Sketches, Pane! Members and Staff ALFRED BLUMSTEIN is I. Erik lonsson professor of Urban Systems and Operations Research ant! director of the Urban Systems Institute in the School of Urban and Public Affairs, Carnegie-Mellon University. He also serves as the chair of the Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency, the state criminal justice planning agency for Pennsylvania. He server] as director of the Task Force on Science and Technology for the Presiclent's Commission on Law Enforcement and the Administration of Justice (196~1967), as chair of the National Research CounciT's Committee on Research on Law Enforcement ant! the Administration of Justice (1981-1984), ant! as chair of that committee's panels on research on deterrent ant! incapacitative effects (197~1978) and on sentencing (198~19821. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and of the American Society of Criminology and is a member of the Scientific Committee of the International Society of Criminology. He has been president ofthe Operations Research Society of America (1977-1978) ant! was recently awarcled its Kimball Mecial. He is an associate editor of several journals in operations research and in criminology. He receiver! a bachelor's degree in engineering physics and a Ph.D. degree in operations research, both from Cornell University. ALLEN H. ANDREWS, JR., is superintendent of police of Peoria, Illinois. He has served on many professional advisory panels, including the Law Enforcement Assist- ance Aciministration's National Advisory Committee on Criminal Justice Stanclarcis ant] Goals, the Bureau of Justice Statistics' Advisory Panel on the National Crime Survey Redesign, and the Advisory Pane] to the Federal Bureau of Investigation on the Uniform Crime Report redesign. He was also appointed by the governor to serve as executive director of the Illinois Law Enforcement Commission, ant! he was a U.S. clelegate to the Fifth United Nations Congress on the Prevention of Crime and Treatment of Offenders. He is a member of the Illinois Association of Chiefs of Police, the Central Illinois Police Training Center Board of Directors, and the Police Executive Research Forum and is vice-chair of the YMCA Boars! of Directors in Peoria, Illinois. 423

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424 CRIMINAL CAREERS AND CAREER CRIMINALS He received an A.B. clegree in political science from the University of Illinois and an M.S. degree in law enforcement and public safety administration from Michigan State University. DELBERT S. ELLIOTT is director of the Behavioral Research Institute and professor of sociology at the University of Colorado. His research concerns adolescent problem behavior (delinquency, drug use, runaway, mental health problems), domestic vio- lence, and the evaluation of delinquency prevention and treatment programs. He is coauthor of Delinquency and Dropout (1974~?~ The Social Psychology of Runaway (1978), and Explaining Delinquency and Drag Use (19851. He served as chair of the Crime and Violent Behavior Review Committee for the National Institute of Mental Health (198~19861. He is a member of the American Society of Criminology and the American Sociological Association. He received a B.A. degree from Pomona College and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Washington, all in sociology. DAVID P. FARRINGTON is lecturer in criminology at Cambridge University, En- gland. His major research interest is in the longitudinal study of delinquency and crime, and he has also published empirical research on victimization and police recording of crime, observing shoplifting, prison overcrowding, magistrates' sentencing, juvenile diversion, and the experimental study of stealing. He has authored or edited eight books, the most recent being Prediction in Criminology (1985), Reactions to Crime (1985), Aggression and Dangerousness (1985), and Understanding and Controlling Crime (19861. In 1984 he received the Sellin-Glueck Awarc] of the American Society of Criminology. He is chair of the Division of Criminological and Legal Psychology of the British Psychological Society and a member of the National Parole Board of Englanc! and Wales. He was on the organizing committee of the British Society of Criminology and is currently on the editorial boards of several journals. He received B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. degrees in experimental psychology from Cambridge University. JOHN KAPLAN is the Jackson Eli Reynolds professor of law at the Stanford University Law School. His fields are criminal law, evidence, and criminology. He has written on a variety of topics in the criminal justice system, including work on drug control. He is the author of Marijuana: The New Prohibition (1970), Criminal Justice (1973, with Jerome SkoInick), The Hardest Drug: Heroin and Public Policy (1983), among other works. He received an A.B. degree in physics and an L.L.B. degree, both from Harvard University. ROLF LOEBER is assistant professor in psychiatry at the Westem Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, School of Meclicine, University of Pittsburgh. He is also codirector of the Child Conduct Problem Program. His research and publications reflect his interest in the early part of criminal careers, the development of conduct problems in children, famflial influences, and the predictabflity of delinquent behavior over time. He received an M.A. degree from the University of Amsterdam in Holland in clinical psychology and a Ph.D. degree in clinical psychology from Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. CHARLES F. MANSKI is professor of economics at the University of Wisconsin. His research concerns econometric methods and empirical economics, with emphasis on

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APPENDIX D BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 425 the analysis of individual-choice behavior. He is coauthor of College Choice in America (1983, with D. Wise) and coeditor of Structural Analysis of Discrete Data (1980, with D. McFadden). He is a fellow of the Econometric Society. He received B.S. and Ph.D. degrees in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. NORVAL MORRIS is Julius Kreegerprofessor of law and criminology at the University of Chicago, and he previously served as dean ofthe Law School. His research concerns the criminal justice system. He is the author of The Future of Imprisonment (1974) and Madness and the Criminal Law (1982~. He is a fellow of the American Bar Foundation, a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, of the Police Board of the City of Chicago, and of the Board of Governors of-the Chicago Bar Foundation. He receiver] L.L.B. and L.L.M. degrees from the University of Melbourne, Australia, ant! a Ph.D. degree in law and criminology from the University of London. ALBERT l. REISS, JR., is the William Graham Sumner professor of sociology at the Institution for Social and Police Studies and a lecturer in law at Yale University. He has served as a consultant to the President's Commission on Law Enforcement ant! the Administration of Justice (1966-1967), the National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders (1967-1968), and the National Commission for the Protection of Human Subjects in Biomedical and Behavioral Research (19761. Under presidential appoint- ment, he server! as a member of the National Advisory Commission on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (197~19781. He is a past president of the American Society of Criminology and is serving as president of the Scientific Commission of the International Society of Criminology. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Statistical Association, and the American Society of Criminology. He has authored or edited 12 books including Social Characteristics of Urban and Rural Communities (1950, with O. Duncan), The Police and the Public (1971), Indicators of Crime and Criminal~ustice: Quantitative Studies (1980, with S. Fienberg), and Communities and Crime (1986, with M. Tonry). He received a Ph.D. degree in sociology from the University of Chicago, an L.L.D. (honoris cause) degree from the City University of New York, and a Docteur Honoris Causa from the Universite de Montreal. LEE N. ROBINS is professor of sociology in psychiatry at the Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis. Her research has centered on childhood predictors of antisocial personality, alcohol and drug abuse, and on the rates of mental disorder in the community. She is a fellow of the American College of Epidemiology and a member of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology, the American Psychopathological Association, and the Institute of Medicine. She received B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. degrees in sociology from Radcliffe College (Harvard University). HAROLD M. ROSE is professor of geography and urban affairs at the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee. His research is concemec3 with the black homicide risk in urban environments and patterns of black residential change. He is a member of the Association of American Geographers and the Population Association of America, anc! he is on the editorial boards of Urban Geography and Urban Affairs Quarterly. He received a B.S. degree from Tennessee State University and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in geography from Ohio State University.

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426 CRIMINAL CAREERS AND CAREER CRIMINALS DANIEL SCOTT SMITH is professor of history at the University of Illinois, Chicago. His research involves historical demography, social history, and quantitative methods. He is the editor of Historical Methods and is a member of the Social Science History Association, the Population Association of America, and the American Historical Association. He received a B.A. degree from the University of Florida and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in history from the University of Califomia at Berkeley. ANDREW L. SONNER is State's AKomey for Montgomery County, Maryland, now serving his fourth elected term. He is a past vice-president of the National District AKomeys Association and has also served as a member of the executive committee of the board of directors. He has been president of the Maryland State's AKomeys' Association and is currently a member of its board of directors and he has served as a member of the Govemor's Commission on Law Enforcement and the Administration of Justice. He designed and implemented "Operation Last Chance," an alternative sentencing program for juvenile offenders that received the National Association of Counties Achievement Awarc! in 1984. He has held a number of positions in the American Bar Association and is currently a member of the Criminal Justice Section Council. He is the author of several articles on criminal law and procedure. He received B.A. and I.D. degrees from the American University. REGGIE B. WALTON is an associate judge of the Superior Court of the District of Columbia. Previously, he was an Assistant U.S. AKomey for the District of Columbia anct a staff aKomey with the Philadelphia Defender Association. He is a member of the loins Committee on Judicial Administration for the District of Columbia Courts, a member of the executive committee of the District of Columbia Counsel for Court Excellence, and a member of the D.C. Bar Association Criminal Instructions Commit- tee. He received a B.A. degree in political science from West Virginia State College and a [.D. degree from Washington College of Law, the American University. NAMES Q. WILSON is the Shattuck professor of government at Harvard University and the Collins professor of management at the University of California, Los Angeles. He is the author of several books on crime and law enforcement, including Crime and Human Nature (1985, with Richard I. Herrnstein), Thinking About Crime (revised edition, 1983), The Investigators (1978), and Varieties of Police Behavior (1966), and is editor of Crime and Public Policy (19831. He is chair of the boars! of directors of the Police Foundation ancl has served as a member of the Science Advisory Committee to the Presiclent's Commission on Law Enforcement and Administration of Justice (1966), chair of the National Advisory Council for Drug Abuse Prevention (197~1973), and member of the Attorney General's Task Force on Violent Crime (19811. He received a B.A. degree from the University of RedIands and a Ph.D. degree in political science from the University of Chicago. MARVIN E. WOLFGANG is professor of criminology and law and director of the Sellin Center for Studies in Criminology and Criminal Law at the University of Pennsylvania. He is currently the president of the American Academy of Political and Social Science. He has been president of the American Society of Criminology; associate secretary general of the International Society of Criminology; a consultant to the President's Commission on Law Enforcement and Administration of Justice; a member ofthe Pane!

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APPENDIX D: BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 427 on Social Indicators of the Department of Health, Education, ant! Welfare; director of research, Commission on the Causes and Prevention of Violence; member, Acivisor,v Committee on Reform of the Federal Criminal Law; and member, National Commis- sion on Obscenity and Pornography. He has authored! or edited 11 books, including Patterns in Criminal Homicide (19581; The Measurement of Delinquency (with T. Sellin, 19641; Delinquency in a Birth Cohort (with R. Figlio ant! T. Sellin, 19721; and Criminal Violence (with N. Weiner, 19821. He receiver! M.A. ant! Ph.D. degrees in sociology from the University of Pennsylvania. JEFFREY A. ROTH, who served as the panel's study director, is the senior staffofficer of the Committee on Research on Law Enforcement-anc! the Administration of Justice. His interest is in the policy use of social research, especially in the areas of criminal careers, taxpayer compliance, and pretrial release. He is a member of the American Society of Criminology, the Law & Society Association, the American Economic Association, and the American Statistical Association. He receiver! B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. degrees in economics from Michigan State University. CHRISTY A. VISHER, who worked with the pane} as a National Research Council Fellow, is research associate with the Committee on Research on Law Enforcement and the Administration of Justice. Her research is concerned with criminal careers, juro decision making, police arrest decisions, ant! public policy issues in criminal justice. She is a member of the American Sociological Association, the American Society of Criminology, and the Law & Society Association. She received a B.A. degree from Trinity University and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in sociology from Indiana University. JACQUELINE COHEN, who served as consultant to the panel, is associate director of the Urban Systems Institute and research associate in the School of Urban ant] Public Affairs, Camegie-Mellon University. Her research concerns quantitative methods (inclucling econometrics ant! stochastic processes), criminal careers, and incapacitation. She is a member of the Law & Society Association, the American Society of Criminol- ogy, the American Sociological Association, and the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences. She received B.S. and M.A. degrees from the University of Pittsburgh ant] a Ph.D. degree in urban and public affairs from Camegie-Mellon University.

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