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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF BOARD MEMBERS AND STAFF JOSEPH F. ALIBRANDI is chair of the board of directors and chief executive of Whittaker Corporation and a director of Se- curity Pacific Corporation and Security Pacific National Bank, Santa Fe Pacific Corporation, Catellus Development Corpora- tion, and Jacobs Engineering Group. Prior to joining Whittaker, he was associated with the Raytheon Company for IS years, lastly as senior vice president. He is the former chair of the California Business Roundtable Task Force on Education. He also served as chair of the Twelfth District Federal Reserve Bank and chair of the international Policy Committee of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. He is a member of the advisory board of Policy Analysis for California Education, cochair of "Kids First," and director of the Institute for Contemporary Studies. He received a B.S. degree in mechanical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a D.S. de- gree in business administration from Bryant College. GORDON M. AMBACH is executive director of the Council of Chief State School Officers, which represents state-level in- terests in education and provides advocacy for their state and national education policy positions. Previously he served for 10 years as the New York State Commissioner of Education and President of the University of the State of New York. He also held appointments with the U.S. Office of Education in legislation and program planning. His advisory roles include membership on commissions and panels on learning technol- ogy, job training, the arts, and education statistics and assessment. He is currently the U.S. representative to the General Assem- bly of the International Association for the Evaluation of Edu- cational Achievement. His professional interests have centered on policy making and legislative development. He has a B.A. degree from Yale University and an M.A. degree in teaching from Harvard University. 36

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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 37 NORMAN M. BRADBURN is director of the National Opinion Research Council, the Tiffany and Margaret Blake distinguished service professor in the department of psychology, and a mem- ber of the faculties of the graduate school of business and the Harris School of Public Policy Studies, all at the University of Chicago. Previously, he served as provost of the University of Chicago. A survey methodologist, Bradburn chairs the U.S. Board on international Comparative Studies in Education and is a member of the Committee on National Statistics at the National Research Council. He is president-elect of the Ameri- can Association of Public Opinion Research and is a fellow of the American Statistical Association, the international Statistical Association, and the American Association for the Advance- ment of Science. Bradburn received B.A. degrees from the University of Chicago and Magdalen College, Oxford University, and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in psychology from Harvard Uni- versity. ROBERTO M. FERNANDEZ is associate professor of sociology and a research faculty member of the Center for Urban Affairs and Policy Research at Northwestern University. Previously he served as assistant professor of sociology at the University of Arizona. His research interests include the areas of formal organizations, race and ethnic relations, and sociology of eclu- cation. His research on education focuses on the determinants of underachievement among Hispanic youth in schools and the labor market. He has been honored by fellowships from the National Science Foundation, Rockefeller Foundation, Social Science Research Council, and National Academy of Education. He has served on numerous advisory committees for various foundations and federal agencies in addition to three commit- tees of the National Research Council. He received a B.A. degree from Harvard College and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Chicago in sociology. DOROTHY M. GILFORD is director of the National Research Council's Board on international Comparative Studies in Edu- cation. Formerly she served as director of the National Center for Education Statistics and as director of the mathematical sciences division of the Office of Naval Research. Her interests are in research program administration, organization of statis-

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38 INTERNATIONAL COMPARATIVE STUDIES OF EDUCATION tical systems, and education statistics. A fellow of the Ameri- can Statistical Association, she has served as vice president of the association, chair of its committee on fellows, and chair of its committee on international relations in statistics. She Is a member of the International Statistics Institute. She received B.S. and M.S. degrees in mathematics from the University of Washington. JAMES W. GUTHRIE is codirector of Policy Analysis for Cali- fornia Education (PACE) and professor of education at the University of California at Berkeley. Before joining the Uni- versity of California faculty, Guthrie was the education specialist in the United States Senate. His research interests include edu- cational policy, school finance and governance, and the reform of educational systems. His publications include books on school finance, educational administration, strategic planning, and teacher education. He has served as vice president of the American Educational Research Association and currently edits that organization's journal, Educalional Evaluation and Policy Analy- sis. He has been honored as an Alfred North Whitehead postdoctoral fellow at Harvard University, visiting fellow at the department of educational studies of Oxford University, and in 1990 was named as the American Education Research Association's first senior fellow. He received B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. degrees from Stanford University. EDWARD H. HAERTEL is associate professor of education at Stanford University. His research interests center on psycho- metrics and assessment policy, especially large-scale assessments. He has worked with the National Center for Education Statistics; the National Assessment Governing Board; the Center for Re- search on Evaluation, Standards, and Student Testing; and other public and private organizations on issues concerning the Na- tional Assessment of Educational Progress, and with the state of California on issues concerning the California Assessment Program. He received a B.A. degree in mathematics from the University of Wisconsin and a Ph.D. in education from the University of Chicago. MORRIS H. HANSEN (deceased, October 1990) was chair of the board of Westat, Inc., and an authority on sample survey

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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 39 design and the conduct of surveys. He joined Westat in 1968 and took a lead role in the design and conduct of many sur- veys and on the application of statistical quality control meth- ods in welfare programs. Formerly he was associate director of the Bureau of the Census, where he was responsible for the research and development program. He served as president of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics, the American Statistical Association, and the International Association of Survey Statis- ticians. He was an honorary fellow of the Royal Statistical Society and a member of the National Academy of Sciences. He received a B.S. degree in accounting from the University of Wyoming, an M.A. degree in statistics from American Univer- sity, and an honorary degree of doctor of laws from the University of Wyoming. STEPHEN P. HEYNEMAN is the division chief for population and human resources in the technical department in the Eu- rope, Middle East, and North Africa Region of the World Bank. His division's responsibility includes policies on education, health, family planning and nutrition. He has been using interna- tional surveys of academic achievement to study problems of educational quality since his first project in Uganda in 1970, and he has worked on educational problems in many developed and developing countries. His other research interests include higher education finance and management, policy reforms in vocational education, examination reforms and standarclized testing, cognitive skills, and economic productivity. He is the president-elect of the Comparative and international Education Society. He received a B.A. degree from the University of California at Berkeley, an M.A. degree from the University of California at Los Angeles, anc} a Ph.D. degree from the Universitv of Chicano in comparative education. , -- O- DANIEL G. HORVITZ is distinguished institute scientist at the Research Triangle institute where he has also been executive vice president and vice president for statistical sciences. His research interests are in survey design and methods with em- phasis on cost-effective ways to improve data quality. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Statistical Association, which he has served as vice president, and a member of the international

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40 INTERNATIONAL COMPARATIVE STUDIES OF EDUCATION Statistical Institute. He received a B.S. degree from the Uni- versity of Massachusetts and a Ph.D. degree in statistics from Iowa State University. LYLE V. JONES is professor of psychology and director of the L. L. Thurstone Psychometric Laboratory at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, where he has served as vice chan- cellor and dean of the graduate school. Formerly he was a faculty member at the University of Chicago and has held vis- iting faculty appointments at the universities of Illinois, Texas, and Washington. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine, a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and a former president of the Association of Graduate Schools, the Psychometric Society, and the Division of Evaluation and Mea- surement of the American Psychological Association. He has served as a member of several boards, commissions, and com- mittees of the National Research Council. Among his recent publications are several that focus on differential trends in U.S. school achievement for black and white students. He received B.S. and M.S. degrees from the University of Washington and a Ph.D. degree from Stanford University. LAURA LATHROP is research assistant to the board. She has served as an educational consultant to various organizations abroad as well as to the U.S. Department of Labor and the University of Maryland. She received a B.A. in psychology from Hollins College, an M.A. degree in education from Inter- American University in Puerto Rico, and a Ph.D. degree in human development and anthropology from the University of Maryland. GAEA T~EINHARDT is a senior scientist at the Learning Re- search and Development Center and professor of education at the University of Pittsburgh. She has directed projects on pro- gram evaluation, teacher assessment, and teacher expertise in mathematics and history. Her research interests focus on classroom instruction and learning in specific subject areas as well as in understanding how instructional explanations are constructed and when they are effective. She has worked on the design of innovative assessment techniques for teachers and students for the National Board of Professional Teacher Standarcis and sev-

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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 41 eral state departments of education. She received a B.A. de- gree in Russian civilization and an M.S. degree in urban education from the University of Chicago and a Ph.D. degree in research methodology from the University of Pittsburgh. JOHN SCHWILLE is professor and assistant dean for interna- tional studies at the College of Education at Michigan State University. His experience includes qualitative as well as quantitative educational research in both international and U.S. domestic settings. His involvement in international assessment dates from 1972 when he received a Spencer Fellowship at Stockholm University for analysis of data collected by the In- ternational Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement. His most recent field research has dealt with primary school effectiveness issues in Burundi. He received a B.A. degree in the history of France from Harvard University and a Ph.D. degree in comparative sociology of education from the University of Chicago. FLORALINE I. STEVENS is director of the Program Evaluation and Assessment Branch for the Los Angeles Unified School District and adjunct assistant professor of tests and measure- ments at the California State University, Los Angeles. Her interests are program evaluation and research issues focused on at-risk students. She served as vice president for the division on School Evaluation and Program Development of the American Educational Research Association (AERA), chair of the Research Steering Committee for the Council of Great City Schools, and chair of the School Research Directors at AERA. She currently serves on the National Indicators Pane} for the U.S. Department of Education. She received a B.S. degree from the University of Southern California and M.Ed. and Ed.D. degrees from the University of California at Los Angeles. JUDITH TORNEY-PURTA is professor of human development and affiliate professor of psychology at the University of Maryland, specializing in applied developmental and educational psychology. Formerly she was professor of psychology at the University of Illinois at Chicago. She was the senior author of the Interna- tional Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achieve- ment volume reporting the 10-country study of civic education.

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42 INTERNATIONAL COMPARATIVE STUDIES OF EDUCATION She has served on the Fulbright Senior Scholar Selection Pane] in Psychology and as chair of the International Relations Com- mittee of the American Educational Research Association, and she is a fellow of the American Psychological Association. Her current research interests are in applying cognitive modeling techniques to measure the complexity and constraints in ado- lescents' views of the political and economic world. She re- ceived an A.B. degree in psychology from Stanford University and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in human development from the University of Chicago. DAVID E. WILEY is professor and dean at the School of Edu- cation and Social Policy, Northwestern University. A statisti- cian and psychometrician by training and early work, much of his recent research and writing has focused on public policy as related to educational testing, teaching-learning processes, and legislative initiatives affecting these aspects of education. He has been involved in international comparative studies of edu- cation since 1971 and recently completed (with T. N. Postlethwaite) a volume reporting findings of the second science study of the International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (lEA). He also serves on the lEA International Technical Committee. His current research is focused on inte- grating frameworks for the assessment of learning, ability, and performance. He received a A.B. degree from San Diego State College, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Wisconsin. RICHARD M. WOLF is professor of psychology and education and chair of the Department of Measurement, Evaluation, and Statistics at Teachers College, Columbia University. His cur- rent work is In the areas of international research and educational evaluation. He is currently an individual member of the Inter- national Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement and serves as chair of its editorial committee ant} member of its technical advisory committee and steering committee for the computers in education project. He received a B.A. degree from Antioch College, an Ecl. M. degree from the University of Buffalo, and a Ph.D. degree from the University of Chicago.