practices. Some of the activities have had concrete consequences, such as changes to the Vaccine Injury Table; others have contributed to a groundswell leading to important changes, such as the need for vaccine compensation reform or better understanding of why the United States has failed to immunize its children. The potential for further developments and progress is enormous, as would be the resulting benefits.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

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