BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES of Committee Members

Charles P. Bean, Ph.D. (chairman), is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, American Academy of Arts and Science, American Physical Society, Biophysics Society and an institute professor in the School of Science at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Dr. Bean has been an associate editor of the Biophysics Journal and has been a recipient of the Industrial Research Magazine Research Award. He has an active interest in a broad range of studies in biophysics and has published on the motion of magnetotactic bacteria in a rotating magnetic field. His current research interests include solid-state physics, membrane biophysics, neurologic microstimulation, motion of DNA and proteins through gels, magnetism, and superconductivity.

Maurice S. Fox, Ph.D., is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the Institute of Medicine, and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. His academic training was in chemistry and he is currently the Lester Wolfe Professor of Molecular Biology at MIT. He has made major contributions to our understanding of genetic recombination and to the analysis of cancer incidence and effectiveness of treatment. Dr. Fox’s research interests include the description of molecular events responsible for the formation of genetic recombinants, identification of functions responsible for the repair of base pair mismatches in DNA, DNA repair, mutation avoidance, models to describe age dependence of cancer, and the evaluation of the effectiveness of medical procedures.

Fred M. Dietrich, MSEE, received his academic training at Carnegie Mellon University. Mr. Dietrich has had extensive experience in the analysis and measurement of power frequency fields, electromagnetic interference, audible noise and other corona phenomena from electric power systems, as well as experience in the development of transient measurement systems, and the design of special instruments for power system measurements. Mr. Dietrich has been active in the review and analysis of exposure systems and exposure conditions used by biomedical researchers to study possible health effects of exposure to power frequency electric and magnetic fields. His work has concentrated on the



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EMF Research Activities Completed Under the Energy Policy Act of 1992: [Interim Report, 1995] BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES of Committee Members Charles P. Bean, Ph.D. (chairman), is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, American Academy of Arts and Science, American Physical Society, Biophysics Society and an institute professor in the School of Science at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Dr. Bean has been an associate editor of the Biophysics Journal and has been a recipient of the Industrial Research Magazine Research Award. He has an active interest in a broad range of studies in biophysics and has published on the motion of magnetotactic bacteria in a rotating magnetic field. His current research interests include solid-state physics, membrane biophysics, neurologic microstimulation, motion of DNA and proteins through gels, magnetism, and superconductivity. Maurice S. Fox, Ph.D., is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the Institute of Medicine, and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. His academic training was in chemistry and he is currently the Lester Wolfe Professor of Molecular Biology at MIT. He has made major contributions to our understanding of genetic recombination and to the analysis of cancer incidence and effectiveness of treatment. Dr. Fox’s research interests include the description of molecular events responsible for the formation of genetic recombinants, identification of functions responsible for the repair of base pair mismatches in DNA, DNA repair, mutation avoidance, models to describe age dependence of cancer, and the evaluation of the effectiveness of medical procedures. Fred M. Dietrich, MSEE, received his academic training at Carnegie Mellon University. Mr. Dietrich has had extensive experience in the analysis and measurement of power frequency fields, electromagnetic interference, audible noise and other corona phenomena from electric power systems, as well as experience in the development of transient measurement systems, and the design of special instruments for power system measurements. Mr. Dietrich has been active in the review and analysis of exposure systems and exposure conditions used by biomedical researchers to study possible health effects of exposure to power frequency electric and magnetic fields. His work has concentrated on the

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EMF Research Activities Completed Under the Energy Policy Act of 1992: [Interim Report, 1995] measurement of fields and has not been directed to their possible health consequences. He is a registered professional engineer in the state of Pennsylvania and a senior member of the IEEE Power Engineering Society. Walter R. Rogers, Ph.D., has been active in various aspects of the study of in vivo effects of exposure to electromagnetic fields. He has examined the effects of 60 Hz electric and magnetic fields on the behavior of nonhuman primates and has described the effects of EMF on melatonin and the immune system in primates. His studies have assessed the ability of 60 Hz magnetic fields to serve as a promoter of melanoma induced in opossums by ultraviolet light. Trained in physiological psychology, he is a diplomate of the American Board of Toxicology. He has diverse experience in toxicology, having studied the effects of cigarette smoking in nonhuman primates and conducted neurobehavioral assessments of the effects of exposure to combustion products and other chemicals in primates and rodents. He also is involved in preclinical testing of new pharmaceutical agents. He has served at Southwest Research Institute, in San Antonio, for 21 years, where he is manager of biosciences in the Department of Biosciences and Bioengineering. Jan J. A. Stolwijk, Ph.D., is chairman of Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine. He has published extensively on epidemiologic and risk assessment studies on a number of topics including indoor air pollution, proximity to hazardous waste sites, smoking and indoor radon exposure, and effects of exposure to EMF. His specialties include regulatory systems in physiology, thermal receptor structures, and the construction and application of mathematical models for the study of complex physiological systems. He has been active in the study of the effects of heat on animal response and has worked with international groups in this area. Dr. Stolwijk is also a member of the NRC Committee on the Possible Effects of Electromagnetic Fields on Biologic Systems (EMF) and brings to this committee his experience in the extensive literature review conducted for that study, as well as experience gained from participation on other national and international bodies that have been involved in the study of the potential health effects of electromagnetic fields.

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EMF Research Activities Completed Under the Energy Policy Act of 1992: [Interim Report, 1995] Jerry R. Williams, Sc.D., has a distinguished career in the study of DNA damage and repair since earning his Sc.D. in Physiology and Radiobiology from Harvard University. He is presently professor of oncology and director of the Radiobiology Laboratory at the Johns Hopkins University Oncology Center, where his research work has focused on the role of DNA damage and repair in processes of cell inactivation, transformation, and aging. Dr. Williams has recently entered the EMF research field undertaking a study of effects on expression of myc oncogenes, growth enzymes (ODC), and carcinogenic and cocarcinogenesis processes. He is also a member of the NRC Committee on the Possible Effects of Electromagnetic Fields on Biologic Systems (EMF) and brings to this committee his experience in the extensive literature review conducted for that study.

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