Appendix B

Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members

Randolph H. Ware is the founder and facility director of the University Navstar Consortium (UNAVCO), a consortium of 55 U.S. and foreign universities that provide information and scientific infrastructure to investigators who use GPS for Earth science and related research. He is also one of several scientists responsible for the development of the GPS/MET program, a proof of concept program that has successfully demonstrated active limb sounding of the atmosphere by an orbiting GPS receiver. Dr. Ware is the author of many publications related to the use of GPS for both Earth and atmospheric science applications and holds several patents. He received his Ph.D. in experimental nuclear physics from the University of Colorado.

E. Ann Berman is the founder and president of Tri-Space, Inc., a consulting engineering firm that provides management consulting, systems analysis, training, and technical support for environmental systems. From 1984 to 1988, she was the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Research and Technology, and then for C3I and Space. Dr. Berman received her Ph.D. in meteorology from the University of Wisconsin, where she played an active role in the Global Atmospheric Research Program. She continues to teach courses in satellite meteorology at the university level. Her expertise includes: remote sensing; hydrogeologic modeling; geographic information systems development (GIS); and the development of software for environmental management.

Thomas Herring is an associate professor of geophysics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), where he has taught and conducted research since 1989. Prior to joining the MIT faculty, he was a research associate at Harvard University and a visiting scientist with the Australian Department of Energy and Resources. Dr. Herring received bachelor 's and master's degrees in surveying from the University of Queensland (Australia) and a Ph.D. from MIT. He is an expert in the use of GPS for geophysical research and has published papers related to the use of GPS for atmospheric research. Dr. Herring is the current chair of the National Research Council Committee on Geodesy under the Board on Earth Sciences and Resources, Commission on Geosciences, Environment, and Resources.

Ruth E. Neilan is currently director of the Central Bureau of the International GPS Service for Geodynamics (IGS), located at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California. She also serves as JPL 's GPS operations manager and has been a member of the JPL staff since 1984. Ms. Neilan has experience in GPS data processing, analysis, and software development, and engineering support for researchers using GPS for Earth, space, and atmospheric sciences. She has co-authored more than two dozen publications related to the scientific uses of differential GPS. Ms. Neilan received her B.S. and M.S. degrees in civil and environmental engineering from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Benjamin W. Remondi currently operates a GPS company known as The XYZ's of GPS, Inc., which he began after retiring from the National Geodetic Survey (NGS) of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association (NOAA) in 1994. During his 12-year career in NOAA-NGS, he held both technical and policy positions related to GPS and introduced the concepts of kinematic survey, pseudo-kinematic survey, and antenna swap to the GPS survey community. Dr. Remondi has also worked for NOAA's National Environmental Satellite Service and for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Dr. Remondi received his Ph.D. in aerospace engineering from the University of Texas at Austin.

Robert J. Serafin (NAE) is the current director of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), which is funded by several U.S. government agencies and private sources to conduct meteorological and atmospheric research. During his 22-year career at NCAR, Dr. Serafin has also been the director of the Atmospheric Technology Division and the facility manager. He has served on numerous advisory committees and national panels, including National Research Council committees and panels. Dr. Serafin received his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the Illinois Institute of Technology. His broad expertise in atmospheric research includes radar meteorology, instrumentation, remote sensing, and weather forecasting.



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The Global Positioning System for the Geosciences: Summary and Proceedings of a Workshop on Improving the GPS Reference Station Infrastructure for Earth, Oceanic, and Atmospheric Science Applications Appendix B Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members Randolph H. Ware is the founder and facility director of the University Navstar Consortium (UNAVCO), a consortium of 55 U.S. and foreign universities that provide information and scientific infrastructure to investigators who use GPS for Earth science and related research. He is also one of several scientists responsible for the development of the GPS/MET program, a proof of concept program that has successfully demonstrated active limb sounding of the atmosphere by an orbiting GPS receiver. Dr. Ware is the author of many publications related to the use of GPS for both Earth and atmospheric science applications and holds several patents. He received his Ph.D. in experimental nuclear physics from the University of Colorado. E. Ann Berman is the founder and president of Tri-Space, Inc., a consulting engineering firm that provides management consulting, systems analysis, training, and technical support for environmental systems. From 1984 to 1988, she was the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Research and Technology, and then for C3I and Space. Dr. Berman received her Ph.D. in meteorology from the University of Wisconsin, where she played an active role in the Global Atmospheric Research Program. She continues to teach courses in satellite meteorology at the university level. Her expertise includes: remote sensing; hydrogeologic modeling; geographic information systems development (GIS); and the development of software for environmental management. Thomas Herring is an associate professor of geophysics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), where he has taught and conducted research since 1989. Prior to joining the MIT faculty, he was a research associate at Harvard University and a visiting scientist with the Australian Department of Energy and Resources. Dr. Herring received bachelor 's and master's degrees in surveying from the University of Queensland (Australia) and a Ph.D. from MIT. He is an expert in the use of GPS for geophysical research and has published papers related to the use of GPS for atmospheric research. Dr. Herring is the current chair of the National Research Council Committee on Geodesy under the Board on Earth Sciences and Resources, Commission on Geosciences, Environment, and Resources. Ruth E. Neilan is currently director of the Central Bureau of the International GPS Service for Geodynamics (IGS), located at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California. She also serves as JPL 's GPS operations manager and has been a member of the JPL staff since 1984. Ms. Neilan has experience in GPS data processing, analysis, and software development, and engineering support for researchers using GPS for Earth, space, and atmospheric sciences. She has co-authored more than two dozen publications related to the scientific uses of differential GPS. Ms. Neilan received her B.S. and M.S. degrees in civil and environmental engineering from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Benjamin W. Remondi currently operates a GPS company known as The XYZ's of GPS, Inc., which he began after retiring from the National Geodetic Survey (NGS) of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association (NOAA) in 1994. During his 12-year career in NOAA-NGS, he held both technical and policy positions related to GPS and introduced the concepts of kinematic survey, pseudo-kinematic survey, and antenna swap to the GPS survey community. Dr. Remondi has also worked for NOAA's National Environmental Satellite Service and for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Dr. Remondi received his Ph.D. in aerospace engineering from the University of Texas at Austin. Robert J. Serafin (NAE) is the current director of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), which is funded by several U.S. government agencies and private sources to conduct meteorological and atmospheric research. During his 22-year career at NCAR, Dr. Serafin has also been the director of the Atmospheric Technology Division and the facility manager. He has served on numerous advisory committees and national panels, including National Research Council committees and panels. Dr. Serafin received his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the Illinois Institute of Technology. His broad expertise in atmospheric research includes radar meteorology, instrumentation, remote sensing, and weather forecasting.

OCR for page 229
The Global Positioning System for the Geosciences: Summary and Proceedings of a Workshop on Improving the GPS Reference Station Infrastructure for Earth, Oceanic, and Atmospheric Science Applications W. Kenneth Stewart is an ocean engineer and associate scientist in the Department of Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He has been a Woods Hole staff member since 1982 and has experience in acoustic and optical modeling; underwater remote sensing, mapping, and surveying; underwater robotics; and autonomous vehicles and smart remotely operated vehicles (ROVs). Dr. Stewart has also worked as a systems analyst for several computer software companies and was a visiting assistant professor in the electrical engineering department of the University of Virginia. He received his Ph.D. in oceanographic engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology/Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution