Appendix: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

ELLIOT ARONSON is professor of psychology at the University of california, Santa Cruz. He previously taught at Harvard, the University of Minnesota, and the University of Texas. His recent work is in applying the techniques of experimental social psychology to specific social problems, such as ethnic prejudice and energy conservation. He has won distinguished research awards from the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Psychological Association, and his experiments in desegregated classrooms recently won the Gordon Allport prize for intergroup relations. Of the many books he has written or edited, The Social Animal received the National Media Award in 1972. He has a Ph.D. degree in social psychology from Stanford.


ROBERT AXELROD is professor in the Department of Political Science and the Institute of Public Policy Studies of the University of Michigan. His research interests include mathematical models of decision making and national security policy. He and biologist William Hamilton received the Newcomb Cleveland Prize of the American Association for the Advancement of Science for their article, “The Evolution of Cooperation.” He received a B.A. degree from the University of Chicago and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Yale University.


ELLIS COSE was a National Research Council fellow who worked with the Committee on Behavioral and Social Aspects of Energy Consumption and Production. He is currently president of the Institute for Journalism Education at the University of California, Berkeley. Formerly, he was chief



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APPENDIX: BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF COMMITTEE MEMBERS AND STAFF 221 About this PDF file: This new digital representation of the original work has been recomposed from XML files created from the original paper book, not from the original typesetting files. Page breaks are true to the original; line lengths, word breaks, heading styles, and other typesetting-specific formatting, however, cannot be retained, Appendix: Biographical Sketches of and some typographic errors may have been accidentally inserted. Please use the print version of this publication as the authoritative version for attribution. Committee Members and Staff ELLIOT ARONSON is professor of psychology at the University of california, Santa Cruz. He previously taught at Harvard, the University of Minnesota, and the University of Texas. His recent work is in applying the techniques of experimental social psychology to specific social problems, such as ethnic prejudice and energy conservation. He has won distinguished research awards from the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Psychological Association, and his experiments in desegregated classrooms recently won the Gordon Allport prize for intergroup relations. Of the many books he has written or edited, The Social Animal received the National Media Award in 1972. He has a Ph.D. degree in social psychology from Stanford. ROBERT AXELROD is professor in the Department of Political Science and the Institute of Public Policy Studies of the University of Michigan. His research interests include mathematical models of decision making and national security policy. He and biologist William Hamilton received the Newcomb Cleveland Prize of the American Association for the Advancement of Science for their article, “The Evolution of Cooperation.” He received a B.A. degree from the University of Chicago and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Yale University. ELLIS COSE was a National Research Council fellow who worked with the Committee on Behavioral and Social Aspects of Energy Consumption and Production. He is currently president of the Institute for Journalism Education at the University of California, Berkeley. Formerly, he was chief

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APPENDIX: BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF COMMITTEE MEMBERS AND STAFF 222 About this PDF file: This new digital representation of the original work has been recomposed from XML files created from the original paper book, not from the original typesetting files. Page breaks are true to the original; line lengths, word breaks, heading styles, and other typesetting-specific formatting, however, cannot be retained, writer on the workplace and management for USA Today, an editorial columnist for the Chicago Sun-Times, a member of the editorial board of the Detroit Free and some typographic errors may have been accidentally inserted. Please use the print version of this publication as the authoritative version for attribution. Press, and a senior fellow and director of the Energy Policy Project at the Joint Center for Political Studies. He has been awarded several fellowships and has won several awards in journalism. He has an M.A. degree in science, technology, and public policy from George Washington University. JOHN McCONNON BARLEY is professor and chairman of the Department of Psychology at Princeton University. He previously taught at New York University. His earlier work included research on people’s reactions to emergencies, particularly reactions that determine whether people will give help to victims. Currently he studies perceptions of energy and energy problems and the ways in which information can be made available to people to facilitate their energy-conserving behaviors. He received a B.A. degree from Swarthmore College and a Ph.D. degree from Harvard University. RICHARD HOFRICHTER worked as research associate for the committee on Behavioral and Social Aspects of Energy Consumption and Production. A legal sociologist, he was previously research associate for the Criminal Justice and the Elderly Program of the National Council of Senior Citizens. He has written articles on neighborhood justice, legal services delivery, restitution, and victim compensation. His interests include democratic social planning, alternatives to courts, and class struggle in American cities. He received a Ph.D. degree in political science from the City University of New York. SARA KIESLER is professor of social science and social psychology at Carnegie-Mellon University. She has been on the faculties of Yale University, Connecticut College, and the University of Kansas and served as a study director at the National Research Council from 1975 to 1979. Her current research interests include behavioral and social aspects of computing, telecommunications, technological change in organizations, group decision making, and public policy in the areas of technology, aging, and energy. She is an editor for Social Issues and a member of the Panel on Consensus Development of the National Institutes of Health, the executive council of the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues, and the council of the American Psychological Association. She received a B.S. degree from Simmons College, an M.A. degree from Stanford University, and a Ph.D. degree in psychology from Ohio State University. DOROTHY LEONARD-BARTON is assistant professor of management at the Sloan School of Management of the Massachusetts Institute of

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APPENDIX: BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF COMMITTEE MEMBERS AND STAFF 225 About this PDF file: This new digital representation of the original work has been recomposed from XML files created from the original paper book, not from the original typesetting files. Page breaks are true to the original; line lengths, word breaks, heading styles, and other typesetting-specific formatting, however, cannot be retained, uation Review. He has a B.S. degree in chemistry from McGill University and a Ph.D. degree in sociology from the University of Michigan. and some typographic errors may have been accidentally inserted. Please use the print version of this publication as the authoritative version for attribution. ROBERT H.SOCOLOW is professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering and director of the Center for Energy and Environmental Studies at Princeton University. The goals of his current research are to clarify issues of science and values related to the global energy and environmental crisis. His specific interests include residential energy conservation strategies, technologies for economic development, and the role of analysis in decisions about natural resources. Since 1972, he has directed a team of scientists, engineers, architects, statisticians, and psychologists in a research program on energy conservation in the built environment. He received B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. degrees in physics from Harvard University. PAUL C.STERN is study director for the Committee on Behavioral and Social Aspects of Energy Consumption and Production. He heads the energy committee of the Division of Population and Environmental Psychology of the American Psychological Association. Previously he was research associate in the Program on Energy and Behavior at Yale University’s Institution for Social and Policy Studies. His research on energy and environmental policy issues has resulted in numerous articles and a book. He has a B.A. degree from Amherst College and a Ph.D. degree in psychology from Clark University. THOMAS J.WILBANKS is associate director of the Energy Division at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. He formerly served on the faculty at Syracuse University and as chair of the geography department at the University of Oklahoma, where he also participated in the Science and Public Policy Program. His principal interests are in energy policy, institutional roles and structures in science and technology, and relationships between society and technology. He has been a national officer of the Association of American Geographers and a member of a number of panels concerned with national energy research policy. He has a Ph.D. degree in geography from Syracuse University. SIDNEY G.WINTER is professor of economics and of organization and management at Yale University. He was previously a professor at the University of Michigan, and has also taught at the University of California, Berkeley, and other universities. His research interests include behavior of the firm and industrial organization, with particular emphasis on technological change and the evolution of industrial structure. He received a B.A. degree from Swarthmore College and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Yale University, all in economics.

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