References

American Academy of Pediatrics. Report of the Committee on Infectious Diseases, 23rd Edition. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics; 1994.

Carbone M, Pass HI, Rizzo P, Marinetti M, DiMuzio M, Mew DJ, Levine AS, Procopio A. Simian virus 40–like DNA sequences in human pleural mesothelioma. Oncogene 1994; 9:1781–1790.

Hinman AR, Koplan JP, Orenstein WA, Brink EW, Nkowane BM. Live or inactivated poliomyelitis vaccine: an analysis of benefits and risks. American Journal of Public Health 1988; 78:291–295.

Institute of Medicine. An Evaluation of Poliomyelitis Vaccine Policy Options. Washington, DC: National Academy of Sciences; 1988.

Institute of Medicine. Howson CP, Howe CJ, Fineberg HV, eds. Adverse Effects of Pertussis and Rubella Vaccines. Washington, DC: National Academy Press; 1991.

Institute of Medicine. Stratton KR, Howe CJ, Johnston RB, eds. Adverse Events Associated with Childhood Vaccines: Evidence Bearing on Causality. Washington, DC: National Academy Press; 1994a.

Institute of Medicine. Stratton KR, Howe CJ, Johnston RB, eds. DPT Vaccine and Chronic Nervous System Dysfunction: A New Analysis. Washington, DC: National Academy Press; 1994b.

Institute of Medicine. Stratton KR, Howe CJ, Johnston RB, eds. Research Strategies for Assessing Adverse Events Associated with Vaccines: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: National Academy Press; 1994c.



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OCR for page 33
Options for Poliomyelitis Vaccination in the United States: Workshop Summary References American Academy of Pediatrics. Report of the Committee on Infectious Diseases, 23rd Edition. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics; 1994. Carbone M, Pass HI, Rizzo P, Marinetti M, DiMuzio M, Mew DJ, Levine AS, Procopio A. Simian virus 40–like DNA sequences in human pleural mesothelioma. Oncogene 1994; 9:1781–1790. Hinman AR, Koplan JP, Orenstein WA, Brink EW, Nkowane BM. Live or inactivated poliomyelitis vaccine: an analysis of benefits and risks. American Journal of Public Health 1988; 78:291–295. Institute of Medicine. An Evaluation of Poliomyelitis Vaccine Policy Options. Washington, DC: National Academy of Sciences; 1988. Institute of Medicine. Howson CP, Howe CJ, Fineberg HV, eds. Adverse Effects of Pertussis and Rubella Vaccines. Washington, DC: National Academy Press; 1991. Institute of Medicine. Stratton KR, Howe CJ, Johnston RB, eds. Adverse Events Associated with Childhood Vaccines: Evidence Bearing on Causality. Washington, DC: National Academy Press; 1994a. Institute of Medicine. Stratton KR, Howe CJ, Johnston RB, eds. DPT Vaccine and Chronic Nervous System Dysfunction: A New Analysis. Washington, DC: National Academy Press; 1994b. Institute of Medicine. Stratton KR, Howe CJ, Johnston RB, eds. Research Strategies for Assessing Adverse Events Associated with Vaccines: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: National Academy Press; 1994c.

OCR for page 33
Options for Poliomyelitis Vaccination in the United States: Workshop Summary Martin WJ, Ahmed KN, Zeng LC, Olsen JC, Seward JG, Seehrai JS. African green monkey origin of the atypical cytopathic “stealth virus” isolated from a patient with chronic fatigue syndrome. Clinical and Diagnostic Virology 1995; 4:93–103. McBean AM, Thomas ML, Albrecht P et al. Serologic response to oral polio vaccine and enhanced-potency inactivated polio vaccines. American Journal of Epidemiology 1988; 128:615. Nkowane BM, Wassilak SGF, Orenstein WA et al. Vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis. United States: 1973 through 1984. Journal of the American Medical Association 1987; 257:1335–1340. Onorato IM, Modlin JF, McBean AM, Thoms ML, Losonsky GA, Bernier RH. Mucosal immunity induced by enhanced potency inactivated and oral polio vaccines. Journal of Infectious Diseases 1991; 163:1–6. Plotkin SA, Mortimer EA, eds. Vaccines, 2nd edition. New York: W.B. Saunders Company; 1994. (See especially chapters 1, 6, 7, and 8) Strebel PM, Sutter RW, Cochi SL, Biellik RJ, Brink EW, Kew OM, Pallansch MA, Orenstein WA, Hinman AR. Epidemiology of poliomyelitis in the United States one decade after the last reported case of indigenous wild virus-associated disease. Clinical Infectious Diseases 1992; 14:568–579. Sutter R and Patriarca P. Inactivated and live, attenuated poliovirus vaccines: mucosal immunity. In: Kurstak E, ed. Measles and Poliomyelitis. Springer-Verlag; 1993.