Appendix 2

Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

RICHARD FISHER, chair, serves as professor of forest soils, head of the Forest Science Department, and director of the Institute for Renewable Natural Resources at Texas A&M University. His research interests are in soil–plant interactions in both temperate and tropical systems and the use of experimentally derived knowledge for managing forest productivity. He is a fellow of the Soil Science Society of America and the Society of American Foresters and is president-elect of the National Association of Professional Forestry Schools and Colleges. He served on the National Research Council Committee on Forestry Research and is currently Co-Editor-in-Chief of Forest Ecology and Management. Dr. Fisher received his B.S. from the University of Illinois in 1964 and his Ph.D. from Cornell University in 1968.

PATRICK L. BREZONIK received a B.S. in 1963 from Marquette University, an M.S. in 1965 from the University of Wisconsin, and a Ph.D. in water chemistry in 1968 from the University of Wisconsin. Dr. Brezonik is professor of Environmental Engineering and Director of Water Resources Research Center at the University of Minnesota. He was chairman of National Research Council Panel on Nitrates in the Environment in 1975–1978; and a member of the National Research Council Committee on Restoration of Aquatic Ecosystems. He is currently a member of the National Research Council's Water Science and Technology Board. Dr. Brezonik's research interests are eutrophication of lakes, nitrogen dynamics in natural waters, nutrient chemistry, acid rain, trace metals in natural waters, and organic matter in water.



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Review of EPA's Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program: Surface Waters Monitoring Component Appendix 2 Biographical Sketches of Committee Members RICHARD FISHER, chair, serves as professor of forest soils, head of the Forest Science Department, and director of the Institute for Renewable Natural Resources at Texas A&M University. His research interests are in soil–plant interactions in both temperate and tropical systems and the use of experimentally derived knowledge for managing forest productivity. He is a fellow of the Soil Science Society of America and the Society of American Foresters and is president-elect of the National Association of Professional Forestry Schools and Colleges. He served on the National Research Council Committee on Forestry Research and is currently Co-Editor-in-Chief of Forest Ecology and Management. Dr. Fisher received his B.S. from the University of Illinois in 1964 and his Ph.D. from Cornell University in 1968. PATRICK L. BREZONIK received a B.S. in 1963 from Marquette University, an M.S. in 1965 from the University of Wisconsin, and a Ph.D. in water chemistry in 1968 from the University of Wisconsin. Dr. Brezonik is professor of Environmental Engineering and Director of Water Resources Research Center at the University of Minnesota. He was chairman of National Research Council Panel on Nitrates in the Environment in 1975–1978; and a member of the National Research Council Committee on Restoration of Aquatic Ecosystems. He is currently a member of the National Research Council's Water Science and Technology Board. Dr. Brezonik's research interests are eutrophication of lakes, nitrogen dynamics in natural waters, nutrient chemistry, acid rain, trace metals in natural waters, and organic matter in water.

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Review of EPA's Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program: Surface Waters Monitoring Component INGRID C. BURKE is a Research Associate, Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory, Colorado State University. She is currently involved in interdisciplinary research programs investigating the control of plant productivity, soil organic matter turnover, and trace gas flux in the Great Plains. Dr. Burke was a member of the EPA's EMAP Landscape Characterization Panel and NSF's Conservation and Restoration Biology Panel, 1990. She has a B.A. in biology from Middlebury College and a Ph.D. in botany from the University of Wyoming. She is a member of the Association of Women in Science, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, American Institute of Biological Sciences, the Ecological Society of America, and the Soil Science Society of America. LOVEDAY L. CONQUEST received her B.A. in mathematics in 1970 from Pomona College, her M.S. in statistics from Stanford University in 1972, and her Ph.D. in biostatistics from University of Washington in 1975. Dr. Conquest is a biostatistician working in the areas of environmental monitoring (experimental design, sampling design, data analysis/interpretation), natural resource management (e.g., fisheries, forestry, ecology), and related areas. She is associate dean of the College of Ocean and Fishery Sciences and associate professor in the School of Fisheries ' Center for Quantitative Science (CQs) in Forestry, Fisheries, and Wildlife at the University of Washington, and heads the Statistical Consulting Laboratory for CQS. She has provided consulting services to other researchers, environmental consulting firms, and public agencies. Dr. Conquest is a Fellow of the American Statisistical Association. THURMAN L. GROVE received a B.A. in 1966 from Wilkes College and a Ph.D. from Cornell University in ecology and soil science in 1982. He is currently Professor of Soil Science, Assistant Dean of the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, and Director of International Programs at North Carolina State University. His research interests are biogeochemistry, agroecology, and international development. JOHN E. HOBBIE received a BA in 1957 in ecology from Dartmouth College, an M.A. in 1959 from the University of

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Review of EPA's Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program: Surface Waters Monitoring Component California, and a Ph.D. in zoology in 1962 from Indiana University. He was Assistant Professor to Professor of zoology at North Carolina State University from 1965–1975. Dr. Hobbie is currently Senior Scientist and Director, Ecosystems Center at the Marine Biology Laboratory, Woods Hole, Massachusetts. Dr. Hobbie's research interests are arctic and antarctic limnology, heterotrophic bacteria in aquatic ecosystems, estuarine ecology, and the global carbon cycle. TIM KRATZ received a B.S. in 1975 (botany) from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, an M.S. (ecology and behavioral biology) from the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities in 1977, and a Ph.D. (botany) from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1981. From 1981–1985 he was Project Associate and Site Manager, Northern Lakes Long Term Ecological Research Project. He is currently Assistant Scientist and Site Manager for that project. His research interests include limnology, landscape/lake interactions, wetland formation, and landscape ecology. ANNE E. MCELROY received a B.S. in aquatic biology from Brown University in 1976 and a Ph.D. in oceanography from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology/Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Joint Program in 1985. From 1986– 1991 she was an assistant professor in the Environmental Sciences Program at the University of Massachusetts-Boston. Dr. McElroy currently serves as the director of the New York Sea Grant Institute and holds an appointment as an associate professor at the Marine Sciences Research Center at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. Her research interests concern how aquatic organisms interact with toxic chemicals in the environment. JOHN PASTOR received his B.S. in geology in 1974 from the University of Pennsylvania, an M.S. in soil science in 1977 from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and a Ph.D. in forestry and soil science in 1980 from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Dr. Pastor is currently Research Associate, Natural Resources Research Institute at the University of Minnesota; Adjunct Professor, Department of Ecology and Behavioral Biology, University

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Review of EPA's Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program: Surface Waters Monitoring Component of Minnesota; and Adjunct Professor, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, also at the University of Minnesota. His research interests are northern ecosystems, nutrient cycling, climate change, forest productivity, timber management, and landscape ecology. JAMES N. PITTS received a B.S. in 1945 from the University of California, Los Angeles, and a Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of California, Los Angeles in 1949. He has been a member of National Research Council Advisory Board on Military Personnel Supplies for the Committee on Textile Functional Finishing, and Chairman of the Panel of Polycyclic Organic Matter for the Committee on Kinetics of Chemical Reactions. Dr. Pitts is Professor Emeritus in the Department of Chemistry and past Director of the Statewide Air Pollution Research Center at the University of California, Riverside. He was also an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University, Fullerton, and Coordinating Instructor in Air Pollution in the Extension Division of the University of California, Irvine. Dr. Pitts is currently a research chemist at the University of California, Irvine, California. His research interests include fundamental processes in photochemistry and photooxidations and their application to the atmospheric chemistry of photochemical smog, acid rain, airborne toxics, and mutagenic and/or carcinogenic pollutants. SAUL B. SAILA received a B.S. from University of Rhode Island in 1949, an M.S. in fishery biology in 1950 from Cornell University, and a Ph.D. in fishery biology from Cornell in 1952. He was a fishery biologist at the Rhode Island Department of Agriculture and Conservation. He was professor of oceanography and chief scientist, Office of Marine Programs at University of Rhode Island 1975–1988. In 1988 he became Emeritus Professor and consultant. His research interests are in fish population dynamics and stock assessment. TERENCE R. SMITH received a Ph.D. in 1971 from Johns Hopkins University. He attended the Graduate School of Management, University of Rochester, New York: Doctoral Program in

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Review of EPA's Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program: Surface Waters Monitoring Component Applied Economics in 1975-1976. Dr. Smith is currently Chairman, Department of Computer Science, University of California, Santa Barbara, Professor of Computer Science, and Professor of Geography, University of California, Santa Barbara. He is also Associate Director, National Center for Geographical Information and Analysis, Co-Director, Remote Sensing Unit, Co-Director, Center for the Study of Spatial Cognition and Performance, and Associate Director, Community and Organization Research Institute. Dr. Smith's research interests are machine intelligence, spatial databases, spatial cognition, and motion planning. SUSAN STAFFORD is a forest biometrician at the Department of Forest Science, Oregon State University. Dr. Stafford consults with forest science researchers on the design of experiments in forest ecology; forest genetics; and on the collecting, handling, and analysis of data. She is also data manager for the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest and director and creator of the Forest Science Data Bank at Oregon State University. Dr. Stafford received her Ph.D. in applied statistics in 1979 from State University of New York, College of Environmental Science and Forestry. MICHAEL J. WILEY received a B.G.S. in 1973, an M.S. in 1976, and a Ph.D. in 1980 from the University of Michigan. He is Assistant Professor, School of Natural Resources, University of Michigan. Dr. Wiley's research interests are ecology of river systems, benthic invertebrates, and fisheries management. Prior experience includes Associate Professional Ecologist, Illinois Natural History Survey, 1984–1987. Dr. Wiley is a member of the Ecological Society of America, American Fisheries Society,