Biographical Data

YUMI AKIMOTO is the executive vice president of Mitsubishi Materials Corporation (MMC). He also serves as the executive vice president of Mitsubishi Nuclear Fuels Company. Akimoto received his D.Sc. (Ph.D. equivalent) degree from Tokyo Bunrika University in 1957. From 1958 to 1960, Akimoto was a visiting scholar and research chemist at the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory at the University of California, Berkeley. His research centered on microchemical work on actinide elements. After his work at Berkeley, Akimoto spent almost 20 years at the Central Research laboratory with MMC working on nuclear fuel cycles, electronic materials, and new metals. For the past 15 years, until his recent promotion to executive vice president, Akimoto has worked on establishing a nuclear fuel cycle business as senior managing director and general manager of Mitsubishi's Nuclear Energy Division. He has also served as a lecturer at the University of Tokyo. He is a fellow of the Atomic Society of Japan, and a member of the Engineering Academy of Japan and the American Nuclear Society. Currently he is serving as a member of the specialists' committee for the Japanese Government's Atomic Energy Commission.

BRADEN R. ALLENBY is the research vice president, technology and environment, for AT&T. He graduated cum laude from Yale University in 1972 and received his Juris Doctor from the University of Virginia Law School in 1978 and his master's degree in economics from the University of Virginia in 1979. He received his master's degree in environmental sciences from Rutgers University in the spring of 1989 and his Ph.D. in environmental sciences from Rutgers in 1992. Allenby is a member of the Aeronautics Board and the Federal Communications Commission, as well as a strategic consultant on economic and technical telecommunications issues. He joined AT&T in 1983 as a telecommunications regulatory attorney and was an environmental attorney and senior environmental attorney for AT&T from 1984 to 1993. During 1992 he was the J. Herbert Hollomon Fellow at the National Academy of Engineering in Washington, D.C. He currently chairs the American Electronics Association Design for Environment Task Force and is vice-chair of the IEEE Committee on the Environment. Allenby is coauthor of an engineering textbook on Design for Environment and industrial ecology to be published by Prentice-Hall in spring of 1994.

RICHARD A. DENISON is a senior scientist at the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) in Washington, D.C. His areas of work at EDF include materials use policy and solid and hazardous waste management. He has written many papers on municipal solid waste reduction, recycling, incineration, and landfilling, as well as a recent book entitled Recycling and Incineration: Evaluating the Choices. Denison's current areas of work include examination of life cycle assessment as a tool for product and process design; risks of incinerator ash management and utilization; and environmental labeling and “green ” marketing. He headed EDF's team on the recently completed joint waste reduction task force with McDonald's Corporation,



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Industrial Ecology: U.S.-Japan Perspectives Biographical Data YUMI AKIMOTO is the executive vice president of Mitsubishi Materials Corporation (MMC). He also serves as the executive vice president of Mitsubishi Nuclear Fuels Company. Akimoto received his D.Sc. (Ph.D. equivalent) degree from Tokyo Bunrika University in 1957. From 1958 to 1960, Akimoto was a visiting scholar and research chemist at the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory at the University of California, Berkeley. His research centered on microchemical work on actinide elements. After his work at Berkeley, Akimoto spent almost 20 years at the Central Research laboratory with MMC working on nuclear fuel cycles, electronic materials, and new metals. For the past 15 years, until his recent promotion to executive vice president, Akimoto has worked on establishing a nuclear fuel cycle business as senior managing director and general manager of Mitsubishi's Nuclear Energy Division. He has also served as a lecturer at the University of Tokyo. He is a fellow of the Atomic Society of Japan, and a member of the Engineering Academy of Japan and the American Nuclear Society. Currently he is serving as a member of the specialists' committee for the Japanese Government's Atomic Energy Commission. BRADEN R. ALLENBY is the research vice president, technology and environment, for AT&T. He graduated cum laude from Yale University in 1972 and received his Juris Doctor from the University of Virginia Law School in 1978 and his master's degree in economics from the University of Virginia in 1979. He received his master's degree in environmental sciences from Rutgers University in the spring of 1989 and his Ph.D. in environmental sciences from Rutgers in 1992. Allenby is a member of the Aeronautics Board and the Federal Communications Commission, as well as a strategic consultant on economic and technical telecommunications issues. He joined AT&T in 1983 as a telecommunications regulatory attorney and was an environmental attorney and senior environmental attorney for AT&T from 1984 to 1993. During 1992 he was the J. Herbert Hollomon Fellow at the National Academy of Engineering in Washington, D.C. He currently chairs the American Electronics Association Design for Environment Task Force and is vice-chair of the IEEE Committee on the Environment. Allenby is coauthor of an engineering textbook on Design for Environment and industrial ecology to be published by Prentice-Hall in spring of 1994. RICHARD A. DENISON is a senior scientist at the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) in Washington, D.C. His areas of work at EDF include materials use policy and solid and hazardous waste management. He has written many papers on municipal solid waste reduction, recycling, incineration, and landfilling, as well as a recent book entitled Recycling and Incineration: Evaluating the Choices. Denison's current areas of work include examination of life cycle assessment as a tool for product and process design; risks of incinerator ash management and utilization; and environmental labeling and “green ” marketing. He headed EDF's team on the recently completed joint waste reduction task force with McDonald's Corporation,

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Industrial Ecology: U.S.-Japan Perspectives a project which was awarded a 1991 Environment and Conservation Challenge Medal by the President of the United States. Denison has served on many boards, including the National Research Council's Committee on Waste Disposal Options, the Source Reduction Council of the Coalition of Northeast Governors, and the Steering Committee of the Conservation Foundation's Project on Strategies for Source Reduction. Denison holds a doctorate in biochemistry from Yale University. Before joining EDF in early 1987, he served as an analyst at the Congressional Office of Technology Assessment. GREGORY EYRING is a senior analyst in the Energy and Materials Program at the Office of Technology Assessment (OTA), a nonpartisan support agency of the United States Congress. He received a Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1981. He then did three years of postdoctoral research in chemical physics at Stanford University before joining the OTA staff as a fellow in 1984. Eyring was project director of the OTA studies Advanced Materials by Design (June 1988), HighTemperature Superconductivity in Perspective (May 1990), and Green Products by Design: Choices for a Cleaner Environment (October 1992). The latter study explores trends in designer's use of materials and means by which Congress can shape policies that encourage environmentally sound design. ROBERT A. FROSCH is a senior research fellow at the John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, and a senior fellow at the National Academy of Engineering. He recently retired from the position of vice-president in charge of General Motors research laboratories. Frosch's career combines varied research and administrative experience in industry and in government service. He has been involved in global environmental research and policy issues at both the national and the international level. From 1951 to 1963 he was employed at the Hudson Laboratories of Columbia University, first as a research scientist and then as director from 1956 to 1963. In 1963 he became director for nuclear test detection in the Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA) of the Department of Defense, and deputy director of ARPA in 1965. In 1966 he was appointed assistant secretary of the Navy for research and development. He served in this position until January 1973, when he became assistant executive director of the United Nations Environment Program. In 1975 he became associate director for applied oceanography at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, and from 1977 to 1981 he served as administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. He served as president of the American Association of Engineering Societies from 1981 to 1982. Frosch is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He received his A.B., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in theoretical physics from Columbia University. ANN B. FULLERTON is an environmental consultant specializing in media, government, and community relations. Expert in strategic communication planning, crisis communication, and media training, she has served on the board of directors and chaired the communications subcommittees of several major industry associations and collaboratives, including the Industry Collaboration for Ozone Layer Protection, the Center for Office Technology, and the American Electronics Association' s Design for Environment Committee. Before consulting, she served as public relations counsel to senior management at Digital Equipment Corporation, the IDEA Group of Companies, and Data Translation. Fullerton received her B.S. degree from Boston University and her M.S. from Simmons Graduate School of Management. SANDY S. LABANA is manager of the Polymer Science Department at the Ford Research Laboratory. He received his undergraduate degree from Punjab University in India and his Ph.D. in chemistry in 1963 from Cornell University, Ithaca. After a year of postdoctoral research at the University of California, Berkeley, he joined Xerox Corporation, where his work involved the development of photoconductive pigments for color photocopying processes. In 1967 he joined Ford Motor Company. His work includes the development of powder paints, waterbased paints, radiation curable coatings, study of crossinking reactions in polymers, and more recently, recycling of automotive materials. He has served as chairman of polymeric materials in the Science and Engineering Division of the American Chemical Society; chairman of the Detroit Section of the American Chemical Society; chairman of the Gordon Research Conferences on coatings; and chairman of the Vehicle Recycling Partnership. He is a councilor for the American Chemical Society. ALFRED W. LINDSEY is the director of the Office of Environmental Engineering and Technology Demonstration, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, where his responsibilities include the research, development, and evaluation of air, water, and hazardous and solid waste pollution control technology. A graduate of North Carolina State University, he received a B.S. in pulp and paper technology and has done graduate work in environmental engineering and in environmental management at Drexel University and George Washington University. From 1972 to 1979, he held various hazardous waste management positions in EPA. In 1979 he became deputy director of the Hazardous and Industrial Waste Division in the

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Industrial Ecology: U.S.-Japan Perspectives Office of Solid Waste at EPA and served in that role until 1985, when he became deputy director of the Office of Environmental Engineering and Technology Demonstration. He assumed the director's position in 1988. ISAMU MAKI is president of Canon Business Machines, Inc., Costa Mesa, California. He joined Canon in 1966 with an interest in electrophotography technology. Maki rose to the position of Carton's chief executive of chemical products operation before assuming his current position in 1992. Maki received his bachelor of science degree from Saitoma University. NAGAYUKI MARUMO is auditor for Nissan Motor Company, Ltd. Marumo received his degree from the University of Tokyo Faculty of Engineering in 1951 and joined Nissan Motor Company, Ltd. in 1959. In 1975 Marumo was named general manager of the Vehicle Research Department of Nissan 's Central Engineering Laboratory and in 1977 was assigned the additional post of general manager of the Research Administration for the Central Engineering Laboratory. In 1983 he became director and a member of the board of directors and in 1987 was appointed as the managing director in charge of research and development. Since then, Marumo has been in charge of the Product Planning and Marketing Group, the Product Design and Research Group, and the Quality Assurance Group. In 1991 he was named vice president in charge of these groups and in 1993 assumed his present position. TSUNEO MITSUI is a senior executive adviser of the Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO). Mitsui received his B.S. degree in electrical engineering from University of Tokyo. Soon after his graduation from the university, he joined the electric utility industry. At TEPCO he has been primarily involved in power system operation and management and R&D management. He is a member of the Engineering Academy of Japan and is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. He is currently president of the Japanese Institute of Electrical Engineers, chairman of the Japan Society of Energy and Resources, chairman of the Cryogenic Association of Japan, vice chairman of a Japanese committee of the International Conference of Large High-Tension Electric Systems. He is also a member of several special committees of Keidanren (Federation of Economic Organizations) and the Ministry of International Trade and Industry. DEANNA J. RICHARDS is senior program officer with the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) and directs the Academy's Technology and Environment program. Before joining the Academy in 1990, she was an assistant professor at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte and in 1989, as an environmental sciences and engineering fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Sciences, she worked on remedy selection criteria at Superfund sites. She has published several articles on her engineering work on advanced biological wastewater treatment systems. Richards, a registered engineer, has also done engineering consulting in Malaysia and the United States. She received her B.S. degree in civil engineering from the University of Edinburgh, and her M.S. and Ph.D. degrees, also in civil egineering, from the University of Pennsylvania. JULIAN SZEKELY is professor of materials engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), a post he has held since 1975. He holds B.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees in chemical engineering from Imperial College, London. After graduating he worked for Cremer and Warner a London-based consulting firm, then taught at Imperial College and at the State University of New York, Buffalo, before joining MIT. His main technical interests are in materials processing and in the mathematical modeling of materials processing operations, including steelmaking, aluminum technology, welding, crystal growth, and circuit board interconnection. Additional interests include the management of technology, international competitiveness, and industrial ecology. He has written more than 380 technical articles and numerous textbooks and edited several volumes in these general areas. His work has been recognized by many national and international awards; he is a Fellow of the Metallurgical Society, a member of the National Academy of Engineering, and an honorary member of the Hungarian Engineering Academy. SHUZABURO TAKEDA has been a professor of engineering at Tokai University since 1976. In 1992 and 1993 he was a special assistant to the Office of the President for the University of Tennessee System and a distinguished visiting professor of computer science at the Knoxville Campus. He was a visiting professor in the Elliott School for International Affairs at George Washington University in 1991 and for the Peace Studies Program at Cornell University in 1984, and was a visiting research fellow at the Institute of Production Technologies, Tokyo University, from 1980 to 1983. Before joining Tokai University, he was a lecturer at Keio University and a member of the doctoral faculty of the Chemistry Department at the University of North Carolina from 1969 to 1972. Takeda received his B.S. and M.S. degrees in applied engineering from Keio University and his Ph.D. in physics from Ohio State University. He has also received a masters degree in political science. His primary research work has been in opto-electronics (materials, solar energies, molecular devices, and optical computer) and theoretical studies in

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Industrial Ecology: U.S.-Japan Perspectives synergy and dissipation structures. Takeda has served many Japanese governmental committees for energy, population, environment, high technology, and U.S.-Japan relations. MICHIYUKI UENOHARA is executive adviser of NEC Corporation in Tokyo, Japan. He also serves as chairman of NEC Research Institute in Princeton, New Jersey, and chairman of the board of trustees at NEC Research Institute for Advanced Management Systems in Tokyo. Uenohara received his B.S. degree from Nihon University in Tokyo and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the Ohio State University, all in electric engineering. Before joining NEC, he had worked at Bell Laboratories for 10 years. At NEC he managed corporate R&D as general manager of the Central Research Laboratories both before and after he was elected to the board of directors. In 1989 he resigned as senior executive vice president and director and took his present position. He is a Japanese member of the High Level Advisory Panel based on the U.S.-Japan agreement on cooperation in science and technology, and serves for various government councils, including the Higher Education Council of the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture. He is fellow of Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, a member of Engineering Academy of Japan, a foreign associate of the National Academy of Engineering and the Swedish Royal Academy of Engineering Sciences. CHIHIRO WATANABE is deputy director-general for technology development at Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI). He is responsible for the New Sunshine Program (R&D programs on energy and environmental technologies) at the Agency of Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) of MITI. He also serves part-time at Tokyo University as a lecturer in the Engineering Department. Watanabe received his B.E. degree in urban planning and his Ph.D. degree in arts and sciences from Tokyo University. He has spent most of his career with MITI in policy planning, energy policy, and industrial technology policy. Watanabe was a professor and director of the International Program in the Graduate School of Policy Science at Saitama University from 1988 to 1990 KURT E. YEAGER is senior vice president for technical operations of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Palo Alto, California. In this position he is responsible for management and technical direction of EPRI's five technical divisions encompassing Customer Systems, Electrical Systems, Environment, Generation and Storage, and Nuclear Power. In addition, he has responsibility for the Office of Exploratory and Applied Research and the Integrated Energy Systems Division. Before joining EPRI in 1974, Yeager was the director of energy R &D planning for the Environmental Protection Agency Office of Research. Previously he was with the MITRE Corporation as associate head of the Environmental Systems Department. Yeager is a fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and has served on the Executive Board of the National Coal Council. He has also served on several National Academy of Engineering Committees and on the Energy Research Advisory Board to the Department of Energy. He has written more than 150 technical publications on energy and environmental topics. Yeager received a bachelor's degree from Kenyon College and completed graduate studies in chemistry and physics at Ohio State University and the University of California, Davis. NOBORU YUMOTO is the executive director of technology for the Japan External Trade Organization. Yumoto graduated from Tokyo University in 1974 with a major in industrial engineering and urban engineering. After graduation, Yumoto joined the Ministry of International Trade and Industry. He worked in various divisions, including the Industrial Location and Environmental Protection Bureau, the Machinery and Information Industries Bureau, the National Land Agency, the Agency of Natural Resources and Energy and the General Minister's Secretariat. In 1988 Yumoto became the director of the Strategic Commodities Export Inspection Office of the International Trade Administration Bureau and in 1990 moved to the Industrial Location and Environmental Protection Bureau as director of the Environmental Protection Guidance Office.