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APPENDIX D BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF PARTICIPANTS JUDTTlI TANUR (Chair) is associate processor of sociology at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. She received a B. S. in psychology from Columbia University in 1957, an M.A. in mathematical statistics from Columbia in ~ 963, and a Ph. D. in sociology from the State University of New York, Stony Brook, in 1972. She is editor of Statistics: A Guide to the Unknown and co-editor of ~ ~ SO as. Her research has centered on interpersonal control processes, the applications of statistics to social science data, and parallels between the methodology of survey research and that of social experiments. She is a member of the Committee on National Statistics. NORMAN BRADBURN is the Tiffany and Margaret Blake Distinguished Service Professor at the University of Chicago. He is a member of the Department of Behavioral Sciences, a member of the faculties of the Graduate School of Business and the College, and director of the National Opinion Research Center. He received a B.A. in 1952 from the University of Chicago, a B.A. from Magdalen College, Oxford University, in 1955, and a Ph.~. from Harvard University in 1960. His research interests include the study of psychological well-~eing and assessments of the quality of life, particularly through the use of large-scale sample surveys; nonsampling errors in sample surveys; and social indicators. He i s a member of the Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education of the National Research Counci 1. PHILIP E. CONVERSE is professor of political science and sociology at the University of Michigan and director of the Center for Political Studies at the Institute for Social Research. H~ rR~eiveri a B. ~ . from Denison He received a B. ~ . University in ~ 949, an M. A . in Engl ish 1 it erasure from Iowa Stat e University in 1950, and an M.~. in sociology and a Phil. in social psychology from the University of Michigan in 1956 and ~ 95B, respect ively. He has been engaged for 30 years in large-scale survey research in the United States, Europe, and Lat. in America in areas that include political behavior, mass/elite relationships, the daily allocation of time use, and perceptions of. the quality of life. 165 -

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166 ROY D'ANDRADE is professor of anthropology at the University of California, San Diego.- He received a B.A. from the University of Connecticut in 1957 and a Ph.D. in 1962 from Harvard University in social relations. He has previously taught at Stanford University and Rutgers University and has been a fellow of the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences. His principal research interests concern American culture and cognit ive anthropology. STEPHEN E. FIE2IBERG is professor of statistics and social science and head of the Department of Statistics at Carnegie-Mellon University. He received a B.Sc. in mathematics and statistics from the University of Toronto in 1964 and an M.A. and a Ph.D. in statistics from Harvard University in ?965 and 196B, respectively. He previously taught at the University of Chicago and at the University of Minnesota. His principal research has been on the development of statistical methodology, especially in connection with the analysis of cros~-classified categorical data, and on the application of statistics in such areas an accounting, criminal Justice, ecology, federal statistics, law, medicine and public health, neurophysiology, public policy, and sociology. He has served as chair of the Committee on National Statistics and in currently chair of its Panel on Statistical Assessments a-- Evidence in the Courts. ROBERT R. FtJCHSBERG is director of the Division of Health Interview Statistics at the National Center for Health Statistics in the U.S. Public Health Service. He received a B.S. in economics from City College of New York in 1949 and also did graduate work at the college in statistics. His interest in health surveys started in 1957 when he `Joined the National Health Survey Program as an analytical statistician. His main prote-~qional interests are the development of improved survey methods and training in survey methodology. During the past lO years he has developed techniques for adapting telephone procedures to the special needs of health surveys. As a consultant to the government of Portugal since 1980 he has assisted in the development and implementation of the Portuguese National Morbidity Survey. THOMAS B. JABINE is consultant to the Committee on National Statistics and professorial lecturer at George Washington University. He was formerly statistical policy expert for the Energy Information Administration, chief mathematical statistician for the Social Security Administration, and chief of the Statistical Research Division of the Bureau of the Census. Be received a B.S. in mathematics and an M.S. in economics and science from the Hassachusett~ institute of Technology in 1949. He has provided technical assistance in sampling and survey methods to several developing countries for the United Nations, the Organization of American States, and the U.S. Agency for International Development. His publications are primarily in the areas of sampling and survey methodology. WILLETT KEMPTON is research associate in the Family Energy ProJect at Michigan State University and adjunct assistant professor in the Department of Anthropology. He received a B.A. in 1972 from the University of Virginia in sociology and anthropology and a Ph. D. in 1977

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167 from the University of Texas, Austin, in cognitive anthropology. He received postdoctoral training in quantitative anthropology and public policy at the University of California, where he developed his interest in social and cognitive aspects of energy policy. His publications have dealt with cot or perception by speakers of Tarahumara and English, variat ion and change in folk classic icat ion syst ems, and home energy use. His current studies of home energy combine ethnographic, survey interview, and behavioral data. ELIZABETH LOFTUS is professor of psychology at the University of Washington, Seattle. She received a B.A. in mathematics and psychology from the University of California, Los Angeles, in 1966 and an M.A. and a Ph. D. in psychology from Stanford University in ~ 967 and ~ 970, respectively. Her principal research has been in the area of human cognition and memory. She is the author of 10 books, including ~ (Harvard University Press), which won a National Media Award from the American Psychological Foundation in ~ 980 . ALBERT MADANSRY is professor of business administration and director of the Center for the Management of Public and Nonprofit Enterprise in the Graduate School of Business of the University of Chicago. He received a B.A. in liberal arts in 1952, an M.S. in statistics in 1955, and a Ph. D. in statistics in ~ 95B, all from the University of Chicago. He has been a research mathematician at the RAND Corporation, senior rice president of a large advertising agency, president of a computer. software and data processing firm, professor and chairman of computer sciences at City College of New York, and fellow of the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences. Among his research interests is computer- assinted telephone inter~riewir~. ROBERT MANGOLD is the chief of the Health Surveys Branch of the Bureau of the Census. He received a B.S. from Duquesne University in t963 and an M. B . A . in ~ 965 from Ohio University. During his career at the Census Bureau, he has worked on various aspects of large national surveys, such as the National Health Interview Survey, the National Hospital Discharge Survey, the Survey of Neurological Disorders, the Surveys of Vet erans, the Current Population Survey, the Point of Purchase Survey, the National Longitudinal Surveys of Work Experience, and the Survey of Criminal Justice Employees. RENT H. MARQUIS is chic, of. the Center for Surrey Methods Research at the Bureau of the Census. He received a B.A. in psychology from Yale University in 1961 and a Ph.D. in social psychology from the University of Michigan in ~ 967. He has been a study director at Michigan' s Survey Research Center, where his methods research emphasized" cognitive and behavioral approaches to survey measures of health, employment, and crime victimization, and he has served as associate director of the Statistical Research Division at the Research Triangle Institute in North Carolina. While a senior social scientist at the RAND Corporation in Santa Monica, he designed and evaluated much of the measurement for a large social experiment concerned with the demand for health insurance. His current interests include research on non~ampling errors in surveys conducted by telephone and other methods.

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168 ANDREW ORTONY is professor of psychology and of education at ache University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where he has been since 1973. He hen an honors degree in philosophy from the University of Edinburgh, and a Ph.D. in in computer science from I`ondon University' Imperial Col' ege of Science and Technology. His primary areas of research are in the comprehension of language, with special interest in figurative language, and in the relation between affect and cognition. He has edited a widely read interdisciplinary volume, ~a" Thought (Cambridge university Press, 1979) and with Donald A. Norman in the series editor of ~ ~ to be published by Erlbaum Associates, Hilladale, N.J.~. S. JAMES PRESS is a professor and chairman of the Department of Statistics at the University of California, Riverside. He received a 8.A. in physics in 1950 from New York University, an M.S. in mathematics from the University of Southern California in 1955, and a Ph. D. in statistics from Stanford University in 1964. He has taught and done research at the University of Chicago, Yale University, the University of British Columbia, the University of. California, Los Angeles, the London School of Economics and Political Science, and University College, London. He has worked on statistical problem at Brookhaven National Laboratories, Northrop Aircraft Corporation, Douglas Aircraft Corporation, and the RAND Corporation. Hin research and numerous publications include work on various aspects or Bayesian inference, subjective probability, and group Judgment formulation involving sample surveys. LEE ROSS is a professor of psychology at Stanford University, where he has taught since 1970. He received a 8.A. from the University of Toronto in 1965 and a Ph.D. from Columbia University in 1969. His research inter- est~ are in the field of cognitive social psychology, and he has published several books and papers, particularly on strategies and sources of bias in lay inference and judgment. WILLIAM J. SALTER is a research scientist at Bolt Beranek and Newman, Inc., in Cambridge, Massachusetts. He received a B.S. in mathematics from the University of Chicago in 1969 and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in cognitive psychology from Yale University in 1980 and 1984, respectively. During the 1970s he worked at Abt Associates, Inc., in social program evaluation, policy analysis, and survey design and administration. His current research focuses on causal rezoning and the organization of beliefs, particularly in the domain of economics. His methodological interests center on applying the detailed theories of cognitive science within the context of large samples and subgroup differences in sample survey research. HOWARD SCHUMAN is director of the Survey Research Center, Institute for Social Research, and professor of sociology at the University of ~ Michigan. He received a B.A. in philosophy from Antioch College in 1953, an M.S. in psychology from Trinity University in 1956, and a Ph.D. in

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169 sociology (social relations) from Harvard University in 1962. Before going to Michigan, he spent three years as a research associate for Harvard 'a Center for International Affairs, half the time as field director for a survey research project in Bangladesh. His publications have dealt mainly with the nature of survey questions and interviewing, with attitude measurement and the attitude/behavior relation, and with their applications to social issues such an race, economic development, sentiments on war and peace. MONROE G. SIRKEN is associate director for research and methodology at the National Center for Health Statistics. He received a B.A. and an H.A. from the University of California, Los Angeles, in 1946 and 1947, respectively, and a Ph.D. from the University of Washington in 1950. He has taught at the University of California, Loo Angeles, the University of Washington, the University of California, Berkeley, and the University of North Carolina. His research interests and publications are primarily in the fields of sampling and measurement errors in large-acale surveys. MIRON L. STRAP is research director of the Committee on National Statis- tic~. Previously he taught at the University of California, Berkeley, and the London School of Economics and Political Science. He received a B.A. and an M.A. in mathematics from Carnegie-Mellon University in 1964 and 1965, respectively, and a Ph.D. in statistics from the University of Chicago in ~ 969. Hin interests and research are in statistical theory and a variety of applications of statistics, including environmental protection, epidemiology of skin cancer and of mental retardation, apportionment of funds by statistical formulae, linguistics, and the use of statistical assessments in the courts. ANNE M. SPRAGUE is a staff member of the Committee on National Statistics. She has a B.A. degree in anthropology from the University of Maryland. Her interest in surveys derives from graduate studies involving participant interviews, particularly as they pertain to the nomadic Rom. She hen conducted numerous consumer-oriented surveys and has designed and implemented ~ite-~necific realty surveys. ROGER TOVRANGEAU is the technical director for the New York office of the National Opinion Research Cent er . He received an A . B . in psychology and Engl ish from Cornell University in ~ 973 and a Ph . D . in psychology from Yale University in ~ 978. He has conducted research on cognitive and social-psychological topics and has served as a statistical consultant on a number of national surveys. He has also taught at Connecticut College, Yale University, and Columbia University. ENDEL TULVING is professor of psychology at the University of Toronto. He received a B.A. in 1953 from the University of Toronto and a Ph.D. in ~ 9 57 from Harvard University . From ~ 970 to 1975 he t aught at Yale University, and in 1977-1978 he spent a year at the University of Oxford as a Commonwealth Visit ing Professor . He has done experimental and theoretical research on h',man memory for over 25 years. His most recent book is ~ (Oxford University Press, 1983~.

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