APPENDIX A

PANEL AND STAFF BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

Arden L. Bement, Jr., is the Basil S. Turner Distinguished Professor of Engineering and director of the Midwest Superconductivity Consortium at Purdue University. Before this appointment in December 1992, he was vice president for science and technology at TRW, Inc. He joined TRW in 1980 as vice president for technical resources. Dr. Bement began his professional career in 1954 as a research metallurgist and reactor project engineer with the General Electric Company at the Hanford Atomic Products Operation, Richland, Washington. In 1965 he joined Battelle Memorial Institute as manager of the Metallurgy Research Department. Three years later, he became manager of the Fuels and Materials Department. In 1970, Dr. Bement joined the faculty of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology as professor of nuclear materials, and in 1976 became director of the Materials Science Office of the Defense Advanced Projects Agency. In 1979, he was appointed deputy undersecretary of defense for research and engineering. In 1990 the US Senate confirmed Dr. Bement as a member of the National Science Board for a term that expired in 1994. Dr. Bement is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, is a recipient of the Distinguished Civilian Service Medal of the Department of Defense, and holds an honorary doctorate of engineering from Cleveland State University. He received an EMet from the Colorado School of Mines, an MS from the University of Idaho, and a PhD from the University of Michigan. Dr. Bement has served on many advisory committees and boards for government agencies and nonprofit organizations.

Peter R. Bridenbaugh is retired executive vice president of the Aluminum Company of America (Alcoa). He also served as Alcoa's chief technical officer and vice president for research and development. Dr. Bridenbaugh holds a BS (1962) and an MS (1966) from Lehigh University, and a PhD (1968) from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is a member of the American Society of Metals, the American Institute of Mining and Metallurgical Engineers, the American Society for Engineering Education, the Industrial Research Institute, and Sigma Xi.

Leroy L. Chang is dean of science and professor of physics at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. He was with IBM's Thomas J. Watson Research Center from 1963 to 1968 and again from 1969 to 1992. From 1985 to 1992, he was manager of quantum structures. In 1968–1969 he was an associate professor of electrical engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He received the International Prize for New Materials (1985) from the American Physical Society, the David Sarnoff Award (1990) from the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers, and the Stuart Ballantine Medal (1993) from the Franklin Institute. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering and also a member of the Chinese Academy of Sciences.



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INTERNATIONAL BENCHMARKING OF US MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING RESEARCH APPENDIX A PANEL AND STAFF BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION Arden L. Bement, Jr., is the Basil S. Turner Distinguished Professor of Engineering and director of the Midwest Superconductivity Consortium at Purdue University. Before this appointment in December 1992, he was vice president for science and technology at TRW, Inc. He joined TRW in 1980 as vice president for technical resources. Dr. Bement began his professional career in 1954 as a research metallurgist and reactor project engineer with the General Electric Company at the Hanford Atomic Products Operation, Richland, Washington. In 1965 he joined Battelle Memorial Institute as manager of the Metallurgy Research Department. Three years later, he became manager of the Fuels and Materials Department. In 1970, Dr. Bement joined the faculty of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology as professor of nuclear materials, and in 1976 became director of the Materials Science Office of the Defense Advanced Projects Agency. In 1979, he was appointed deputy undersecretary of defense for research and engineering. In 1990 the US Senate confirmed Dr. Bement as a member of the National Science Board for a term that expired in 1994. Dr. Bement is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, is a recipient of the Distinguished Civilian Service Medal of the Department of Defense, and holds an honorary doctorate of engineering from Cleveland State University. He received an EMet from the Colorado School of Mines, an MS from the University of Idaho, and a PhD from the University of Michigan. Dr. Bement has served on many advisory committees and boards for government agencies and nonprofit organizations. Peter R. Bridenbaugh is retired executive vice president of the Aluminum Company of America (Alcoa). He also served as Alcoa's chief technical officer and vice president for research and development. Dr. Bridenbaugh holds a BS (1962) and an MS (1966) from Lehigh University, and a PhD (1968) from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is a member of the American Society of Metals, the American Institute of Mining and Metallurgical Engineers, the American Society for Engineering Education, the Industrial Research Institute, and Sigma Xi. Leroy L. Chang is dean of science and professor of physics at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. He was with IBM's Thomas J. Watson Research Center from 1963 to 1968 and again from 1969 to 1992. From 1985 to 1992, he was manager of quantum structures. In 1968–1969 he was an associate professor of electrical engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He received the International Prize for New Materials (1985) from the American Physical Society, the David Sarnoff Award (1990) from the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers, and the Stuart Ballantine Medal (1993) from the Franklin Institute. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering and also a member of the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

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INTERNATIONAL BENCHMARKING OF US MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING RESEARCH Daniel S. Chemla has been director of the Materials Science Division at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and professor in the Department of Physics at the University of California, Berkeley, since 1991. He was with AT&T Bell Laboratories as head of the Quantum Physics and Electronics Research Department from 1983 to 1990; from 1981 to 1983 he was a member of the technical staff, both in the Electronic Research Laboratory. Dr. Chemla has held the positions of department head and group leader with the Centre National d'Etudes des Telecommunications in Bageaux, France (1974–1981). He received a degree as Ingenieur Civil des Telecommunications (1965) from the Ecole Superieure Nationale des Telecommunications in Paris. He holds the Diplome d'Etudes Approfondies, Physique des Solides (1967), and a PhD (1972) from the University of Paris. He is co-recipient of the 1988 R. W. Wood prize from the Optical Society of America. He received the 1995 Quantum electronics Award of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers/Laser and Electro-Optical Society, and the 1995 Humboldt Research Award. Dr. Chemla is a fellow of the Physical Society of America, the IEEE-Laser and Electro-Optical Society, and the Optical Society of America. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. Uma Chowdhry is business planning and technology director for DuPont's Specialty Chemicals Businesses. Her career since receiving a PhD in materials science and engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1976 has been with DuPont. She has served in various technology management positions. She managed groups working on ceramic materials for electronic applications, superconductors, and catalysts for various heterogeneously catalyzed chemical processes. In 1995, she was appointed business director for a $400 million chemical intermediates business that commercialized two new technologies involving large-scale catalytic processes. Dr. Chowdhry's technical background is in ceramics processing and in heterogeneous catalysis; her current work is in management of technology for technology-based businesses. In 1996, she was elected membership in the National Academy of Engineering. Anthony G. Evans is Gordon McKay Professor of Materials Engineering at Harvard University 's Division of Applied Sciences (1994–present). Concurrently (1985–present), he is Alcoa Professor and codirector of the High Performance Composites Center in the Materials Department at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Previous to this he was Alcoa Professor and chair of the Materials Department. From 1978 to 1985 he was a professor in the Department of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering at the University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Evans holds a BSc (1964) and PhD (1967), both in metallurgy, from Imperial College in London. He is chair of the Defense Sciences Research Council, a vice president of the American Chemical Society, and a member of the National Materials Advisory Board. He is the recipient of many honors and awards and is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Paul Hagenmuller is professor emeritus at the University of Bordeaux (1994) and honorary director of the CNRS Solid State Chemistry Laboratory (1986), which he created in the 1960s. He is editor of many scientific journals and author or co-author of several hundred publications. He is a recipient of two von Humboldt prizes (1997 and 1990), the Gauss-Weber Medal from the University of Gottigen (1997), the Henri Moissan International Prize (1997), and a host of other honors and awards. Dr. Hagenmuller is a member or honorary member of the New York Academy of Sciences; European Academy of Arts, Sciences, and Humanities; the European

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INTERNATIONAL BENCHMARKING OF US MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING RESEARCH Academy; the International Academy of Ceramics; and the Materials Research Society of India, among others. He also holds several honorary professorships and degrees. Among his many military decorations is the Croix de Guerre with Palms (1949). James W. Mitchell is director of materials, reliability and ecology research at Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies (1995–present). He has been with AT&T Bell Laboratories since 1970 as a member of the technical staff (1970–1972), supervisor of the Inorganic Analysis Group (1972– 1975), head of the Analytical Chemistry Research (1975–1994), research fellow (1985), and head of the Process and Chemical Engineering Research Department (1994–1995). Dr. Mitchell received a BS in chemistry (1965) from the Agricultural & Technology State University of North Carolina in Greensboro and a PhD in analytical chemistry (1970) from Iowa State University in Ames. He received the Percy L. Julian Industrial Research Award (1981) from the National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers; the US Black Engineer of the Year Award (1993) from the Council of Engineering Deans of Historically Black Colleges and Universities; the Iowa State University, George Washington Carver Visiting Professorship Award (1994); and the AT&T Bell Laboratories Research Fellow Award (1985), among others. Dr. Mitchell is a fellow of the American Institute of Chemists, a member of the New York Academy of Sciences, the American Chemical Society, the National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers, and of the National Academy of Engineering. Donald R. Paul holds the Melvin H. Gertz Regents Chair in Chemical Engineering and is director of the Texas Materials Institute at the University of Texas at Austin. His research involves structure–property relationships and processing of polymers; his current work deals with polymer blends and membranes. Dr. Paul received a BS in chemical engineering from North Carolina State University and an MS and a PhD in chemical engineering from the University of Wisconsin. He is editor of Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research (published by the American Chemical Society) and serves on the editorial boards of the Journal of Applied Polymer Science, Polymer Engineering and Science, Polymer, the Journal of Membrane Science, the Journal of Polymer Science–Polymer Physics, and Polymer Contents. He has received numerous awards for teaching and research, including in 1988 his election to the National Academy of Engineering. Buddy D. Ratner is professor of bioengineering and chemical engineering at the University of Washington. He received a PhD (1972) in polymer chemistry from the Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn. From 1985 to 1996 he directed the National Institutes of Health-funded National ESCA and Surface Analysis Center for Biomedical Problems. In 1996, he assumed the directorship of the University of Washington's engineered biomaterials research center, which is funded by NSF. He is the coeditor of the journal Plasmas and Polymers, a past president of the Society for Biomaterials, and author of more than 250 scholarly works. Dr. Ratner is a fellow of the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering, the American Vacuum Society, and the Society for Biomaterials. His research interests include biomaterials, polymers, biocompatibility, surface analysis of organic materials, self assembly, and rf–plasma thin-film deposition.

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INTERNATIONAL BENCHMARKING OF US MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING RESEARCH Kathleen C. Taylor is head of the Physics and Physical Chemistry Department of the General Motors Global Research and Development Center. She is responsible for management of research and development in materials science with primary responsibility for 85 PhD, MS, and BS engineers and scientists involved in research programs in exhaust emission control, catalysis, surface chemistry, air pollution control, advanced batteries, fuel cells, corrosion, protective and wear-resistant coatings, light metals, magnetic and optical materials, and chemical and magnetic field sensors. Dr. Taylor was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1995, and she is a member of the American Chemical Society, the Materials Research Society, and a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Society of Automotive Engineers International. Robert M. White is university professor and head of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Carnegie-Mellon University. Before joining CMU in 1993, he served during the Bush Administration as the first undersecretary of commerce for technology. Before going to Washington, he spent 6 years with Control Data Corporation, first as vice president of research for CDC's Data Storage Products Group and then as the corporation's chief technical officer and as a member of the CDC Management Board. Dr. White's early career was spent in teaching and research. He was an assistant professor of physics at Stanford University and was principal scientist at Xerox's Palo Alto Research Center for 13 years. He is the author of 4 books and more than 100 technical publications on condensed-matter physics and magnetic recording. White received a BS (1960) in physics from Massachusetts Institute of Technology and his PhD (1964), also in physics, from Stanford. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a fellow of the American Physical Society, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. In 1980, he received the Alexander von Humboldt Prize from Germany, and in 1993 the IEEE Award for Contributions to Public Service. He is a director of SGS-Thomson Microelectronics, Zilog, and Ontrack Data International. Masaharu Yamaguchi is professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Kyoto University, Japan (1987–present). From 1973 to 1987 he was with Osaka University as an associate professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering. From 1965 to 1973 he was a research associate in the Department of Metallurgy. Dr. Yamaguchi received his BSc (1963), MSc (1965), and PhD (1969) from Osaka University. He also is Editor of Intermetallics for Elsevier Science Publishers. Dr. Yamaguchi received the Meritorious Activity Medal (1983) and the Tanigawa-Harris Medal (1995), both from the Japan Institute of Metals.

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INTERNATIONAL BENCHMARKING OF US MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING RESEARCH Staff Deborah D. Stine is the study director and associate director of the Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy (COSEPUP). She has worked on various projects throughout the National Academy of Sciences complex since 1989. She received a National Research Council group award for her first study for COSEPUP on policy implications of greenhouse warming, and a Commission on Life Sciences staff citation for her work in risk assessment and management. Other studies have addressed graduate education, responsible conduct of research, careers in science and engineering, environmental remediation, the national biological survey, and corporate environmental stewardship. Dr. Stine holds a bachelor's degree in mechanical and environmental engineering from the University of California, Irvine; a master's degree in business administration; and a PhD in public administration, specializing in policy analysis, from the American University. Before coming to the academy, she was a mathematician for the US Air Force, an air-pollution engineer for the state of Texas, and an air-issues manager for the Chemical Manufacturers Association. Lawrence E. McCray is executive director of the Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy (COSEPUP). He held positions in the Environmental Protection Agency, the US Regulatory Council, and the Office of Management and Budget before coming to the National Academy of Sciences in 1981. He has directed academy studies in carcinogenic risk assessment, export controls, nuclear winter, and federal science budgeting. A Fulbright scholar in 1968, Dr. McCray received the Schattschneider Award in 1972 from the American Political Science Association for the best dissertation in American government and politics. In 1987, he received the National Research Council staff award. Dr. McCray joined COSEPUP in 1988 as executive director and since 1994 has served concurrently as the director of the National Research Council Policy Division. Patrick P. Sevcik is a research associate with the Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy (COSEPUP). He works on a variety of projects for COSEPUP, the Policy Division (PD), and the PD Office of Special Projects, assisting Deborah Stine and Lawrence McCray. Before coming to the National Research Council in 1993, he was an assistant program officer with the International Republican Institute from 1990 to 1993, working on democracy development, primarily in central and eastern Europe. Mr. Sevcik has held positions at the White House in the Office of Political Affairs (1989–1990) and on Capitol Hill (1987–1988) in the office of Rep. John DioGuardi (R-NY). During that time, he also held concurrent positions in several Slovak–American organizations. He holds a BA in international affairs, with an emphasis on Soviet and Eastern European studies, from the George Washington University. He has also studied Russian language and culture at the Leningrad Polytechnic Institute in Leningrad. Mr. Sevcik will begin an MS program in health sciences management and policy at New York Medical College in June 1998.

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