APPENDIX

PANEL AND STAFF BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

Irving L. Weissman (Chair) received his MD from Stanford University in 1965. He pursued training in experimental pathology at Oxford University and continued his postgraduate fellowship at Stanford University. Dr. Weissman is the Karel and Avice Beekhuis Professor of Cancer Biology, professor of pathology, professor of developmental biology, and, by courtesy professor of biological sciences at Stanford University. He has received the Outstanding Investigator Award from the National Institutes of Health, the Pasarow Award for Outstanding Contribution to Cancer Biology and the Harvey Lecture, and the Montana Conservationist of the Year Award. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the California Academy of Medicine, and the Israel Immunological Society. He has served as president of the American Association of Immunologists. He was the cofounder of the biotechnology companies Systemix, Inc., and Stem Cells, Inc.

James Allison received his PhD from the University of Texas, Austin in 1973. He did postdoctoral work at the Scripps Clinic and Research Foundation in La Jolla. Dr. Allison is professor of immunology, director of the Cancer Research Laboratory, and a Howard Hughes Medical Investigator at the University of California, Berkeley. Selected awards and honors include a merit award from the National Institutes of Health and, election into the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Microbiology. He serves as a councilor to the American Association of Immunologists and is a member of the Board of Scientific Counselors for the National Cancer Institute.

Frederick W. Alt received his PhD in biological sciences at Stanford University, where he worked with Robert Schimke and discovered the phenomenon of gene amplification in the context of cellular resistance to anticancer drugs. In 1982, he joined the faculty of the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University in New York, where he became professor of biochemistry and molecular biophysics and, professor of microbiology. In 1987, he became a Howard Hughes Medical Investigator at Columbia University. In 1991, Dr. Alt became senior investigator at the Center for Blood Research in Boston, in addition to serving as a Howard Hughes Investigator at Boston's Children's Hospital. He is professor of genetics and pediatrics at Harvard Medical School, chair of the NIH allergy and immunology study section and of the Irvington Institute Scientific Advisory Board. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Microbiology, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Among his many honors are the Irma T. Hirschl Career Scientist Award, the Searle Scholars Award, the Mallinckrodt Scholar Award, and an NIH Merit Award.

Harald von Boehmer studied medicine at the Universities of Gottingen, Frieburg and Munich and prepared his medical thesis at the Max Planck Institute for Biochemistry. He is an adjunct professor in the Department of Pathology, University of Florida, Gainsville, and professor of immunology, University of Basel, and, Faculte de Medecine Necker Enfants Malades, Descartes University, Paris. He is the director of 373 of the National Unite Institute of Science and Medical Research, France. He is a member of the Institut Universitaire de France,



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 57
INTERNATIONAL BENCHMARKING OF US IMMUNOLOGY RESEARCH APPENDIX PANEL AND STAFF BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION Irving L. Weissman (Chair) received his MD from Stanford University in 1965. He pursued training in experimental pathology at Oxford University and continued his postgraduate fellowship at Stanford University. Dr. Weissman is the Karel and Avice Beekhuis Professor of Cancer Biology, professor of pathology, professor of developmental biology, and, by courtesy professor of biological sciences at Stanford University. He has received the Outstanding Investigator Award from the National Institutes of Health, the Pasarow Award for Outstanding Contribution to Cancer Biology and the Harvey Lecture, and the Montana Conservationist of the Year Award. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the California Academy of Medicine, and the Israel Immunological Society. He has served as president of the American Association of Immunologists. He was the cofounder of the biotechnology companies Systemix, Inc., and Stem Cells, Inc. James Allison received his PhD from the University of Texas, Austin in 1973. He did postdoctoral work at the Scripps Clinic and Research Foundation in La Jolla. Dr. Allison is professor of immunology, director of the Cancer Research Laboratory, and a Howard Hughes Medical Investigator at the University of California, Berkeley. Selected awards and honors include a merit award from the National Institutes of Health and, election into the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Microbiology. He serves as a councilor to the American Association of Immunologists and is a member of the Board of Scientific Counselors for the National Cancer Institute. Frederick W. Alt received his PhD in biological sciences at Stanford University, where he worked with Robert Schimke and discovered the phenomenon of gene amplification in the context of cellular resistance to anticancer drugs. In 1982, he joined the faculty of the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University in New York, where he became professor of biochemistry and molecular biophysics and, professor of microbiology. In 1987, he became a Howard Hughes Medical Investigator at Columbia University. In 1991, Dr. Alt became senior investigator at the Center for Blood Research in Boston, in addition to serving as a Howard Hughes Investigator at Boston's Children's Hospital. He is professor of genetics and pediatrics at Harvard Medical School, chair of the NIH allergy and immunology study section and of the Irvington Institute Scientific Advisory Board. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Microbiology, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Among his many honors are the Irma T. Hirschl Career Scientist Award, the Searle Scholars Award, the Mallinckrodt Scholar Award, and an NIH Merit Award. Harald von Boehmer studied medicine at the Universities of Gottingen, Frieburg and Munich and prepared his medical thesis at the Max Planck Institute for Biochemistry. He is an adjunct professor in the Department of Pathology, University of Florida, Gainsville, and professor of immunology, University of Basel, and, Faculte de Medecine Necker Enfants Malades, Descartes University, Paris. He is the director of 373 of the National Unite Institute of Science and Medical Research, France. He is a member of the Institut Universitaire de France,

OCR for page 57
INTERNATIONAL BENCHMARKING OF US IMMUNOLOGY RESEARCH Academia Europaea, the European Molecular Biology Organization, the New York Academy of Sciences, Gesellschaft fur Immunologie, the American Association of Immunologists, and the Scandinavian Society for Immunology. Dr. von Boehmer has been awarded the Louis Jeantet Prize for Medicine, the Avery-Landsteiner Prize for Immunology, the Paul Ehrlich and Ludwig Darmstaedt Prize, and the Korber Prize for European Science. He chairs the Executive Committee of the European Journal of Immunology. Max D. Cooper received his MD (1957) and training in Pediatrics (1958-1960) at Tulane Medical School. He was a house officer and research assistant at the Hospital for Sick Children, London(1960-1961), and a pediatric-allergy fellow at the University of California, San Francisco Medical Center (1961-1962). His postdoctoral research in the laboratory of Robert Good (1963-1967), led to the definition of separate T- and B-cell lineages. Dr. Cooper is professor of medicine, pediatrics, pathology, and microbiology at the University of Alabama at Birmingham; senior scientist at the University of Alabama Comprehensive Cancer Center; professor of medicine and director of the Division of Developmental and Clinical Immunology at the University of Alabama; and a Howard Hughes Medical Investigator. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and in 1990 was elected to the Institute of Medicine. He was inducted as a fellow in the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Dr. Cooper served as president of the American Association of Immunologists and of the Clinical Immunology Society. Among his awards are the 3M Life Sciences Award, the Sandoz Prize for Immunology, and the American College of Physicians Award. Irwin Feller is the director of the Institute for Policy Research and Evaluation and professor of economics at the Pennsylvania State University, where he has been on the faculty since 1963. Dr. Feller was an American Society for Mechanical Engineering Pennsylvania State Fellow for 1996-1997. Dr. Feller's research interests include the economics of academic research, the university's role in technology-based economic development, and the evaluation of federal and state technology programs. He was chair of the Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy, American Association for the Advancement of Science. Laurie H. Glimcher received her MD at Harvard Medical School in 1976. She was an intern and resident at Massachusetts General Hospital and a postdoctoral fellow under the direction of William Paul at the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Glimcher is a physician in the Division of Rheumatology and Immunology at Brigham and Women's Hospital, professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, and Irene Heinz Given Professor of Immunology at the Harvard School of Public Health. She received a Merit Award from NIH, was elected into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and received the Lee S. Howley Award from the Arthritis Foundation. She serves on the corporate board of directors for Bristol-Myers Squibb. She is a councilor of the American Association of Immunologists. David V. Goeddel received his PhD in biochemistry in 1977 from the University of Colorado in Boulder. He was a postdoctoral fellow at the Stanford Research Institute. Dr. Goeddel is the president and chief executive officer of Tularik, Inc. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the National Academy of Sciences, and the American Academy of Microbiology. Dr. Goeddel serves on the editorial review boards of Immunity and Nature Biotechnology. His research interests include cytokine signaling mechanisms and small-molecule therapeutics that act through regulation of gene expression.

OCR for page 57
INTERNATIONAL BENCHMARKING OF US IMMUNOLOGY RESEARCH Hugh McDevitt received his MD from Harvard Medical School in 1955. He was an intern in medicine at Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, a resident in medicine at Bellevue Hospital, and a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Bacteriology and Immunology at Harvard Medical School. Dr. McDevitt is professor of medicine and of microbiology and immunology at Stanford University School of Medicine. He has received the 3M Life Sciences Award, the Paul Erlich Prize, and Outstanding Investigator Award from NCI and NIH, the Barbara Davis Diabetes Award, and the Paul Klemperer Award from the New York Academy of Sciences. He became a member of the National Academy of Sciences in 1977, of the Institute of Medicine in 1983, and of the Royal Society of London in 1994. Diane Mathis received a doctorate in biology from the University of Rochester, New York in 1977. She is the directeur of research, INSERM, LGME, and Institut de Genetique et de Biologie Moleculaire et Cellulaire (IGBMC) in Strasbourg, France. She serves on the editorial boards of the European Journal of Immunology, Immunology Today, Comptes Rendus de l'Academie des Sciences de Paris, Science, Cell, Current Biology, Journal of Experimental Medicine, and Immunity. Gustav Nossal studied medicine at the University of Sydney and after 2 years of residency at the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital moved to Melbourne to work as a research fellow at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research, where he received a PhD. Apart from 2 years as an assistant professor of genetics at Stanford University, 1 year at the Pasteur Institute in Paris, and 1 year as a special consultant to the World Health Organization, Sir Nossal's research career has been at the Hall Institute. He was the director of the institute from 1965 until he retired in 1996. Sir Nossal was also professor of Medical Biology at the University of Melbourne. Sir Nossal's eminence in immunology has been recognized by his election as president of the 25,000-member International Union of Immunological Societies. Included among his international honors is his election to the US National Academy of Sciences and his membership in the Academic des Sciences (France). He has also served as president of the Australian Academy of Science and chair of the global programme for vaccines and immunization of the World Health Organization. Sir Nossal was knighted in 1977 and made a Companion of the Order of Australia in 1989. Roger M. Perlmutter received his MD and PhD from Washington University (St. Louis) in 1979. Thereafter, he pursued clinical training in internal medicine at the Massachusetts General Hospital and the University of California, San Francisco. He was a lecturer in the Division of Biology at the California Institute of Technology, where he studied the genetic basis of antibody repertoire diversification. He joined the departments of medicine and biochemistry and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute at the University of Washington (Seattle), where he became professor and founding chair of the Department of Immunology. In 1997, he left the University of Washington to assume responsibility for drug-discovery efforts at the Merck Research Laboratories in Rahway, NJ. Dr. Perlmutter has served on numerous scientific advisory and review panels and is a councilor of the American Association of Immunologists and a member of the Board of Directors of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. Craig B. Thompson received his MD from the University of Pennsylvania in 1977. His internship and residency were at the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital. Dr. Thompson is a

OCR for page 57
INTERNATIONAL BENCHMARKING OF US IMMUNOLOGY RESEARCH professor in the Department of Medicine and Molecular Genetics and Cell Biology at the University of Chicago and a Howard Hughes Medical Investigator. He has received the Jerome W. Conn Award for Distinguished Research by a Junior Faculty Member. He serves on the editorial boards of Cell, Immunity, and International Immunology. Don C. Wiley was an NSF graduate fellow in biophysics at Harvard University and received his PhD in biophysics in 1971. Dr. Wiley is a professor of biochemistry and biophysics at Harvard University, a Howard Hughes Medical Investigator, a research associate in medicine at the Boston Children's Hospital, and an affiliate of the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology at Harvard University. He has been elected to numerous honorary societies, including the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the National Academy of Sciences. Among his awards are the Louisa Gross Horwitz Prize, the William B. Coley Award for Distinguished Research in Fundamental Immunology, the V.D. Mattia Award, the Passano Foundation Award, the Emil von Behring Prize, the Gairdner Foundation International Award, the Albert Lasker Basic Medical Research Award, and the Rose Payne Distinguished Scientist Award. Staff Deborah D. Stine is the study director and associate director of the Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy (COSEPUP). She has worked on various projects throughout the National Academy of Sciences complex since 1989. She received a National Research Council group award for her first study for COSEPUP on policy implications of greenhouse warming and a Commission on Life Sciences staff citation for her work in risk assessment and management. Other studies have addressed graduate education, responsible conduct of research, careers in science and engineering, environmental remediation, the national biological survey, and corporate environmental stewardship. Dr. Stine received a PhD in public administration, specializing in policy analysis, from the American University. Before coming to the Academy, she was a mathematician for the US Air Force, an air-pollution engineer for the state of Texas, and an air-issues manager for the Chemical Manufacturers Association. Tamara Zemlo is a Cancer Prevention Fellow at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), where she is researching the risk factors for the progression of low-grade cervical disease to cervical cancer. She is also participating in analyzing data from the ASCUS/LSIL Triage Study, which is an NCI-sponsored clinical trial designed to determine the optimal management plan for low-grade cervical cytologic abnormalities. She received a Ph.D. in oncology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where she studied the transforming properties of papillomavirus replication proteins in tissue culture, and a Master's of Public Health from Harvard University. As part of her postdoctoral training, she has an internship at COSEPUP.