Appendix C
Biographical Summaries

Committee Members

FRED A. METTLER, JR., M.D., M.P.H. (Chairman), is professor and chairman of the Department of Radiology at the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center in Albuquerque, New Mexico. His area of expertise is medical effects of ionizing radiation. He is the United States representative to the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR), a commissioner of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), and a scientific vice-president of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP). Dr. Mettler has served as a consultant to the Peace Corps, the World Health Organization, and the International Atomic Energy Agency and was the Health Effects Team Leader for the International Chernobyl Project.

JOHN F. AHEARNE, Ph.D., is currently Director of the Sigma Xi Center; Adjunct Scholar, Resources for the Future; and Adjunct Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Lecturer in Public Policy, Duke University. He has served as Executive Director for Sigma Xi, the Scientific Research Society; Vice President and Senior Fellow for Resources for the Future; Commissioner and Chairman of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission; and held numerous positions within the Department of Defense and the Department of Energy. He chaired the National Research Council Committee on the Environmental Management Science Program, chairs the Committee to Review the Research Activities Completed Under the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT), has served on many other NRC committees, and is a member of the Board on Radioactive Waste Management. Dr. Ahearne received a bachelor's degree in engineering physics and an M.S. in physics from Cornell University, and an M.A. and Ph.D. in physics from Princeton. He is a member of the National Academy of Engi-



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--> Appendix C Biographical Summaries Committee Members FRED A. METTLER, JR., M.D., M.P.H. (Chairman), is professor and chairman of the Department of Radiology at the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center in Albuquerque, New Mexico. His area of expertise is medical effects of ionizing radiation. He is the United States representative to the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR), a commissioner of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), and a scientific vice-president of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP). Dr. Mettler has served as a consultant to the Peace Corps, the World Health Organization, and the International Atomic Energy Agency and was the Health Effects Team Leader for the International Chernobyl Project. JOHN F. AHEARNE, Ph.D., is currently Director of the Sigma Xi Center; Adjunct Scholar, Resources for the Future; and Adjunct Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Lecturer in Public Policy, Duke University. He has served as Executive Director for Sigma Xi, the Scientific Research Society; Vice President and Senior Fellow for Resources for the Future; Commissioner and Chairman of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission; and held numerous positions within the Department of Defense and the Department of Energy. He chaired the National Research Council Committee on the Environmental Management Science Program, chairs the Committee to Review the Research Activities Completed Under the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT), has served on many other NRC committees, and is a member of the Board on Radioactive Waste Management. Dr. Ahearne received a bachelor's degree in engineering physics and an M.S. in physics from Cornell University, and an M.A. and Ph.D. in physics from Princeton. He is a member of the National Academy of Engi-

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--> neering, Society for Risk Analysis, and American Nuclear Society and a fellow of the American Physical Society, American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the AAAS. GEORGE J. ANNAS, J.D., M.P.H., is professor and chair, Health Law Department, Boston University School of Public Health, and professor at Boston University Medical School and Boston University Law School. He is the cochair of the Committee on Medical Practice and Medical Research of the American Bar Association's Science and Technology Section and the cofounder of Global Lawyers and Physicians, an organization dedicated to promoting health and human rights. He is an expert on health law and bioethics, author or editor of a dozen books, including The Rights of Patients, and writes a regular feature on "Legal Issues in Medicine" for the New England Journal of Medicine. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine and a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. WILLIAM J BAIR, Ph.D., is retired from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, operated by Battelle Memorial Institute, where he held the position of Manager of the Life Sciences Center. His employment at the Hanford, Washington site was from 1954 to 1993. He holds a Ph.D. in Radiation Biology from the University of Rochester. His research was focused on the health effects of radionuclides, particularly with respect to deposition in the respiratory tract, with emphasis on plutonium and other transuranic elements. He has served on or chaired numerous Atomic Energy Commission and Department of Energy committees concerned with potential plutonium-caused health effects. He was a member of a National Academy of Sciences committee on "Hot Particles" and was vice chairman of the committee on Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation, Alpha Radiation (BIER IV). He served on Committee 2 on Derived Limits of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and was a member of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) for over 20 years. He was elected an honorary member of the NCRP. He currently is a member of the Science Advisory Board and Radiation Advisory Committee of the Environmental Protection Agency. He is a recipient of the E.O. Lawrence Award from the Atomic Energy Commission, the Distinguished Scientific Achievement Award of the Health Physics Society, Distinguished Achievement Citation from Ohio Wesleyan University, and was the NCRP Lauriston Taylor Lecturer in 1997. He is a fellow of the AAAS and the Health Physics Society. RUTH R. FADEN, Ph.D., M.P.H., is the Philip Franklin Wagley Professor of Biomedical Ethics and Director of the Bioethics Institute, The Johns Hopkins University. She is also a Senior Research Scholar at the Kennedy Institute of Ethics, Georgetown University. Dr. Faden is the author and editor of numerous books and articles on biomedical ethics and health policy including "A History and Theory of Informed Consent" (with Tom L. Beauchamp); "AIDS, Women

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--> and the Next Generation" (Ruth Faden, Gail Geller, and Madison Powers, eds.); and "HIV, AIDS and Childbearing: Public Policy, Private Lives" (Ruth Faden and Nancy Kass, eds.). Dr. Faden is a member of the Institute of Medicine and a Fellow of the Hastings Center and the American Psychological Association. She serves frequently on national advisory committees and commissions. Most recently, she was the chair of the President's Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments. Dr. Faden holds a B.A. from the University of Pennsylvania, an M.A. in General Studies in Humanities from the University of Chicago, and a M.P.H. and Ph.D. (Program in Attitudes and Behavior) from the University of California, Berkeley. SHIRLEY A. FRY, M.B., B.Ch., B.A.O., M.P.H., Senior Advisor, Oak Ridge Associated Universities, is a physician specializing in radiation and occupational epidemiology. Her experience and interests also include the medical aspects of radiation accidents and the acute health effects of radiation. As Scientific Director of the Washington-based International Consortium for Research on the Health Effects of Radiation, she currently directs epidemiologic studies being conducted by collaborative research teams at institutions in the United States, republics of the former Soviet Union, and Israel. Committee service includes the Health Effects Group of the US-USSR Joint Coordinating Council on Nuclear Reactor Safety, the Senior Technical Review Group of the Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium, and the Uranium Task Group of the National Council for Radiation Protection and Measurements. Dr. Fry chairs the Oak Ridge Associated Universities/Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Institutional Review Board and is a member of several professional societies including the Radiation Research and Health Physics Societies, and the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine. LAWRENCE O. GOSTIN, J.D., L.L.D. (Hon.), is Professor of Law at Georgetown University Law Center, Professor of Law and Public Health at the Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health, and the Co-Director of the Johns Hopkins/Georgetown University Program on Law and Public Health. Professor Gostin is also a Fellow of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics of Georgetown University and a member of the Steering and Executive Committees of the Georgetown University Institute for Health Care Research and Policy. Professor Gostin is the Editor of the "Health Law and Ethics" section of the Journal of the American Medical Association. RAYMOND H. JOHNSON, JR., M.S., CHP, is a Certified Health Physicist and Licensed Professional Engineer. He is the President of Communication Sciences Institute, Inc. and the Director of CSI-Radiation Safety Training since 1985. He has managed a contract for radiation safety services at the National Institutes of Health since 1988. He has served as President of Key Technology, Inc., a radon measurement company since 1990. From 1986 to 1988 he served as

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--> Laboratory Director for radiochemical analyses with the Radiation Service Organization. He retired as a Commissioned Officer (0-6) with the U.S. Public Health Service in 1985 with 28 years of service. From 1970 to 1985 he was assigned to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency where he served as Chief of the Radiation Surveillance Branch in the Office of Radiation Programs. He has a B.S. in Civil Engineering from the University of Vermont and Master's and Professional Engineer's degrees from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University. He conducted Ph.D. studies in radiochemistry at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute from 1966 to 1972. He is currently President-elect of the Health Physics Society. He has served six years on the HPS Executive Committee and Board of Directors as Secretary and Treasurer. He is also President of the American Association of Radon Scientists and Technologists and President of the National Radon Safety Board. He is also a member of the American Nuclear Society, the Society for Risk Analysis, the American Industrial Hygiene Association, the Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors, and the Association for Psychological Type. LEONARD D. MILLER is a retired U.S. Army Brigadier General. His background includes command of nuclear-capable field artillery units from battery to corps artillery level and command of Field Command, Defense Nuclear Agency (now Defense Special Weapons Agency) (1992-1993). Knowledgeable areas include command, control, communications, and Army organizations and operations. WILLIAM A. MILLS, Ph.D., is self-employed, providing consulting services in radiation safety with emphasis on science, policy, and regulations. His prior radiation safety experience of more than forty years includes senior positions in the U.S. Public Health Service, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education. Dr. Mills is a Fellow and Past President of the Health Physics Society, an Executive Council member of the International Radiation Protection Association, and a former member of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. BERNHARD T. MITTEMEYER, M.D., currently serves as professor of surgery (urology) at the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center where he also served as Executive Vice President and Provost from November 1986 to October 1996, during which time he also served concomitantly as Dean of the Medical School for three years. From March of 1985 to October of 1986, Dr. Mittemeyer was the Senior Vice President and Medical Director for Whittaker Health Services, a managed health care organization and subsidiary company of Whittaker Corporation in Los Angeles, CA. Prior to March 1985, Dr. Mittemeyer served as an officer in the U.S. Army Medical Department for 28 years, rising to the rank of Lieutenant General and Surgeon General of the U.S. Army.

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--> In addition to the above, other key military assignments included: Commander, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Chief of the Medical Corps and Director of Professional Services, Commander of the 121 Evacuation Hospital in Korea and U.S. Forces Korea Surgeon, Chairman of Surgery and prior to that Chief of the Urology Division at Walter Reed Army Medical Center, and Medical Battalion Commander and Division Surgeon of the 101st Airborne Division in Vietnam. THEODORE L. PHILLIPS, M.D., is Wun-kon Fu Distinguished Professor in the Department of Radiation Oncology and Associate Director of the Cancer Center at the University of California, San Francisco. He is past president of the Radiation Research Society and the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology. Dr. Phillips is a member of the Institute of Medicine and recently served on its committee reviewing the NRC Medical Use Programs. He is a member of the Radiation Effects Research Foundation Scientific Council, which evaluates late effects of the atomic bomb exposures in Japan. His research has focused on late effects of radiation on tissues and on the treatment of brain tumors. He served on active duty at the U.S. Naval Radiological Defense Laboratory between 1963 and 1965. GENEVIEVE S. ROESSLER, Ph.D., is associate professor emeritus, Nuclear and Radiological Sciences, University of Florida. She currently lives in Minnesota and is the editor-in-chief of the Health Physics Society's newsletter and the Society for Risk Analysis newsletter. Her areas of expertise include radiological risk, radiation biology, nuclear medicine, and health physics. She is a member of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements; the Environmental Protection Agency Science Advisory Board; and the Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium, Senior Technical Review Group. Dr. Roessler served on the Technical Steering Panel of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project for eight years and teaches radiological risk courses for the Department of Energy. She is a Past President and a Fellow of the Health Physics Society. She received the Society's Founders Award and is a former editor-in-chief of the journal Health Physics. RAYMOND L. SPHAR, M.D., M.P.H., a retired Navy physician, has served as Director, Undersea and Radiation Medicine in the Navy Surgeon General's office and as chair of the Navy's Radiation Effects Advisory Board. He was director of two Navy medical research laboratories engaged in operational, behavioral and epidemiological research and, subsequently, was chief of research for the Department of Veterans Affairs. He is a fellow of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia.

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--> Staff SUSAN THAUL, Ph.D., assumed the role of study director for the second year of the BREC project, having worked on both the BREC interim report and the mortality studies of participants at U.S. nuclear tests. Dr. Thaul had previously led IOM projects on women's health, national statistics, and health services research, among others. She received a Ph.D. in epidemiology from Columbia University and an M.S. in health policy and management from Harvard University. Heading the health staff of the U.S. Senate Committee on Veterans' Affairs (then chaired by Sen. Cranston), Dr. Thaul developed legislation in preventive health care and research, women's health care, sexual assault services and prevention, nurse and physician pay, and health effects of environmental hazards during service. Earlier positions were with the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research; the Harlem Hospital Prevention of Prematurity Project; and the NYC Health and Hospitals Corporation, where she held successive positions leading to Associate Director of the NYC Emergency Medical Service. J. CHRISTOPHER JOHNSON, Ph.D., CHP, developed this study and was its initial study director. A health physicist, after retiring from the U.S. Army at the rank of Lt. Colonel, Dr. Johnson joined the staff of the Medical Follow-up Agency to pursue studies involving veterans who had participated in atomic weapons tests. He directed the epidemiological study of Operation CROSSROADS and served as study director for a substantial period of an ongoing study of five other nuclear test series. In the Army, he was chief of medical physics for the Army Materiel Command, Office of the Surgeon. Dr. Johnson received a B.S. in physics from the Worcester Polytechnic Institute, an M.S. in electrical engineering (biomedical option) from Kansas State, and his Ph.D. in nuclear engineering (medical physics option) from the University of Missouri-Columbia. He also holds CHP certification from the American Board of Health Physics. HEATHER O'MAONAIGH began working as a research assistant for the Medical Follow-up Agency in June 1998. She is currently working toward her master's degree in demography at Georgetown University, having earned a B.S. in sociology from Western Washington University. STEVEN L. SIMON, Ph.D., is a senior staff officer with the Board on Radiation Effects Research. He received his bachelor and master's degrees in physics from the University of Texas and his doctorate from Colorado State University in radiological health sciences. His specialties are measurement of ionizing radiation, in particular, in-situ gamma spectrometry and dosimetry/dose reconstruction. His present interests pertain mainly to evaluation of environmental contamination and related exposures (past and present), and radiation-related health effects. He previously held positions as medical dosimetrist for pion radiotherapy at Los Alamos, assistant professor at the University of North Carolina

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--> at Chapel Hill and director of the Marshall Islands Nationwide Radiological Study from 1990 through 1995. He has conducted dosimetry evaluations in support of radioepidemiologic studies of thyroid disease and leukemia in Utah and directed a large thyroid-disease study in the Marshall Islands. He has participated in a variety of radiologic monitoring and assessments related to nuclear testing at sites worldwide including the Nevada Test Site, Marshall Islands, Mururoa-French Polynesia, and Semipalatinsk, Khazakstan. Presently, he is an adjunct faculty member at Colorado State University and associate editor of Health Physics and a member of the Health Physics Society, Society of Risk Analysis, Sigma Xi, and the International Union of Radioecologists. He has been with the National Academy of Sciences since 1997.