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BIBLIOGRAPHY Alberts, B. M., K. I. Shine, and W. A. Wulf. 1998. Actions are needed to promote research sharing , Statement, September 8; available on-line at (www2.nas.edu/new/21be.html). Blumenthal, D., E. Campbell, N. Causino, and K. Louis. 1996. Participation of Life-Science Faculty in Research Relationships with Industry. New England Journal of Medicine 23: 1734-1739. Branscomb, L., R. Florida, D. Hart, J. Kellar, and D. Boville. 1997. Investing in Innovation: Toward a Consensus Strategy for Federal Technology Policy. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press. Bush, V. 1990. Science—The Endless Frontier: A Report to the President on a Program for Postwar Scientific Research. Reprint. Washington, D.C.: National Science Foundation. Carnegie Commission on Science, Technology, and Government. 1992. Enabling the Future: Linking Science and Technology to Societal Goals. New York: Carnegie Commission on Science, Technology, and Government. Coburn, C., ed. 1995. Partnerships: A Compendium of State and Federal Cooperative Technology Partnerships. Columbus, Ohio: Battelle Press. Conference Board. 1997. Perspectives on a Global Economy. Technology, Productivity, and Growth: U.S. and German Issues. New York: The Conference Board. COSEPUP (Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy). 1999. Capitalizing on Investments in Science and Technology. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press. Council of Economic Advisors. 1995. Supporting Research and Development to Promote Economic Growth: The Federal Government's Role. Washington, D.C.: Council of Economic Advisors; available on-line at (www.whitehouse.gov/WH/EOP/CEA/econ/html/econ-top.html). Council on Competitiveness. 1996. Endless Frontier, Limited Resources: U.S. R&D Policy for Competitiveness. Washington, D.C.: Council on Competitiveness. Government-University-Industry Research Roundtable. 1998a. National Science and Technology Strategies in a Global Context: Report of a Symposium. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press. Government-University-Industry Research Roundtable. 1998b. Openness and Secrecy in Research: Preserving Openness in a Competitive World, Brochure. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press.

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Steinberg, L. 1996. Beyond the Classroom: Why School Reform Has failed and What Parents Need to Do. New York: Simon and Schuster. STEP (Board on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy, National Research Council). 1999. Securing America's Industrial Strength. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press. Task Force on Alternative Futures for the Department of Energy National Laboratories. 1995. Alternative Futures for the Department of Energy National Laboratories. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office. U.S. House of Representatives, Committee on Science. 1998. Unlocking Our Future: Toward a New National Science Policy. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Congress. Wulf, W. A. 1998. The education challenge. Speech before the National Forum on Harnessing Science and Technology for America's Economic Future, Washington, D.C., February 2-3.

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