Appendix C Workshop Agenda Workshop on Distributed Geolibraries: Spatial Information Resources

Mapping Science Committee

National Research Council - National Academy of Sciences

Room Green 130, 2001 Wisconsin Avenue, NW

Washington, D.C.

The workshop is intended to address the following:

  • Development of a vision for geospatial data dissemination and access in 2010.
  • Comparison of current efforts in digital library research, clearinghouse development, and other data distribution and search activities.
  • Suggestion of short-term and long-term research and development needed to achieve the vision.
  • Identification of the policy and institutional issues, particularly for convergence of efforts to realize the vision.

Monday, June 15, 1998

8:00

Registration, Coffee, Continental Breakfast

Plenary

8:30

INTRODUCTION AND PURPOSE

Mike Goodchild, Workshop Chair, University of California, Santa Barbara



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Appendix C Workshop Agenda Workshop on Distributed Geolibraries: Spatial Information Resources Mapping Science Committee National Research Council - National Academy of Sciences Room Green 130, 2001 Wisconsin Avenue, NW Washington, D.C. The workshop is intended to address the following: Development of a vision for geospatial data dissemination and access in 2010. Comparison of current efforts in digital library research, clearinghouse development, and other data distribution and search activities. Suggestion of short-term and long-term research and development needed to achieve the vision. Identification of the policy and institutional issues, particularly for convergence of efforts to realize the vision. Monday, June 15, 1998 8:00 Registration, Coffee, Continental Breakfast Plenary 8:30 INTRODUCTION AND PURPOSE Mike Goodchild, Workshop Chair, University of California, Santa Barbara

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9:00    FRAME OF REFERENCE—Digital Libraries, Internet, Information Sciences •  Robert Kahn, President, Corporation for National Research Initiatives •  Michael Lesk, Division Director, Information and Intelligent Systems, National Science Foundation 10:20    BREAK 10:40    POLICY-INSTITUTIONAL-EDUCATIONAL •  Eric Miller, Online Computer Library Center, Inc. •  Harlan J. Onsrud, Department of Spatial Information Science and Engineering, University of Maine 12:00    LUNCH 1:00    Breakout Sessions Each group will discuss the following questions: 1.  What is a suitable vision for geospatial data dissemination and access in 2010 (code named geolibraries)? What is a geolibrary? What types of information might a geolibrary contain? What services might it offer? What types of users would there be? What kinds of access restrictions might be needed? Should a geolibrary be integrated with other information services? 2.  Policy and institutional issues What are the legal, ethical, and political issues involved in creating geolibraries? For example, what problems could geolibraries raise related to intellectual property rights? How might such issues affect the technical development of geolibraries? Who should pay for the creation and maintenance of geolibraries? What components might be "free" (funded by the public sector or by the private sector as loss leaders)? What institutional structures would be needed for geolibraries? What organizations might take a lead in their development?

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What are the cognitive problems associated with using geolibraries? Is it possible to construct a geolibrary that is useful to a child in grade 3, for example? What protocols would users need to master, and what problems would occur in using geolibraries across cultural or linguistic barriers? What are the implications of a national-level distributed geolibrary on education? What are the prospects for international geolibraries? 4:00  Plenary Rapporteurs will present results of each breakout group. 5:00  ADJOURN 5:30  RECEPTION; Followed by Dinner at 6:30 Tuesday, June 16, 1998 8:00  Coffee, Continental Breakfast Plenary 8:30  CURRENT ACTIVITIES AND TECHNICAL ISSUES •  Ben Shneiderman, Department of Computer Science, University of Maryland •  Thomas Kalil, Senior Director, National Economic Council, The White House •  Terence Smith, Director, Alexandria Project, University of California, Santa Barbara 10:20  BREAK 10:30  Breakouts Each group will discuss the following questions: 3.  Ongoing Activities What components of existing efforts in digital library research, clearinghouse development, and other data distribution

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and search activities might form a part of a distributed geolibrary system? KDI? Digital Earth? Do the necessary data sets to support geolibraries exist? What initiatives are needed to develop or compile them? How could the geolibraries concept be expanded beyond the national level to take advantage of international and global information resources? 4.   Technical Issues and R&D Needs Integration of geospatial data across themes and scales. A new generation of search engines Geospatial interoperability User interface metaphors Collection-level metadata Which of the R&D needs can be attained in the next few years, and which ones may take 5 to 10 years? 12:00 LUNCH 1:30 Plenary Results of the research needs and current activities to realize a "geolibrary" vision Overall Workshop Results 4:30 Adjourn