Appendix E Biographical Sketches of Panel Members

Michael F. Goodchild (Chair) is professor and chair of the Department of Geography at the University of California, Santa Barbara; director of the National Center for Geographic Information and Analysis; and associate director of the Alexandria Digital Library. He received his B.A. in physics from Cambridge University and Ph.D. in geography from McMaster University. Dr. Goodchild taught at the University of Western Ontario for 19 years before moving to his present position in 1988. His research interests focus on the generic issues of geographic information, including accuracy and the modeling of uncertainty, design of spatial decision support systems, development of methods of spatial analysis, and data structures for global geographic information systems. His publications include the two volume text entitled Geographical Information Systems. Principles, Techniques, Applications and Management (1999, Wiley). He is also chair of the Mapping Science Committee.

Prudence S. Adler is assistant executive director of the Association of Research Libraries (Washington, D.C.), where she is primarily responsible for federal relations and information policy activities. Much of her recent emphasis has been on intellectual property rights in an electronic environment.

Barbara P. Buttenfield is associate professor of geography at the University of Colorado in Boulder. She holds a Ph.D. in geography from the University of Washington. She has served on the faculty at the State University of New York, Buffalo; the University of California, Santa Barbara; and the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Dr. Buttenfield's research interests focus on cartographic knowledge construction, spatial data delivery on the Internet, and visualization tools for geographic modeling. A current project to evaluate user



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 117
Appendix E Biographical Sketches of Panel Members Michael F. Goodchild (Chair) is professor and chair of the Department of Geography at the University of California, Santa Barbara; director of the National Center for Geographic Information and Analysis; and associate director of the Alexandria Digital Library. He received his B.A. in physics from Cambridge University and Ph.D. in geography from McMaster University. Dr. Goodchild taught at the University of Western Ontario for 19 years before moving to his present position in 1988. His research interests focus on the generic issues of geographic information, including accuracy and the modeling of uncertainty, design of spatial decision support systems, development of methods of spatial analysis, and data structures for global geographic information systems. His publications include the two volume text entitled Geographical Information Systems. Principles, Techniques, Applications and Management (1999, Wiley). He is also chair of the Mapping Science Committee. Prudence S. Adler is assistant executive director of the Association of Research Libraries (Washington, D.C.), where she is primarily responsible for federal relations and information policy activities. Much of her recent emphasis has been on intellectual property rights in an electronic environment. Barbara P. Buttenfield is associate professor of geography at the University of Colorado in Boulder. She holds a Ph.D. in geography from the University of Washington. She has served on the faculty at the State University of New York, Buffalo; the University of California, Santa Barbara; and the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Dr. Buttenfield's research interests focus on cartographic knowledge construction, spatial data delivery on the Internet, and visualization tools for geographic modeling. A current project to evaluate user

OCR for page 117
interface tools for the Alexandria Digital Library is funded jointly by NSF, ARPA, and NASA. She is past President of the American Cartographic Association, and serves on the editorial boards of Computers Environment and Urban Systems, Transactions on GIS, and Cartographic Perspectives. She is also a member of the Mapping Science Committee. Robert E. Kahn is chairman, CEO, and president of the Corporation for National Research Initiatives (CNRI), which he founded in 1986 after a 13 years at the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). CNRI provides leadership and funding for research and development of the National Information Infrastructure. Dr. Kahn earned a Ph.D. degree from Princeton in 1964. He worked at Bell Laboratories and as an assistant professor of electrical engineering at MIT. He took a leave of absence from MIT to join Bolt Beranek and Newman, where he was responsible for the system design of the Arpanet. In 1972 he moved to DARPA and subsequently became director of DARPA's Information Processing Techniques Office (IPTO). While director of IPTO he initiated the United States government's billion-dollar Strategic Computing Program, the largest computer research and development program ever undertaken. Dr. Kahn conceived the idea of open-architecture networking. He is a coinventor of the TCP/IP protocols and was responsible for originating DARPA's Internet program. Dr. Kahn also coined the term national information infrastructure (NII) in the mid-1980s, which later became more widely known as the information superhighway. His recent work has been developing the concept of a digital object infrastructure to provide a framework for interoperability of heterogeneous information systems, particularly as applied to digital libraries. Dr. Kahn is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a 1997 recipient of the National Medal of Technology. Annette J. Krygiel is with the Institute for National Strategic Studies, National Defense University, Ft. Lesley J. McNair, in Washington, D.C. Dr. Krygiel has a B.S. in mathematics from St. Louis University, and a M.S. and Ph.D. in computer science from

OCR for page 117
Washington University, St. Louis. In her doctoral research she developed modeling techniques for parallel computing architectures. She began her government career in 1963, serving with the Defense Mapping Agency (DMA) until July 1994. While at DMA her areas of endeavor included software development, software engineering, management of research initiatives in computer science and telecommunications, and program management of large-scale systems. Dr. Krygiel rejoined DMA's special program office to manage the program integration, test and delivery phases of DMA's Digital Production System, one of the U.S. Department of Defense's (DOD) largest software developments. Subsequently, Dr. Krygiel served as DMA's chief scientist until her formal appointment by the Secretary of Defense as the Director of the Central Imagery Office (CIO), a DOD combat support agency. She remained as Director for twenty-seven months until that agency merged into the National Imagery and Mapping Agency in October 1996. She was awarded the National Intelligence Distinguished Service Medal while CIO Director. Dr. Krygiel was subsequently appointed to the Institute for National Strategic Studies at the National Defense University, where she is investigating the problem of large-scale system integration. Harlan J. Onsrud is associate professor in the Department of Spatial Information Science and Engineering at the University of Maine and chair of the Scientific Policy Committee of the National Center for Geographic Information and Analysis. He received B.S. and M.S. degrees in Civil Engineering from the University of Wisconsin and a Juris Doctorate from the University of Wisconsin Law School. His research focuses on (1) analysis of legal and institutional issues affecting the creation and use of digital databases and the sharing of geographic information, (2) assessing utilization of GIS and the social impacts of the technology, and (3) developing and assessing strategies for supporting the diffusion of geographic information innovations. He is also a member of the Mapping Science Committee.