Appendix A
Biographical Information on the Committee on Ozone-Forming Potential of Reformulated Gasoline

William L. Chameides is Regents Professor of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at the Georgia Institute of Technology. His research interests include atmospheric chemistry, tropospheric gas-phase and aqueous-phase chemistry; air pollution; global chemical cycles; biospheric-atmospheric interaction; and global and regional environmental change. His NRC service includes being the chair of the Committee on Atmospheric Chemistry and a member of the committee on Tropospheric Ozone Formation and Measurement. Dr. Chameides has a B.A. degree from SUNY Binghamton, and an M.Ph. and a Ph.D. in geology and geophysics from Yale University. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences.

Charles A. Amann is head of KAB Engineering. Previously, he was a research fellow with General Motors Research Laboratories. Mr. Amann's research interests include fuels and combustion; internal combustion engines; and energy technologies. He received a B.S. and M.S. in mechanical engineering from the University of Minnesota. Mr. Amann is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and has served on many committees of the National Research Council.

Roger Atkinson is a research chemist at the University of California at



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--> Appendix A Biographical Information on the Committee on Ozone-Forming Potential of Reformulated Gasoline William L. Chameides is Regents Professor of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at the Georgia Institute of Technology. His research interests include atmospheric chemistry, tropospheric gas-phase and aqueous-phase chemistry; air pollution; global chemical cycles; biospheric-atmospheric interaction; and global and regional environmental change. His NRC service includes being the chair of the Committee on Atmospheric Chemistry and a member of the committee on Tropospheric Ozone Formation and Measurement. Dr. Chameides has a B.A. degree from SUNY Binghamton, and an M.Ph. and a Ph.D. in geology and geophysics from Yale University. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. Charles A. Amann is head of KAB Engineering. Previously, he was a research fellow with General Motors Research Laboratories. Mr. Amann's research interests include fuels and combustion; internal combustion engines; and energy technologies. He received a B.S. and M.S. in mechanical engineering from the University of Minnesota. Mr. Amann is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and has served on many committees of the National Research Council. Roger Atkinson is a research chemist at the University of California at

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--> Riverside. His research areas include kinetics and mechanisms of the gas phase of the atmospherically important reactions of organic compounds. Dr. Atkinson received a B.A. in natural sciences and a Ph.D. in physical chemistry from Cambridge University. He currently serves as a member of the California Air Resources Board's Reactivity Scientific Advisory Committee. He has also served as a member of the NRC committee on Tropospheric Ozone Formation and Measurement. Nancy J. Brown is a senior scientist at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. She is also head of the Environmental Research Program within the Energy and Environment Division, and leader of the Combustion Research Group. Dr. Brown's research areas include combustion chemistry, chemical dynamics, modeling combustion processes, and model sensitivity and uncertainty in atmospheric chemistry. She received a B.S. from Virginia Polytechnic Institute, and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in chemical physics from the University of Maryland. Jack G. Calvert is a senior scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research. His research areas include atmospheric chemistry, photochemistry, reaction kinetics, and formation and decay mechanisms of reactive transients (molecules and free radicals). Dr. Calvert has served on many NRC committees and currently serves on the California Air Resources Board's Reactivity Scientific Advisory Committee. He received a B.S. and Ph.D. in chemistry from UCLA. Fred C. Fehsenfeld is senior scientist and program leader for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Aeronomy Laboratory. His research areas include atmospheric measurement of ozone and precursors. Dr. Fehsenfeld received a B.A. from Rice University and a Ph.D. in physics from the University of Texas. He served as a member of the NRC Committee on Tropospheric Ozone Formation and Measurement and a member of the NRC Committee on Atmospheric Chemistry. John P. Longwell is a professor emeritus in the Department of Chemical Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Previously, Dr. Longwell conducted research at Exxon Corporation on petroleum and petrochemicals and directed its Central Basic Research Laboratory. Dr. Longwell's relevant research interests are in fuels and petrochemicals,

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--> petroleum refining, environmental control, and fuel combustion. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and has served on many NRC committees. He received a B.S. from the University of California at Berkeley and a Sc.D. in chemical engineering at MIT. Mario J. Molina is a professor of atmospheric chemistry in the Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His main research interests are in chemistry of the stratosphere. He was co-discoverer of the theory that chloro-fluorocarbon gases deplete the ozone layer of the stratosphere. Dr. Molina is a Nobel Laureate and a member of the National Academy of Sciences. He received a B.S. from the University of National Autonoma De Mexico and a Ph.D. in physical chemistry from the University of California at Berkeley. S. Trivikrama Rao is assistant commissioner for the Office of Science and Technology of the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation. He is also a research professor of atmospheric science in the Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences and professor of environmental statistics in the Department of Biometry and Statistics at the State University of New York (SUNY) at Albany. Dr. Rao's research areas include automobile pollution dispersion; atmospheric turbulence and air pollution meteorology; modeling of photochemical oxidants; and analysis and interpretation of environmental data. He received a B.Sc. from Andhra Loyola College in India, a M.Sc. (tech.) from Andhra University in India, and a Ph.D. in atmospheric science at SUNY Albany. He currently serves on the editorial board for the Atmospheric Environment Journal. Also, he is co-chair of the Modeling and Chemistry team of the North American Research Strategy for Tropospheric Ozone (NARSTO). Armistead G. Russell is a professor of environmental engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology. His research areas include air-pollution control, aerosol dynamics, atmospheric chemistry, combustion research, control-strategy design, computer modeling, and multiphase fluid dynamics. He received a B.S. from Washington State University and an M.S. and Ph.D. in mechanical engineering at the California Institute of Technology. Dr. Russell was a member of the NRC Committee of Tropospheric Ozone Formation and Measurement. He currently

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--> serves as a member of the California Air Resources Board's Reactivity Scientific Advisory Committee. Christopher L. Saricks is a transportation systems analyst in the Center for Transportation Research in the Energy Systems Division of the Argonne National Laboratory. He received a B.A. from the University of Kansas and an M.Phil. at the University of London. Mr. Saricks' professional activities include mobile-source emission estimates. He currently serves on an NRC review panel for the National Cooperative Highway Research Program.

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