Appendix C

Task Group Biographies

Eugene N. Parker (chair) is professor emeritus in the departments of physics and astronomy at the Enrico Fermi Institute at the University of Chicago. His research interests include theoretical plasma physics, magnetohydrodynamics, solar and terrestrial physics, base physics of the active Sun, application and extension of classical physics to the active conditions found in the astronomical universe (e.g., the stellar x-ray corona), and the solar wind and the origin of stellar and galactic magnetic fields. Dr. Parker received his B.S. from Michigan State University (1948) and his Ph.D. from the California Institute of Technology (1951).

Karen L. Harvey is the president of Solar Physics Research Corporation, Tucson, Arizona, and index editor for Solar Physics Journal. Her current research involves collaborative studies with the Yohkoh/soft x-ray telescope of x-ray bright points and their association with magnetic fields and chromospheric counterparts. Dr. Harvey has served on numerous working groups, panels and advisory groups, including the 1980 working group on short-term prediction of solar activity for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration on international workshop solar-terrestrial predictions and the 1986-1988 National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) working group on predictions of solar activity and the atmospheric response during solar cycle 22. She was a member of the NASA science group to develop science objectives or source: the solar ultraviolet radiation and correlative emissions mission, 1996-1997; leader of solers22 working group on total, near-ultraviolet, visible, and infrared spectral irradiance, 1996-present; and the NASA working group to predict solar activity for solar cycle 23, 1997-1998.

Gordon J. Hurford is a senior scientist at the California Institute of Technology, where he is involved in research activities primarily involving the development and use of observational techniques such as microwave interferometry and spectroscopy and high-resolution hard x-ray imaging for studying the solar atmosphere and high-energy processes in solar flares. Dr. Hurford was a consultant for the NASA hard x-ray imaging facility definition team, 1975-1979; a member of NASA Pinhole/Occulter Facility science working group, 1980-1988 and the NASA high-energy solar physics science working group, 1990-1994; and co-investigator (optical design, analysis software) on HEIDI, a balloon-borne experiment for high-resolution hard x-ray/gamma ray imaging, 1990-1994. He is a member of the American Astronomical Society and has produced over 80 publications since 1973.

Judith A. Lean is a research physicist in the Space Science Division of the Naval Research Laboratory. Her interest focuses on studies of the mechanisms and measurements of variations in the Sun's radiative output at all wavelengths, and the effects of this variability on Earth's global climate and space weather, with the goal of understanding how changes in our environment that occur as a result of natural phenomena may be masking or exacerbating human effects on the Earth system, such as caused by increasing greenhouse gases and ozone depletion. Dr. Lean received her B.S. from the Australian National University (1974) and a Ph.D. in atmospheric physics from the University of Adelaide, Australia (1980).



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GROUND-BASED SOLAR RESEARCH: AN ASSESSMENT AND STRATEGY FOR THE FUTURE Appendix C Task Group Biographies Eugene N. Parker (chair) is professor emeritus in the departments of physics and astronomy at the Enrico Fermi Institute at the University of Chicago. His research interests include theoretical plasma physics, magnetohydrodynamics, solar and terrestrial physics, base physics of the active Sun, application and extension of classical physics to the active conditions found in the astronomical universe (e.g., the stellar x-ray corona), and the solar wind and the origin of stellar and galactic magnetic fields. Dr. Parker received his B.S. from Michigan State University (1948) and his Ph.D. from the California Institute of Technology (1951). Karen L. Harvey is the president of Solar Physics Research Corporation, Tucson, Arizona, and index editor for Solar Physics Journal. Her current research involves collaborative studies with the Yohkoh/soft x-ray telescope of x-ray bright points and their association with magnetic fields and chromospheric counterparts. Dr. Harvey has served on numerous working groups, panels and advisory groups, including the 1980 working group on short-term prediction of solar activity for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration on international workshop solar-terrestrial predictions and the 1986-1988 National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) working group on predictions of solar activity and the atmospheric response during solar cycle 22. She was a member of the NASA science group to develop science objectives or source: the solar ultraviolet radiation and correlative emissions mission, 1996-1997; leader of solers22 working group on total, near-ultraviolet, visible, and infrared spectral irradiance, 1996-present; and the NASA working group to predict solar activity for solar cycle 23, 1997-1998. Gordon J. Hurford is a senior scientist at the California Institute of Technology, where he is involved in research activities primarily involving the development and use of observational techniques such as microwave interferometry and spectroscopy and high-resolution hard x-ray imaging for studying the solar atmosphere and high-energy processes in solar flares. Dr. Hurford was a consultant for the NASA hard x-ray imaging facility definition team, 1975-1979; a member of NASA Pinhole/Occulter Facility science working group, 1980-1988 and the NASA high-energy solar physics science working group, 1990-1994; and co-investigator (optical design, analysis software) on HEIDI, a balloon-borne experiment for high-resolution hard x-ray/gamma ray imaging, 1990-1994. He is a member of the American Astronomical Society and has produced over 80 publications since 1973. Judith A. Lean is a research physicist in the Space Science Division of the Naval Research Laboratory. Her interest focuses on studies of the mechanisms and measurements of variations in the Sun's radiative output at all wavelengths, and the effects of this variability on Earth's global climate and space weather, with the goal of understanding how changes in our environment that occur as a result of natural phenomena may be masking or exacerbating human effects on the Earth system, such as caused by increasing greenhouse gases and ozone depletion. Dr. Lean received her B.S. from the Australian National University (1974) and a Ph.D. in atmospheric physics from the University of Adelaide, Australia (1980).

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GROUND-BASED SOLAR RESEARCH: AN ASSESSMENT AND STRATEGY FOR THE FUTURE Richard A. McCray is the George Gamow Distinguished Professor of astrophysical and planetary sciences. Dr. McCray was awarded a Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship, and in 1990 he received the Dannie S. Heinemann prize for astrophysics from the American Physical Society. In 1989, he was elected to the National Academy of Sciences. In 1996, he was appointed concurrent professor of astronomy at Nanjing University. Dr. McCray's research is on the theory of the dynamics of the interstellar gas, theory of cosmic x-ray sources, and, most recently, the theory of supernova 1987a. Dr. McCray is also engaged in observations of these phenomena with various spacecraft, including the Hubble Space Telescope. From 1993 to 1996, he served on the NRC's Committee on Astronomy and Astrophysics (CAA). From 1994 to 1995, he chaired the CAA's Panel on Ground-based Optical and Infrared Astronomy. Currently, he is a member of the Mathematical and Physical Science Advisory Committee for the National Science Foundation. Ronald L. Moore is an internationally recognized solar scientist. He received his Ph.D. from Stanford University in 1972 and was a Research Fellow with the Caltech Solar Astronomy Group (1972-1980). He joined the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center solar physics branch in 1981, where he developed and continues to lead a research program on observed solar magnetic fields and their effects in the solar atmosphere. Dr. Moore has published over 100 solar research papers and articles in refereed journals, conference proceedings, books, and encyclopedias. Robert Rosner has been a professor of theoretical astrophysics in the departments of astronomy and astrophysics at the Enrico Fermi Institute at the University of Chicago since 1987. Most of his work is in the general field of astrophysical fluid dynamics and plasma astrophysics, focusing on theories of stellar magnetic activity, models for stellar x-ray emission from early and late-type stars, models for stellar interiors and stellar evolution, turbulent plasma heating and transport processes, models for galactic transient x-ray sources, and magnetohydrodynamic processes in accretion disks and jets, and models for galactic and cluster halos. He has also published on the application of stochastic differential equations to astrophysical problems, on optimization and inverse methods in astrophysics, and on computational and analytical studies of laboratory fluid dynamics experiments ranging from thermal convection at high rayleigh number to doubly diffusive convection. Dr. Rosner is a former member of the NRC's Committee on Astronomy and Astrophysics. Philip H. Scherrer is a research professor in the Department of Physics and Center for Space Science and Astrophysics at Stanford University, where he leads the solar oscillation investigation-Michelson Doppler Imager (SOI-MDI) project begun in 1988. His team designed and constructed MDI, which is a solar telescope on the SOHO spacecraft that measures velocity patterns on the surface of the Sun. Dr. Scherrer's group also operates the Wilcox Solar Observatory at Stanford University. Topics of interest include the solar cycle, the large-scale structure and evolution of the solar magnetic field, the varying influence of the Sun's magnetic field on the solar wind and the earth, and solar rotation. He is a former member of the NRC's Committee on Solar-Terrestrial Research (1987-1990). Carolus J. Schrijver is currently a physicist/specialist at the Lockheed Martin Palo Alto Advanced Technology Center. His present duties include data analysis of SOHO'S MDI and of the Transitional Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) mission, and the scientific coordination

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GROUND-BASED SOLAR RESEARCH: AN ASSESSMENT AND STRATEGY FOR THE FUTURE of TRACE. His primary research themes are the dispersal of the photospheric magnetic field, relationships between nonradiative heating in different domains of stellar outer atmospheres, x-ray spectroscopy, and acoustic heating of stellar chromospheres. From August through October 1987, he was visiting scientist at Sacramento Peak Observatory, New Mexico, and from April through July 1987, visiting scientist at Lockheed Palo Alto Research Laboratory. He was a research fellow with the European Space Agency, Estec, Noordwijk, The Netherlands (1989-1991) and a fellow of The Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences at the Astronomical Institute of the University of Utrecht, The Netherlands (1991-1994). He has published numerous papers in the refereed literature, as well as invited reviews, contributed papers in conference proceedings, and popular science papers. Peter A. Sturrock is professor of space science and astrophysics in the Applied Physics Department and director of the Center for Space Science and Astrophysics at Stanford University. His research interests have included electron physics, particle accelerators, plasma physics, solar physics, astrophysics, and scientific inference. He has served as chairman of the Plasma Physics Division of the American Astronomical Society and also as chairman of the Solar Physics Division of the American Astronomical Society, and he currently serves as president of the Society for Scientific Exploration. He has received the annual prize of the Gravity Foundation (1967), the Hale Prize of the American Astronomical Society (1986), the Arctowski Medal of the National Academy of Sciences (1990), and the Space Science Award of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (1992). Alan M. Title is a consulting physicist at the Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center and a consulting professor of physics at Stanford University. He is co-director of the Stanford-Lockheed Institute for Space Research. His primary research areas are solar magnetic and velocity fields; optical interferometers, in particular ultra-narrow optical filters; high-resolution observations using active and adaptive optical systems; and data analysis systems for image analysis. He also develops ground-and space-based instruments for solar physics research. Dr. Title acted as principal investigator of CIP on SOT/HRSO/OSL and of SOUP on Spacelab 2 investigations. He also acted as principal scientist for the Skylab H-alpha telescope experiment and project scientist on the MDI program. Dr. Title is the principal investigator of TRACE, a recently launched mission that observes the Sun to study the connections between the solar surface and the corona. He is a member of numerous national and international scientific advisory boards including NASA 's solar physics management operations working group, the science definition team of the Solar Terrestrial Relation Observatory, and the science definition team of the High Resolution X-Ray Explorer. Dr. Title received a Ph.D. in physics from the California Institute of Technology.

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