Appendix B
Biographies of Panelists and Facilitators

Panelists

Jane Smith Patterson is the Senior Advisor for Science and Technology and Director of the Office for Technology in the administration of Governor James B. Hunt, Jr. of North Carolina. During Governor Hunt's first two terms, Ms. Patterson served as Secretary of Administration. Over the next six years, she worked in private industry as a Vice President of ITT Network Systems Group, of ITT Alcatel and Alcatel, NA. She was recruited by University of North Carolina, Wilmington to serve as Interim Vice Chancellor, where she oversaw reorganization and creation of a new Vice Chancellorship for Extended Education and Public Service. In 1993, Governor Hunt appointed her to serve as his Chief Advisor for Policy, Budget and Technology. Ms. Patterson's career has concentrated on the areas of information technology infrastructure and its impact on the operations of government, industry, and education. She has consulted with more than 20 countries worldwide and 38 states relating to the design and execution of information networks. She has been the major visionary and leader in the development and implementation of the North Carolina Information Highway. Ms. Smith Patterson was a 1996 National Information Infrastructure Awards finalist and winner of the Federal Government Computing Council's Open Systems Interoperability Award in 1997.

William A. Wulf is President of the National Academy of Engineering and Vice Chair of the National Research Council, the principal operating arm of the National Academies of Sciences and Engineering. He is on leave from the University of Virginia, Charlottesville, where he is AT&T Professor of Engineering and Applied Sciences. Among his activities at the University are a complete revision of the undergraduate computer science curriculum, research on computer architecture and computer security, and an effort to assist research scholars in exploitation of information technology. Dr. Wulf has had a distinguished professional career which includes serving as Assistant Director of the National Science Foundation; Chair and Chief Executive Officer of Tartan Laboratories, Inc., Pitts-



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--> Appendix B Biographies of Panelists and Facilitators Panelists Jane Smith Patterson is the Senior Advisor for Science and Technology and Director of the Office for Technology in the administration of Governor James B. Hunt, Jr. of North Carolina. During Governor Hunt's first two terms, Ms. Patterson served as Secretary of Administration. Over the next six years, she worked in private industry as a Vice President of ITT Network Systems Group, of ITT Alcatel and Alcatel, NA. She was recruited by University of North Carolina, Wilmington to serve as Interim Vice Chancellor, where she oversaw reorganization and creation of a new Vice Chancellorship for Extended Education and Public Service. In 1993, Governor Hunt appointed her to serve as his Chief Advisor for Policy, Budget and Technology. Ms. Patterson's career has concentrated on the areas of information technology infrastructure and its impact on the operations of government, industry, and education. She has consulted with more than 20 countries worldwide and 38 states relating to the design and execution of information networks. She has been the major visionary and leader in the development and implementation of the North Carolina Information Highway. Ms. Smith Patterson was a 1996 National Information Infrastructure Awards finalist and winner of the Federal Government Computing Council's Open Systems Interoperability Award in 1997. William A. Wulf is President of the National Academy of Engineering and Vice Chair of the National Research Council, the principal operating arm of the National Academies of Sciences and Engineering. He is on leave from the University of Virginia, Charlottesville, where he is AT&T Professor of Engineering and Applied Sciences. Among his activities at the University are a complete revision of the undergraduate computer science curriculum, research on computer architecture and computer security, and an effort to assist research scholars in exploitation of information technology. Dr. Wulf has had a distinguished professional career which includes serving as Assistant Director of the National Science Foundation; Chair and Chief Executive Officer of Tartan Laboratories, Inc., Pitts-

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--> burgh; and Professor of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh. He is the author of more than 80 papers and technical reports. He has written three books and holds one U.S. patent. James D. Myers is Senior Research Scientist and Collaboratory Project Leader in the Computing and Information Sciences Department at the Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory (EMSL), a division of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). He is principal investigator on the DOE 2000 Collaboratory and internally funded projects to design, develop, deploy, and understand the use of scientific collaboratories. Dr. Myers has experience in object-oriented software design, distributed computing, network and World Wide Web communications, collaborative groupware systems, scientific visualization, and hardware interfacing, and is one of the developers of the EMSL real-time collaboration, electronic notebook, and NMR Virtual Facility software. His team is now deploying this software to allow external researchers to run experiments on the EMSL's instruments remotely (and securely) and participate fully in all data acquisition and analysis tasks without requiring a visit to the laboratory. Dr. Myers is also developing the concept of a collaboratory for undergraduate research and education with Dr. Norman Chonacky of Evergreen State College and collaborators at PNNL and 7 northwest academic institutions. He is a 1996–97 Associated Western Universities Distinguished Lecturer and was nominated for a 1997 Presidential Young Investigator award. He received his Ph.D. in physical chemistry from the University of California, Berkeley. Mary Anne Scott is Program Manager in the Office of Computational and Technology Research, Division of Energy Research at the Department of Energy. Over the past three years she has been responsible for a program that is developing technologies that enhance ability of scientists to work collaboratively, improve the ease with which they are able to model complex scientific problems, and provide remote access to experimental facilities and other DOE resources. This program is producing Advanced Computing Software and Collaboratory Tools which are being used in Scientific Application Pilots and Collaboratory Pilots—they are also being made available to the general scientific community. Under the Next Generation Internet Initiative activities within DOE, she has program responsibilities for applications. These are revolutionary applications that require high bandwidth and services not available in today's Internet and that will be used to demonstrate the integration of advanced networking with the application technologies. Ralph L. Scott is Assistant Manager for the Department of Energy's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI). He has also worked as a scientist and manager of environment, safety, and health, and fossil fuel technology commercialization programs. He has advanced degrees and has also received numerous awards for academic as well as professional achievement. Some of his current

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--> major activities include: Bringing Electronic Journals to the Desktop; History of Human Radiation Experimentation; and Declassification Review. Previously, he served as OSTI's Assistant Manager for Technology Systems Management where he was responsible for all computing, telecommunication, software, printing, publishing, and microfiche operations. S. Yona Ettinger is currently the Executive Director of the U.S.-Israel Binational Science Foundation (BSF). Between 1992 and 1996, Dr. Ettinger was the Minister-Counselor for Science and Technology at the Embassy of Israel in Washington, D.C. Prior to his appointment to that position, he served as the Director General of the Israeli Atomic Energy Commission from 1987 to 1992. From 1981 to 1986, Dr. Ettinger was the Head of the Physics Division at Rafael A.D.A. in Haifa, Israel, where he also served as Chief Engineer from 1960 to 1975. From 1975 to 1979, he held the position of Director General at the Soreq Nuclear Research Center at Yavneh. He has sat on several international delegations including the Israel-Jordan Bilateral Negotiations on Water, Energy and the Environment and the U.S.-Israel-Jordan Joint Expert Group on Cooperative Research in Science, Technology and Education. Dr. Ettinger has received several awards and has published in scientific and engineering journals. John W. Jost is Executive Director of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC), an international, scientific, non-governmental objective body that addresses global issues involving the chemical sciences. IUPAC's international secretariat is located in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, recently relocated from Oxford, England. Dr. Jost was previously with Unocal, a large international oil company, where he served as Senior Vice President for Administration, President of Unocal Process Technology and Licensing, and Vice President of the Fred L. Hartley Research Center. He received Bachelors and Masters degrees in chemistry from Columbia University, obtained his Ph.D. in physical chemistry from the State University of New York in Stony Brook in 1971, and performed postdoctoral research at the University of California, Berkeley. Facilitators Marye Anne Fox is Chancellor of the North Carolina State University. Previously she served as Vice President for Research and the M. June and J. Virgil Waggoner Regents Chair in Chemistry at the University of Texas at Austin. Her most recent research activities include organic photochemistry, electrochemistry, and physical organic mechanisms. She is a former Associate Editor of the Journal of the American Chemical Society. She was also the Director for the Center for Fast Kinetics Research, Vice Chairman of the National Science Board, and a member of the Task Force on Alternative Futures for the Department of Energy National Laboratories, Galvin Committee. Dr. Fox is a member of the National Academy

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--> of Sciences and serves on several NAS committees, including the NAS Council Executive Committee and the Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy. She is an NAS Councilor, a former member of the Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Applications, and has served on the Committee on Criteria for Federal Support of Research and Development. She received a Ph.D. in organic chemistry from Dartmouth College. Johannes M. Boehme has a broad educational and professional background that has provided him with expertise not only in the medical specialty of radiology but also in business and computer applications related to the field. Dr. Boehme is currently an Associate Professor of Radiology (Computer Science), the Associate Director for Administration in the Division of Radiological Sciences, and the Associate Dean for Academic Computing and Information Science at Wake Forest University School of Medicine. Dr. Boehme is also an adjunct Professor of Business at the Babcock Graduate School of Management at Wake Forest University. At the state and national level, Dr. Boehme was a co-investigator on the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) grant, a member of the Technical Advisory Committee for the TeleQuest Teleradiology System, and a board member for the North Carolina GigaNet Initiative and Internet 2 Projects. He is co-author of 20 books chapters, more than 17 journal articles, and a dozen abstracts and pamphlets. His research interests include the design, coordination, and implementation of clinical computer operations, with particular emphasis on integration strategies for computerized patient management information, including hospital information systems, radiology information systems, and picture archiving and communications systems. William H. Glaze is Director of the Carolina Environmental Program and Professor at the University of North Carolina School of Public Health. Until 1997, Dr. Glaze was Chair of the Department of Environmental Science and Engineering at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Previously, Dr. Glaze was Director of the Environmental Science and Engineering Program at University of California, Los Angeles and has also served on the faculty of the University of Texas at Dallas and the University of North Texas. He has served as a member of the Science Committee of the Environmental Management Advisory Board for the U.S. Department of Energy; Environmental Engineering Committee and Drinking Water Subcommittee; the Division Review Committee of the Chemical Science and Technology Division of Los Alamos National Laboratory; and has served as former Chairman of the Committee on Water Treatment Chemicals at the National Research Council, National Academy of Sciences. Dr. Glaze is currently a Consultant to the Executive Committee of the U.S. EPA Advisory Board and a member of the American Chemical Society Task Force on Environmental Research.

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--> John C. Toole is Deputy Director at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Mr. Toole joined the NCSA senior management team in August 1997 and oversees the technical operation and coordination of National Computational Science Alliance teams throughout the United States. Before coming to NCSA, Mr. Toole was Director of the National Coordination Office (NCO) for Computing, Information, and Communications and Chair of the Computing, Information, and Communications R&D Subcommittee of the Committee on Computing, Information, and Communications (CCIC) of the National Science and Technology Council. Mr. Toole retired from the U.S. Air Force in 1994 after more than 22 years of service. Prior to being selected as Director of the NCO, he spent 10 years with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, serving as Program Manager, Deputy Office Director, and Acting Office Director of Research in Computing Systems and Technology. The National Center for Supercomputing Applications is the leading-edge site for the National Computational Science Alliance. The Alliance partnership is funded by the National Science Foundation to advance computational infrastructure for the 21st century; it includes more than 50 academic, government and industry research partners from across the United States. Charles E. Putman is Senior Vice President for Research Administration and Policy at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina. He is also the James B. Duke Professor of Radiology and Professor of Medicine at Duke Medical Center. Dr. Putman received his medical degree from the University of Texas, Galveston and completed residency in Radiology at the University of California in San Francisco. In 1973, Dr. Putman was appointed to the faculty of Yale University School of Medicine as Assistant Professor in both radiology and internal medicine. He was made Chief of Chest Radiology the following year and then served as Clinical Director of Diagnostic Radiology. In 1977, he joined the faculty of Duke University medical School as Professor and Chairman in the Department of Radiology. He was appointed Vice Chancellor for Health Affairs, Vice Provost in 1985, and Dean of the School of Medicine the following year. He also served as Executive Vice President of Administration from 1990 to 1995. Dr. Putman was elected to the Institute of Medicine in 1987. He serves on the Executive Committees of the North Carolina Board of Science and Technology, the Research Triangle Foundation, and the Research Triangle Institute. He is Vice Chairman of the North Carolina Biotechnology Center and Chairman of the Board of the Microelectronics Center of North Carolina. Norman L. Christensen, Jr. is Dean of the Nicholas School of Environment and Professor of Ecology at Duke University. He received his B.A. and M.A. in biology from California State University, Fresno and his Ph.D. in biology from University of California, Santa Barbara. Dr. Christensen is interested in the effects of disturbance on the structure and function of populations and communities. His

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--> ongoing studies include an analysis of patterns of forest development following cropland abandonment as they are affected by environment, stand history, and plant demographic patterns. This research focuses on the historical data sets and resources of the Duke Forest. He is also conducting research on the southeastern coastal plain and western Sierra Nevada focused on a comparison of biogeochemical and community responses to varying fire regimes. These studies are aimed at an understanding of the evolutionary and ecosystem consequences of fire and the application of such information in the development of wilderness management and policy protocols. In addition, Dr. Christensen is conducting research on the use of remote sensing systems, such as synthetic aperture radar, to evaluate long-term changes in forest ecosystems.