TABLE 1 Main Child Care Arrangement of Low-Income Children, by Household Type for Children Under Age 5

   

Child Care Provider

       

Family Type

Sample Size

Parent (%)

Relative (%)

In-Home (%)

Family Day Care (%)

Center (%)

Other (%)

Two parents

310

64.1

15.8

1.5

5.5

8.5

4.6

both employed

75

40.2

26.7

0.8

11.0

12.1

9.3

one employed

172

69.2

15.4

2.3

4.3

5.2

3.6

none employed

62

79.0

3.9

0.0

2.3

13.2

1.6

Single mother

366

37.7

25.7

2.4

9.9

20.3

3.8

employed

119

16.9

30.1

1.0

21.0

27.2

3.8

not employed

247

47.8

23.7

3.1

4.6

17.0

3.8

Total

710

47.5

22.2

2.0

7.8

14.7

5.8

Note: The National Child Care Survey 1990 and its low-income supplement, from which this table comes, define low-income families as those with annual incomes below $15,000.

SOURCE: Adapted from Brayfield et al., 1993. Reprinted with permission.

face much more limited child care options than higher-income families. Furthermore, prospects that low-income families' reliance on child care may effectively be mandated by federal and state welfare reform initiatives have raised concerns regarding parents' ability to place their children in care arrangements that they feel assured are safe, nurturing, and supportive of their children's growth and development while they strive to meet work requirements.

What is known about the child care preferences of low-income families? Do they define “good” child care differently from middle- and upper-income families? What influences impinge on the capacity of low-income families to match their preferences with their actual child care arrangements, and do they differ from those that affect other families? Is there evidence that the child care choices of low-income families are constrained? These questions were addressed by several of the presentations at the workshops.



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement