Contents

 

 

Executive Summary

 

1

 1

 

Detection of Substellar-Mass Objects

 

6

   

 Status of Current Indirect Searches,

 

7

   

 Direct Detection of SMOs,

 

9

   

 Search Strategies for Isolated Brown Dwarfs Using Current Ground-Based Facilities, John Stauffer, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics

 

14

   

 Search and Analysis Strategies for Substellar and Planetary Companions by Direct Detection, Roger Angel, Steward Observatory, University of Arizona

 

15

   

 Indirect Detection Techniques Present and Future, Robert W. Noyes, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics

 

16

   

 

 

 2

 

Observational Characterization of Nearby SMOs

 

19

   

 Current State of Observations,

 

19

   

 The Physical and Orbital Characteristics of Known Substellar-Mass Objects, Gibor Basri, University of California, Berkeley

 

21

   

 Ground- and Space-Based Spectroscopy of the Composition of Brown Dwarfs and Extrasolar Planets, Mark S. Marley, New Mexico State University

 

22

   

 Comparative Spectroscopy of Brown Dwarfs and Very Late Main Sequence Stars, Rafael Rebolo, Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias

 

23

   

 Estimating the Role of Brown Dwarfs in Globular Clusters, Ivan King, University of California, Berkeley

 

24

   

 Brown Dwarf Candidates in Star-Forming Regions, Lynne A. Hillenbrand, University of California, Berkeley

 

25

 3

 

Theoretical Models of SMO Structure and Atmosphere

 

27

   

 Current Status of Models,

 

27

 

 

An Historical Perspective on Theoretical Studies of Brown Dwarfs, Peter Hauschildt, University of Georgia

 

30

   

 Model Atmospheres and Synthetic Spectra of Brown Dwarfs, France Allard, Wichita State University

 

30

   

 Interior and Evolutionary Models of Brown Dwarfs, Adam Burrows, University of Arizona

 

31

   

 Theory and Observation of Kinematically Old, Low-Metallicity Objects, Gilles Chabrier, Ecole Normale Superieur de Lyon

 

34



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page R12
Failed Stars and Super Planets: A Report Based on the January 1998 Workshop on Substellar-Mass Objects Contents     Executive Summary   1  1   Detection of Substellar-Mass Objects   6      Status of Current Indirect Searches,   7      Direct Detection of SMOs,   9      Search Strategies for Isolated Brown Dwarfs Using Current Ground-Based Facilities, John Stauffer, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics   14      Search and Analysis Strategies for Substellar and Planetary Companions by Direct Detection, Roger Angel, Steward Observatory, University of Arizona   15      Indirect Detection Techniques Present and Future, Robert W. Noyes, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics   16          2   Observational Characterization of Nearby SMOs   19      Current State of Observations,   19      The Physical and Orbital Characteristics of Known Substellar-Mass Objects, Gibor Basri, University of California, Berkeley   21      Ground- and Space-Based Spectroscopy of the Composition of Brown Dwarfs and Extrasolar Planets, Mark S. Marley, New Mexico State University   22      Comparative Spectroscopy of Brown Dwarfs and Very Late Main Sequence Stars, Rafael Rebolo, Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias   23      Estimating the Role of Brown Dwarfs in Globular Clusters, Ivan King, University of California, Berkeley   24      Brown Dwarf Candidates in Star-Forming Regions, Lynne A. Hillenbrand, University of California, Berkeley   25  3   Theoretical Models of SMO Structure and Atmosphere   27      Current Status of Models,   27     An Historical Perspective on Theoretical Studies of Brown Dwarfs, Peter Hauschildt, University of Georgia   30      Model Atmospheres and Synthetic Spectra of Brown Dwarfs, France Allard, Wichita State University   30      Interior and Evolutionary Models of Brown Dwarfs, Adam Burrows, University of Arizona   31      Theory and Observation of Kinematically Old, Low-Metallicity Objects, Gilles Chabrier, Ecole Normale Superieur de Lyon   34

OCR for page R12
Failed Stars and Super Planets: A Report Based on the January 1998 Workshop on Substellar-Mass Objects  4   Formation of SMOs   35      Starlike and Planetlike Formation,   35      Formation of Substellar-Mass Companions to Stars, David C. Black, Lunar and Planetary Institute   38      Formation of Brown Dwarfs by Mass Transfer, Frank Shu, University of California, Berkeley   39      Formation of Brown Dwarfs and Giant Planets, Peter Bodenheimer, University of California, Santa Cruz   40      Long-Term Dynamical Evolution of Multiple-Component Systems, Martin J. Duncan, Queen's University   42  5   Statistical Detections, Galactic Structure, and the Mass Content SMOs,   45      Microlensing Determination of the SMO Mass Function,   46      Detecting Planets via Microlensing,   47      Microlensing: An Observational Overview, Charles Alcock, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory   48      Microlensing as a Probe of the Initial Mass Function and Galactic Structure, Andrew Gould, Ohio State University   48      Dark Matter in the Universe and Microlensing, Michael S. Turner, University of Chicago and Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory   50      Microlensing and the Search for Planets, Stanton Peale, University of California, Santa Barbara   50  6   Findings and Future Needs   53      Status of Current Research Activities,   53      The Most Compelling Issues for Near-Term Study,   53      Contributions to Broader Scientific Goals,   55      Opportunities for Interdisciplinary Research,   58      The Contribution of Studies of SMOs to Achieving Long-Term Scientific Priorities,   59      Concluding Remarks,   61