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Biographical Sketches of Contributors EILEEN APPELBAUM is associate professor of economics at Temple University. She is on the editorial boards of the Jour- nal of Post Keynesian Economics and Computers and the Social Sciences and serves as a consultant to the Office of Technology Assessment and the Mayor's Commission for Women in Philadel- phia. Her research and writing encompass both theoretical and applied work in labor economics, with emphasis on implications for women workers. She is the author of Back to Work (Auburn House, 1981), an econometric analysis of the experiences of ma- ture women returning to the labor force. Appelbaum is also the author of several articles on employment and technology issues as well as on part-time and temporary work. She has a B.A. in mathematics from Temple University and a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Pennsylvania. CAROLYN L. ARNoLD is a Ph.D. candidate in the sociology of education at Stanford University. Previously she was a com- munity college instructor in women's studies, social sciences, and statistics; a project associate at Far West Laboratory for Educa- tional Research and Development; and a counselor and funding 433

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434 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES coordinator in a community women's health clinic. She has con- ducted research on women's education, gender segregation in the labor market (with Myra Strober), and women's participation in high technology. She is currently researching the development of stratification by gender in technical occupations. Arnold has a B.A. from Smith College, an M.A. in women's studies from San Francisco State University, and an M.S. in statistics from Stanford University. BARBARA BARAN is a postgraduate research fellow at the Berkeley Roundtable on Internal Economy (BRIE) currently work- ing on a study to examine work reorganization and skill change in manufacturing and service industries for the Carnegie Forum on Education and the Economy. Her research has focused on the technological transformation of white-colIar work, with particu- lar emphasis on changes occurring in the structure of women's employment, and included a study of technological change in the insurance industry. Prior to returning to school, she served as a chairperson of the San Francisco Women's Union and was editor of a community newspaper in San Francisco. She has a B.A. in history from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and an M.A. and a Ph.D. in city and regional planning from the University of California, Berkeley. BRYNA SHORE FRASER is a senior program officer at the Na- tional Institute for Work and Learning in Washington, D.C. She is the editor of the Postsecondary Education for a Changing Econ- omy series and the director of the National Study of Employment in the Fast Food Industry. She has done extensive research on employment-related education and training for youth and adults. Her most recent publications have focused on the impact of com- puters and new technologies on training and the workplace. Fraser has a B.A. from Brandeis University and an M.A. in Slavic lan- guages from Indiana University. ELI GINZBERG is A. Barton Hepburn professor emeritus of economics and director of Conservation of Human Resources, Columbia University. From 1941 to 1981 he served as a consul- tant to various departments of the federal government, including State, Defense, Labor, Health and Human Services, and the Gen- eral Accounting Office. He is the author of 100 books, primarily on human resources and health policy, the most recent of which is Understanding lIuman Resources (Abt, 1985~. Ginzberg has an

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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 435 A.B. in social sciences and an A.M. and a Ph.D. in economics, from Columbia University. CLAUDIA GOLDIN is professor of economics at the University of Pennsylvania, research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research, and editor of the Journal of Economic History. She has previously held positions at Princeton University and the University of Wisconsin. Her research interests are in American economic history, and her research subject matter has included urban slavery in the American South, early industrialization, the impact of the Civil War, the postbellum southern economy, and, most recently, the evolution of the female labor force from 1790 to the present. She is currently writing Understanding the Gender Gap (to be published by Oxford University Press). Goldin holds a B.A. from Cornell University and an M.A. and a Ph.D. from the University of Chicago. HEIDI I. HARTMANN is study director (on leave) of the Com- mittee on Women's Employment and Related Social Issues, the Pane! on Technology and Women's Employment, and the Panel on Pay Equity Research at the National Research Council (NRC). She has edited or coedited a number of NRC reports on compara- ble worth and other women's employment issues. Previously she taught economics on the Graduate Faculty at the New School for Social Research. Her research has concentrated on employment issues related to women and minorities, particularly discrim~na- tion and internal labor markets, women's economic independence, and political economy and feminist theory. In the 1986-1987 aca- demic year she is an American Statistical Association fellow doing research on women in poverty at the Bureau of the Census. Hart- mann has a B.A. from Swarthmore College and an M.Ph. and a Ph.D. from Yale University, all in economics. F ELICITY HENWOOD is a social scientist studying gender and technology issues. While working on her contribution to this volume, she was a research fellow at the Science Policy Research Unit. She has published mainly in the area of new technology and women's employment and works in adult education, teaching courses on women and science/technology. Henwood is currently studying for a Ph.D. in the Arts Graduate School of the University of Sussex. H. ALLAN HUNT is manager of research at the W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research in Kalamazoo, Michigan. He has been at the Institute since 1978 and in his current position since

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436 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 1982. His professional experience has involved him in the areas of workers' disability compensation, employment and training policy, and the employment impacts of technological change. Hunt has taught at I.ehigh University; California State University, Hayward; and the University of Connecticut. He studied at the University of Wisconsin; Lehigh University; and the University of California, Berkeley, where he received a Ph.D. in economics. TIMOTHY L. HUNT has been a senior research economist at the W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research since 1981. In 1983, he co-authored an Institute monograph entitled Human Resource Implications of Robotics, which examines the employment impacts of robots in the United States by 1990. With the support of the National Research Council and the National Commission for Employment Policy, Hunt has recently completed several other studies exploring various aspects of the employment implications of technological change. He has published numerous papers and given presentations to government agencies and vari- ous other groups at the state, national, and international levels. He holds a B.A. in history from Otterbein College, an M.S. in economics from South Dakota State University, and a Ph.D. in economics from Kansas State University. MARY C. MURPHREE is New York regional administrator for the Women's Bureau of the U.S. Department of Labor. She for- merly served the Women's Bureau as an expert consultant, direct- ing the bureau's study of the impact of computer-based technology on women clerical workers. She is the author of the recent Women's Bureau publication Women and Office Automation: Issues for the Decade Ahead. Murphree has taught college-level courses, served as a consultant to government and private industry, and written and spoken widely on the subject of women and technology. She received a B.A. from Hollins College and an M.A. and a Ph.D. in sociology from Columbia University. THIERRY J. NOYELLE is senior research scholar at Conser- vation of Human Resources, Columbia University. His areas of expertise include labor market segmentation; technology, change, and employment; the service industries, especially financial and business services; and the internationalization of services. He has a B.A. in economics from the University of Lyons (France), an M.S. in engineering from the Ecole Centrale of Lyons (France),

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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 1 437 and an M.A. in regional science and a Ph.D. in city and regional planning, both from the University of Pennsylvania. MYRA H. STROBER is an associate professor of education at Stanford University. She has been on the faculty at the Univer- sity of Maryland; the University of California, Berkeley; and the Stanford Business School. Her research focuses on women's em- ployment, particularly the relationship between work and family among educated women. Strober's most recent work is on occu- pational segregation. She was one of the founders of the Center for Research on Women at Stanford and served as its director for 7 years and was also the first chair of the board of the National Council for Research on Women. Currently, she is the director of the Stanford Education Policy Institute. Strober has a B.S. in industrial and labor relations from Cornell University and a Ph.D. in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. SHARON HARTMAN STROM is a 1986-1987 fellow at the Bunting Institute of Radcliffe College, on leave from the Uni- versity of Rhode Island, where she is professor of history and a former coordinator of the women's studies program. She recently served as a consultant on several projects related to women's work and technology for the Office of Technology Assessment. She has published work on the history of women's clerical work unions and is currently completing a monograph on the history of the Ameri- can office between 1910 and 1950. Strom has a B.A. from Whittier College and an M.A. and a Ph.D. from Cornell University, where she studied social and intellectual history. ALAN F. WESTIN is professor of public law and government at Columbia University, where he has taught since 1959. A spe- ciaTist in constitutional law, civil liberties, and civil rights, he has for 30 years studied the ejects of new information technologies on organizations, individuals, and society and the impacts of the public policy choices that such developments raise in democratic nations. Among his works are Privacy and Freedom (Atheneum, 1967~; Databanks in a Free Society (Quadrangle, 1972~; and The Changing Workplace: A Guide to Managing the People, Organi- zational, and Requlatory Aspects of Ounce Technology (Knowledge and Industry Publications, 1985~. He is president of the Educa- tional Fund for Individual Rights, a nonprofit research foundation that studies employee rights issues at the workplace. Westin has a B.A. from the University of Florida and an I..~.B. and a Ph.D. in political science from Harvard University.

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438 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES SALLY WYATT is a research associate for The Program on Information and Communication Technology at the Economic and Social Research Council, London, England. Previously she was an economist at the Science Policy Research Unit of the University of Sussex, where she worked on various science and technology policy issues. She is currently conducting research on the transfer of technology from the western oil companies to China's offshore oil industry. She received a B.A. from McGill University and an M.A. from the University of Sussex, England, both in economics.