Further Education

  • Between April 1993 and April 1995, about 6 percent of science and engineering doctorates took college or university courses or enrolled in a college or university for other reasons, such as completing another master’s degree or Ph.D. (see Table 41 ).

  • For those who took courses or enrolled in school, the most frequently cited reason for doing so was to gain further skills (63 percent). This ranged from a low of 49 percent for mathematical sciences doctorates to highs of 77 and 80 percent for agricultural/environmental and health sciences doctorates, respectively. Personal interest was the second most frequently listed reason (52 percent). Mathematical sciences doctorates were most likely to cite this reason (64 percent).

  • For 45 percent of doctorates, their employers paid the school-related costs associated with taking courses. Employers were most likely to pay the costs of courses taken by engineering Ph.D.s (55 percent) and least likely to pay the costs of courses taken by psychology Ph.D.s (34 percent).

  • About 16 percent of those taking courses completed a certificate or another degree.



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Doctoral Scientists and Engineers in the United States Further Education Between April 1993 and April 1995, about 6 percent of science and engineering doctorates took college or university courses or enrolled in a college or university for other reasons, such as completing another master’s degree or Ph.D. (see Table 41 ). For those who took courses or enrolled in school, the most frequently cited reason for doing so was to gain further skills (63 percent). This ranged from a low of 49 percent for mathematical sciences doctorates to highs of 77 and 80 percent for agricultural/environmental and health sciences doctorates, respectively. Personal interest was the second most frequently listed reason (52 percent). Mathematical sciences doctorates were most likely to cite this reason (64 percent). For 45 percent of doctorates, their employers paid the school-related costs associated with taking courses. Employers were most likely to pay the costs of courses taken by engineering Ph.D.s (55 percent) and least likely to pay the costs of courses taken by psychology Ph.D.s (34 percent). About 16 percent of those taking courses completed a certificate or another degree.