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Appendix 8 Demand for and Availability of Translators A. GEOGRAPHICAL DEMAND According to the U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Employment Security, the geographical demand for translators during calendar year 19 64 was centered in Washington, D.C . (see below) . The only other demand recorded on the bureau's interarea recruitment records was as follows: Month, 1964 No. of Openings Locations January 4 Minn., Mo., Ark., Hawaii February 5 N.J., Pa., Mo., Ark., Hawaii March 2 Mo., Ark. April 2 Mo., Ark. May 3 N.J., Ohio, Mo. June 3 N.J., Ohio, Mo. July 2 Minn., Mo. August 2 N.J., Mo. September 2 N.J., Mo. October 2 N.J., Mo. November 2 N.J., Mo. December 3 N.J., Ill., Mo. Although New Jersey and Missouri each appear more frequently than do the other states, the Bureau feels that this repetitive require- ment reflects difficulty in securing qualified persons rather than a turnover of translator personnel. B. GOVERNMENT AGENCIES IN THE WASHINGTON AREA THAT ANNOUNCED VACANCIES IN FISCAL YEAR 1964 (Data supplied by the U.S. Employment Service, District of Columbia Professional Placement Center) 54

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Agency Central Intelligence Agency Department of State U.S. Information Agency U. S. Joint Publications Research Service Voice of America National Security Agency C. GOVERNMENT VACANCIES BY TYPE OF EMPLOYMENT Language (s) Information not available Arabic, Persian, Turkish, Slavic French All Hindi Formation not available (Data supplied by United States Employment Service, District of Columbia Professional Placement Center) I. Full-Time Translators Note: The U.S. Employment Service defines full-time employment in the following categories: (a) Permanent full-timeA position that lasts more than 30 days and has a 5-day, 40-hr week. (b) Temporary full-timeA position that lasts 4 to 30 days arid has a 5-day, 40-hr week. (c) Short-time full-timeA position that lasts less than 4 days and has an 8-fur day. The only agency that requested permanent full-time translators was the National Security Agency. No translators were requested under categories (b) and (c). IT. Part-Time Translators Note: The U.S. Employment Service defines part-time employment in the following categories: (a) Permanent part-timeA position that lasts more than 30 days and has less than an 8-fur day. (b) Temporary part-timeA position that lasts 4 to 30 days and has . less than an 8-fur day. (c) Short-time part-timeA position that lasts less than 4 days and has less than an 8-fur day. Permanent part-time translators (a) were requested by the U.S. Joint Publications Research Service. Temporary part-time translators (b) were requested by Lee U.S. Department of State Foreign Service institute. No short-time part-time translators (c) were requested. It is interesting to note that the agency requesting category (b) translators did not request category (c) translators. D. NUMBER OF AVAILABLE TRANSLATORS IN THE WASHINGTON AREA The U.S. Employment Service, District of Columbia Professional Placement Center, has 523 translators registered. (The number 55

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of available translators (826) exceeds the number of translators registered (523) because many translators indicated their ability to work in more than two languages). A sample of the number of trans- lators available for work in some of the more exotic languages is shown below. Language African Languages Akau Amharic Efik Fante Hausa Ibo Mandingo Swahili Twi Yoruba Chinese Languages Mandarin Cantonese Shanghai Fukien Indian Languages Bengali Guj arati Hindi Malayalam Tamil Telugu Urdu Philippine Languages Bikol Chabokano Ermitano Tagalog Wraywaray No. of Available Translators 2 4 1 2 2 3 1 6 1 3 21 3 3 1 6 4 11 4 5 5 4 1 1 The Committee would like to express its appreciation to Miss E. Catherine Phelps, Manager of the U.S. Employment Service, District of Columbia Professional Placement Center, for her co- operation in providing these data for the Committee's use. 56