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- - 22 Exhibit 13 _ T.~lIN~IOGY 0F SI:lEI`.I}~RY ROCK;, 1937-1939 F. J . Petti j of Univorsity of Chicago, Chic&go, Tll'r.ois The ndnera1ogy of the sedimentary rocks is sometimes thought to be just the Seder of the chewy minerals" of the sedimonts, partic1l1arly of the sands. In the broadest senso, however, fit includes the composition of all sediments including the loss colon typos such as coal, photo, salines, etca In this bibliography the mineralogy of common sediments only is ~hasizod a~ the tochnia.,ues applicable to such materials are Mauri owed ~ ~ survey of the published Caners of the Cast three vears reveals significant trends. Clay-mineral research deserves special mention. The newer todhn~ques of s~plo treatment and the rosined optical, chc~ical alla X-ray methods hairy made possible the progress show in this difficult field. During the past talc years, the Nobly of the fu~lor's earths ~s boon given ~ch attention (65, 77, 92, 1Ol) and it Is apparent that montmor~llonite, the chief clay mineral of these deposits, can for fr=. several types of per ant mat will. min=als are, in some places, precipitate from solution seems certain (114' 133~. 33=orimenta1 to~.ticn of the clay minerals by hydrothe~1 action is of ~ntorest to students of ore deposition as wo11 as those of clay Minoans (103) ~ ~e description ~d ~d~tification c't the "soricito-like" clay Dingy of shales, n=~d illite, by GriE' =~d his associatos (60) arid the excoll=t sundry of tho p:ccs~t state, of our knowledge of the clay Tires and their problems by Grin (58) care givers in two outstanding papers Axe the field of clay-nunera1 investigation. Several stew summaries also merit attention (31, 4~, 9~3, 141' IBM. X-ray studies (17, 63, 69, lob) of the structure of the clay minerals continue to advanea our understands of their properties and affinities. Other cl~y~inoral studies are also rid (3, 4, 52, 59, 61, 76, 117, 155, 143) . ~e tochn~ques of minora1 separation, mounting, identification and frequency determination continue to receive attention. The papers by Tylar a~ t.~=rsd on (140) and Grout (62), prepared for tho Committee. on the Accossory Ir~ls' are the best a~ roost complete crit~ca1 reviews of - the 7abor~to~rymethads published in recant years. Othor techr~ique papers include those related to separation problems (1~, 28, 47, 56, 67-68, ~52) , sample ap]~tting ~5), mounting ~123, 147), optico.l identifi- cation (34), staining (75), dote:min~tior of minor. frequency (36, 54, , That beid<311~e and =me odor clay At, Oth or techninu ~

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E~ibi t B _ __ 23 -- 70' 9S, 122). I;;Iieropyc~cz:~etr~r ~d density dete:emination hairs recentered special ~rnl3hasis of late (fit 115 72' (IS, 158). Iloteworthy also is tile trend toward the adoption o~ the frequency scale and ~neth.od of plotting of Evans' layman and Reed (Wo-] 8 Pe~trol~llm Congress, vol. ~ ~ 1933, London, p. 251-256) as shown by the papers by Carroll (23, 24>, ~r~l;hs (57), and others. In these instances the method of plotting, devised for stratigraphic problems, is used for aral relet' ons a:~ As; not c~ ~ e to the orig~r=1 work of :E0vans and assoc~atos. ~thigenes~s and authigenic minerals also recoined co-~sid=~ation. Of special interest is the high authige:nic feldspar content of shales (en), the Suggestion that authig~.nic feld:~ar is diagnostic of marine sedr~mta- tion (333, the outgrowths on zircon (1243, the relation of ~ntrastratal solution and :rainaral freo~uencies (125), authigenic titanium minerals (2l, 107), authig;enic dolom.~e in glaoio~acustrine silts (1183, a now stud~- of loucoxeno (13g) ~ aM a new X0G=6 0t authigOnic tousling (97) . The auconitc problem contin:ues to roccivo attont~on (2, 51, 60, 1327. The problem of mineral stability aM persistence has merited t~al`y attention from several workers. Ace stability of minerals under-weath.e'- i~; conditions was the subject of &O especially thorough petroch=ic~ study by Goldich (53), from which study- a Umin~a:t stability sorts, identical in species a~ order with the' ''roaction series" of tho ignocus potrdiogists, ~ noticed out. RussOll's suds of tho .7~!ississipvi Rive sands (ilk) is tho most i';~pc:>rtant paper or mino:cal pcx~s~sionce in strew since ~ckie's won't 0~3. the Scottish rivers. Russell depreciates the role of abrasion or breakage in the elind~tion otmineral species . . . during transport. The conclusion to which us self was forced, namely, the olimination of contain spocice by solution following the deposition of the sediment, rocoivos support Ram ~=thsonts work on tho Estuarina series cot Yorkshiro. Smithson (125) showed that the :*richr~oss of thy suitor of hungry ndnorals was in con s,dcrablc paw duo to intrastratal solution. Exporim`3~1 work on resistance to wind abrasion is the Reject of the study by hassled alit Woodruff (963. . . ~ithson's paper is one of the most stimulating and original papers and is therefore revel at leach. It is a Angularly bike example of- t:~e trend, pointed: out by this reviewer in his last report (104), toward collection of quantitative data on the mineral composition of sed~- monts and the preparation of isopleth was to show such data. kot~ne~ f:euit~l Ad unusually co~pleto study is tat of Boa'< (6) on the bottom sediments of the southern: Nor to Sm. The motI=ds end philosophy of the 33dO1n~n school of spry petrol ogi sts pro we11 statea ~n this paper. The value of heavy mineral percentages i ~ exceptionally IBM show by the papas of Russell, Smithson Lana Beak. The study of accessory Dineros of sediments is now Ural more oxtmsively in the study of g;lacia1 geology and its p3~=s Am, 49,. 57,

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}bible B _ . . . _ 81, 84) (soo also I~.ynin`3, ^. Jour. Scz., vol. 33, 1937, p. 111-1393 as well as to the o~ucidation of ordinary strat~graphic problems and paloo- geography ~ 12 ~ 16, 20 ~ 25 ~ 37, 42 ~ 71~ 73 ~ 89, 94, 113 ~ 128 ~ 130 ~ 144 150), economic geology (85) and industry (44, 50). . , , Iho imp ortanco of sc>di~no=tol~gy and the interest in this fiord are demonst}~ated.not only by the large Further of papers published ~n recent years, but also by the appearmuce of a number of larger works devoted entirely or in co~iderab~e part to this sub ject. These include Barth, Correns, and E6kola, 'nester der Gesto~no" (8), ~bein and Petti30hn, 'manual of Sedimentary Petrography" (82), a second edition of l~cI;el~ 's "termination of the Fr=ontal :!locks" (134), Trask And collaborators "Recent Dire Scdimonts" (157), ~ third oration of Thatch Id R.astal1 (revived by Slick) "Potrology of thc Sodixnontory Rocks" (66), am W. H. Tw=hotei 'tPrinciplos of Sedimontat~c:~138~. Tho rogulor aberrance of ~e reports of the Co~nn~1ttee on Sedimentation and the publication of a sprig "Sediment Heft" of Geolo;;,~sche Rundschau (1938) are farther witness to the virility awl promise of the study of sedi=.~onts. . . . . .. . Acknowledgment is ;herob~y made to the Geological Society of ~rler~ca for certain references included ~n this bibliography. ~ch roforences, not examined by the minor, care marked with ,'G. S. h.t' enclosed: ~n paren- theses following the retercece in question. 1. Align, Honrictto and Vatan, A.. Contritu Lion a ~ ' Etude petrographiqlle dos sables stamp' ens. Soc. Gcol. France, B. s. 5, i. 7, p. 141-162, 1937. . . . . Heavy m~no~l and grain sizo &.ll~l7SOS, Bra =~?holocy ~ St=`pinn (terti~ry3 sands of the Paris basin, :Fra::co. If. S. A.) . ~. . . .. 2. ^11~n, Victor T.: ~ shady of Missouri glauco~t0. An. Mineral., vol. 22, p. 11~-13 83, 1937. Tho absence of rutilo roodlos cold the low i;~tania contort of the glue of tho Bounetorre dolomite of t~.tIissouri led ^13= to doubt ~ bauxite origin for the s Edge, such as was postulctod by Gali5:her for the glauconits of Montoray Bay, California. ~ biotito origin for the glaucon~te-like min=~1 coated the s=facc of the sand grains in too upper port of the St. Pot On is likewise doubtful accord: to =1~. On tho other hand, the gl~.uconito of the Portors CrecI; and the Clayton fo~tioins (Eocono) of I.~issouri could . . . . . . well have forr,~d: from biot-ito as contained rutted x:codlos Ad : associated heavy minor~ls of metamorphic origin sit, . - . .. . .

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Whit it B 3. -- 25 - : The Cheltenham clay of Missouri. Appendix 7, . 59th i3~enni~ Rept. Missouri Gool. Survoy arid flitter -resources, 1937. We Cheltenha~ clay of Penns,~,rlv~a~ian age contains valuable commercial flint Id plasti c fire clays in east ce~-ltr~ ~isso~i. This report contains ~nfo~ation concerting the occurrence and mineral composition of the Cholto~ara clays and should be valuable in the exploration, utilization, and solution of problems rolotod to the bur3:~irg behavior of these clays. The flint clays are colored mainly of ~lloysi te am mi cros copi c kaolinit e . The pi asti c clays are composed chiefly of k~ol'~ito with scam quartz and smaller amounts of ~ sericite-like mineral and minor accessory :~3~norals. The clay m' nrals deposited to form tho Cholic~hom wore derived by Authoring of the sericite-liko Anoraks in the clayey, dolo:nitic la~n~cstones of isS~Puxi, and tho rcsid~1 =antlo below the Pennsylvanian contains these m~ncraa ~ and pet chs of the soric~to-liko m~er.~.~1 altered to koolinito. Disconfotmchly above too Choltenh~n Biro ~;xcon Ad gray clays composed of tho sericite-11~e r=~oral, kaolinito, and quartz that were crodod from the lowor part of the rogolith Ad from the Cheltonh~n - author 's abstract. 4. ^antanc.ray<=a Iyer, ANTI. R.: On the possible ocotu~rc~ace a~ co~posi- t~vn of ~ now kind of m~or~1 substance ire. SQ=O clays. t..{j.ysorO Geol. :~opt., Roc. v. 36, p. 108-117, 1938. ~ G.S .A. ~ 5. Anonymous: Splitting ~11 silos ~ccuratol~y with the micro-spl~ticr. Em. tvill~ TOUR., vol. ITS, p. 185-186, lg37. The nocossity for accuratcl-~- t.~;ir~ small plus for Ct1~1C~ and microscopic analysis is cmphasiz'3d. Tho problom of taking small sompl's is solved by maws Q t~ micro-split/or of miniature Jones type riffle wilt up from natal paw cut Id bolted together in ~ manner very similar to the Otto I~6icrosplit (Joint. Sod. Potrology, vol. 3, p. 30, 1933~. 6' Bask, J. A.: Rogiona1 petrology of the southern Forth Sea. Wag eking en, 1937 ~ ?), pp. 127. This work Is prefaced with ~ review of the philosopher and methods of the :E:de~man school of sedimentary petrology. lhe definition Qua a sedimentary petrologic province, the criteria for the ~ .-_ delineation of ~ province, the several kinds of variations in Mineral as so ci ati ons and thoi ~ c ~ scs are bri oily rovicwod. Tho :mot ho d used Is t,':at of common practice with the exception of ~ rather drastic

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-- 26 -- Exhibit B digest of the sand first with concentrated HC1 Id then with EJO~. No separation into sizes is Garde. One hundred grains of non-opaque minerals are counted. Both light a~ heavy fractions wore ex~nd. : The mineral composition of over 400 samples is tabulated. . . . ; . . .: . . i : Fo3zlowing; a repin ct al n former stud es of the pathology of the North Soa bottom am mrroundi~ coasts, Beak presents his data based on. the study of over lOOO samples. Five provinces Or mineral assoed;at.ion type me Recognized, .n~mely, an F-~;ro up. marked by a gqx~et - epidot-sau$~r~te-ho~blende assQc~ati ion, an A-group- mainly g;~net-ep~dote-~rnblende' ~ grip Wilt a garnot-aug~to association, a~North Under group, s~;=lar to recent Rhine sand and.marked by ax aug~te~hornblende-saussurite association, arm lastly a bottom type. of. Tertiary dertrat~;on marked .~,J a z~rc~-garx~et-~tile assemblage. The r.egionaQ di stributi-on of tho associations ma the mixed border typos are described Id mapped.. Special discussion is gi.ven.of the Dutch aM French coastal zones. . -- . A chapter is devoted to the deseription.of the minerals identified. Over 30 species and varieties and rock fragments are recognized. Finally;a section on the..geologic Houston of the North Sea basin aids probable sources.of the several ~:ue=:L associations is . . .. . . . . . . . . . . outlined. Basically the North. Sea bottom,. is a sub~.,erged landscape and not an area in which sedimentation ~s taking place on ~ large scale. Hence the bottom deposits do relate to the later :;eologic I}~stor:r of this areas .: The A-grollp is mainly glacial from ScaxLdanavia;; ;the E-group is also~glacicl but of English Id Scottish origin, -the Tertiary group is locally derived from Tertiary sub- agueous outcrops; the H-g;roup is ~ Mingling of ~ino-type sand with subordinate-flu~oglac~.~1 ~teri~1 who n the Riss ice blocked the North Sea and forced the drainage through .the English Channel; the North timider group is ~ sand deposited by the Rune dur'~.a "low terrace" stage. Bannister, F. A. and hey, he lI.: ~ Ash micro-pyRnocnetric method for the specific gravity of heavy solids; ~th a note on the accuracy of specific grayly dote~minations. Mineral. Rag., . VQ). 25, p . 30-34 j 19~ . . . . . . . . . . . 8. Barth, T. ~ Corrals, C. and Esko~a, P.: vail Clues 422 pp. Berlin, 1939. . . . , . Dio Enstelmn~ der Ges . This volume consists. of three parts' on. the igneous' the sedimentary and:met~o~ph~e rocks, written by Barth, Correns and

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~hitit B - -- 2 7 -- Ursula, respect rely. - The pa:: t dealing with the sediments is ~n four sections. The first section on weathering followers the usual treatment with perhaps a little more emphasis on the ~;eochemica;L aspects than is common in texts. T'ne second section, on classic sediments, is ~ discussion of the mass transport of material in light of mod=n hTdro- dynamic theory and also ~ discussion of the "George" of the classic rocks, and finally a resume of the characteristics of the principal types. ~e chum; cat and b~oge:~' c sedi~-~nts, Portia the sub Jack of the-third section, are handled in forms of "geoch~ Cal cycles." The phase relations involved in salt deposition receive ample treat;mant. Theses elements which participate ~n che~,ical-biogen~c cycles but which do not form deposits, such as bromine, barium, etc., are given special attention. A final section on diagenesis concludes the part dealing With sodim~ts. Tho quantitative approach is emphasized through; by the nitrous tables, cats and-d~agrar~. 9. Barkedale, Julian D.: Silicitied wooden dolonite. am. Olin., vol. 24, p . 69g-704, 1939 . 10. Baudre, G. and Berthois, L.: . Cont~=butiorl a l' etude de quelques sables du department de la Blanche. Soc. Linn. Nor~andie, 33. s. 8, vol. . 9, p. 89-102 1 1937. 11. Behrens, Martin and Holzuer, Julius: :Eine Schnell- used ~omethode zur Besting des Suez. Gewichts von Minezalien und Gesteinsk=ponenten. Zentr. Bin., Abt. A, p . 373-384, 1937 . ~ rapid method for the determination of the specific gravity of small samples of Lateral. Too pieces of apparatus, (1) to make at'd~fusion" col,~Tun in a centrifuge tube, and (2) a pipette-manometer to Ample and measure density in column at any level. 12. Bellair,- Pierre: Sur yes Iotas- sableuses de 1a Masse Provence ori~tale. Acad. Scot . Paris, C. B. t . 205, p . 999-1000, 1937 . The sanely sediments of the Terrub~ Donation, Provence, are assigned to the Permian on the basis of their heavy mineral content. Comparisons are made between the minerals of the sands in question Id thos ~ o ~ b oth 33oceno ~d Fermi an age . 13. : Was cents lourds den ~ es sables d~sertiques. Acad. act . Paris, C. Pt. t. 207, no. 22, p ~ 1054-1056, 1958.

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if O<] - - ~ ~ - - E~ib~t. B ~_ ; . Detelmir~tlon of Me heavy mineral fractions of two grasps .0t So fry the .~hara D.es=~.. : . 14. Berg, Ernst: ~ method for the mneralog~ca1 fractionation of sediments by m~ of heavy liquids and the centrifuge-. J . Sed. Petrology, ~1. ~ ~ p. 51-54 ~ 1937 . The minerals that settle from heavy lia,,uid to the lower ma of ~ common centrifuge tube Star run may be removed by pipette designed by Berg. The constriction and use cuff this pipette are dosc3:ibed. 15. Berthoi s, L. and Furnestin, ~ .: Etude des . sediments - dresses par lo President Theodore Tillier (Plateau Continental Colte-~ncho et Mer du Nord).. Acad. Sci. Paris, C. R. t.. 20d, p. 1876- ~ 878, 1937 . A study. af the bottom samples collected bar the President Theodore Till' e' from the contln=tal plateau Celte-;~.anche and the North Sea shows four sedated types. The authors, unlike Eden man (42 7 43) and Bay, (6) conclude tat the quantitative mineral composition of a Wayne sand is not Efficient to detonnine its origin. 16. Bohmer, J. C. A.: Over de potrologische Sarnonstelli~g van de ou~artalre sodi~cutn in noordolij~ Ned~land. Guile & ~jubouw, 's-~rav~age, fig. 16? nos. N 1, 1937. 8, p . 6C-64, 0 1, . .. . . . . - On the petrologic composition of the early Qua ternary sediments of north;:e~ Netheriands. (G. S. A.) . . . .. . . 17. Bragg, William H.: 1. G1a'Je Roy. Inst. Great Britain, Pr. v. 30, pt . 1, no . 140, p . 39-67 ~ 1938. X-ray analyses to determine estructura1 properti es of claym~nerals. be. S. a-.) 18. Brammall, A.: The correlation of sediments by mineral criteria in The science of petroleum (Dunstan ~d others). -; v. 1, p. 312-314, London, 1958. hi. S. I.)

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exhibit B , _ -- 29 - 19. Bray' A.: Structure and non-calcaroous residues of the Carboniforons limes tone ct the Clitheroe area. p . 423~30, 1959. Proc. Geol. Assoc., vol. 50, Samples collected from each inch or two across each stratum were crushed and dissolved in dilute BC1. Me liquid was decanted from the residues which were then elutriated Id droll which material larger tan .02 am. was separated into light and hungry fractions. Detrita' material - o:~;cept in the shyly beds - was. very Mall in quantity and detrita] mineral species are accordii~ly very rare. Secondary mineral s, namely, pi - to, fluorite and some quartz, are locally abundant. The limestones are interpreted as (l ~ black muds of shallow water origin with Cal careou~ rains of tora=niferal tests j etc., (2) reet-knolls marked by reef~bullding foes and by deity of true laud, and (3) relatively non-foss~l~terous well- bedded limestone 'devoid of Scaly material aid toraminif~al remains. .. 20. Brin~an. R.: Schwe~inerale und Palaor:so~raPhie. Geol. Bur~dsch. Bd. 29, p. 3468-356, IO38. Study of the occurrence of heavy minerals in sediments is an aid in interpreter paleogeography, shown by analyses of Mesozoic sediments of northwest Germany. 21. Butterfield, T. A.: B:rook~te in the brim stone G:=t of Yorkshire. Geol. Sage, vol. 76, A. 220-22S, 1939. In the Pen=na area the Millstone Grit is rich in titanium minerals. The bookie present shows a variate 0[ habits, namely, (3) a grime type, , . a d~b-bell habit, (2) a lattice type, a bundle type, and (5) a cluster type. In addition some brookites have ususual markings and colorations and still another type i s marked b y opt ical anomaly es . The stratigraphic distribution of the varietal forms is satirized in quantitative manner in a table. 22. Carroll, Dorothy: Come aspects of soil mineralogy. Roy. 5oc. Western Australia, T. v. 23, p. 7-12, 1957. Investigates heavy mineral assemblages from soils of several West Australian localities with ~ vierr to detent, the nature of the parent rock. (G. S. A.)

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-~ 30 -- prohibit B _ _ 23. : Recording the results of heavy mineral analyses. ~ . . en J. Sed. Pot3~olo'gy, vol. 8, p. 3-9 ~ 1938. Ibe heavy manuals of the soil s of the Wostorn Australian goldfiolds were isolated and about 500 grains counted. Ire mineral frequencies were grouped into three sub-grmps and the composition of each sample was rspresentod by a point on ~ trade diagram. Two fisids Wor& ow dent, namely, a "Gronstono" Bell and a t?graniti c, gneiss! c and mota-s Dry" field. ~ rr oditi cation of tho method of the Bush Oil Company (florid Potrol. Oo~. Proc., vol. 19, 1935, p. 251) was also used. (Iroal Lathe than strati- graphic position make the "curares" obtained by this method meani~- less -F. J. P.) 24. 25. Beach sands from :~3~bur~r, Western Australia. . . . . . Jour. Sed. Petrology, vol ~ 9 ~ p ~ 95-104 ~ 1939 ~ Sixteen sales of beach sand were sieved (We~dworth scale) and the equivalent grade and grading factor determined. Tile sands from beaches Prosed to the open sea were in general coarser than those tram the somi-enclosed bay. Heavy minerals from two grades wore isolated. Species idontit~ed Marc :~agnotite, i~on~' calcite, amphibole, to~&line, ~ oucoxene, garnet, epidote, kyanite, ziroon, Utile, monazite, zoisite, stau:mlite, silliman~te, sphere, apatite, pyroxene, spiel, topaz?, and corundum. The light minerals and the carbonate cont eat wore also did. The Recut deposits of the coastal plain, the local tholoiito flow, Permian sandstonos, the pro-Cambrian oft tho :~e,xU~ scamp and plateau, the pr-Cambrian guesses of the Nat~al~ste area am even the local breakwater all sem to have contributed to the salads. : ~ note on the mineralogy of the Gibbon Chalk, Western Australia. Proc. Geo].. Assoc., vol. 50, p. 226, 1959. Samples of the Cretacoous origin Chalk were reduced in acid, the residues dried, sieved and the h - vy manuals isolated by bromofo~m. }leavy minerals identified Ad described were "opaques," zircon, garnet, Futile, to~alino, epidote, a~phibo.le Ad chlorite, Sphere, lactase, kyanite, andalusite, sillimanite, brookite and monazite. Light Minoans include glauconite, quartz ~d feldspar. Lost of the species are detrita], though some (glauconite and the tita:~iterous g~c~up) are authigenic. lye distributive province at the sc~ty heavy mineral residue is not Ce~J idmlifiod.

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Exhibit B _ 26. vol. 76, p. 6-22, 19~39. -- 31 -- 1.~ovement of sand by the wind, Geol. Wag., Its sand on the beach near Perth, Rested ~ustra3.ia, was examined in detail. Wind velocities rm,uired for cloy one nt wore. recorded. I''1echan~ca:1 analyses the 17 samples are tabulated and axe represented by We curves and h~tog;ra:rs. I~e roundness of the grains (estimated) and the heavy minerals of the sands were d etexmined and tabulated. The ,~orrolations betwoon sand novomor~ and dampness, size, roundness, mineral composition,, End velocity arid ~rariati~it,,: are briefly summarized fry the data gown in this study. 27. Cleaves, Arthur B.: Discussion c, 'tCond~tions of sedimentation And sources of the Oriskany sandstone as indicated by petrology'' by Marce11us B. Saw. 13u11. A. 4. P. G., val. 22, p. 1108- 11 ~ 1, 1938 . I,16~nly a criticism of the st~at~graphic part on Stow 'a paper. Z8. Cohee, George V.: Intensive equipment for reclaiming; heavy liquids. Joy . Sed . Petrology, Carol. 7, ~ . 54-35, 1957 . Cohee unifies the oft described technique of removing the alcohol in br~nofo~ or acetylene tetrabror;~de bar washing It water. The apparatus co mists of ~ inverted 2-1~ter reagent bottle supported bar ring stand from Each the heavy liquid hay be conv=~ent- ly draw af ter s eparc;tion f rc`n the ~1 sion we ~h water . 29 . : Sedi`.~nts of the su~x~arine c=yons off the California coast. Jour. Sed. Petrology, vol. 8, p. 19-33, 1938. The sediments in the numerous subr~ar~no canyons off the California coast may be ch~racte~zed as sad, Mostly fine sand, mth an abundance of silt aM sore May. They are ~n general very well sorted. Rock trag~e;lts and boulders have been dredged from many canyons. Bed rock' crops out ol1 the sates of Monterey, Carme1, and Scripps canyons. The median grain sizes in the canyons are slightly lower than on the adjacent is of the shelf. There are variations in Bedim grain sizes in the canyons but the: e ~ s It always a decrease in median grain size ~th increasing depth. Short cores fry 9i:re Bill mn-yon showed no stratification of the sediments. Heavy minerals melee up only ~ very small part of the sediments. Authigenic minerals Clod organic material are common

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-- 32 -- .. A. Exhibit B ~n the deep or porti offs of the canyons. The c alc~.,m carbonate contort ;; incro~ses with depth dale to incroast3 in abundanoo of or&;anisr~s - - Author's abstract. . . . . . . - . . . . . , ! ' . , Statistical constants (median and coefficients of sorting and ~ :~3~vne5~) 'are Live tor''45 bottom''s~pl~3s and for three-port~ons : each of seven bore samples'. Analyses shown graphically' as. histograms. . . . '\aaln emphasis' on' mechanics 'analyses;' minor treatment of mammals. :~ .: : - . . ,. . , . , %,. . . . . 30. Oooke,'H. ':3. S.: ~ eyep iBC e micro-planir~eter. ' Mineral. I., "vol'. 25,; p. 388-3g4, 1938. . . . ... ..- . - For a reel measurements v; ~ th petrographi c mi cro s cope . 31. Correns, Carl;W.:; 'Die Tone.''': Geo1.' Runaschau Bd. 29, p. 201-215, '' ' ' '' :~9563 - . . ~.. . . r2 ~ Methods of study;' components of clays - residual, detrital9 and authige~c material, and b~ogenic and amorphous constituents; relation between mayoral content and grain sizes .... . . . . .. . . . . . . . ~ . . . . ~ ,. : Zu:e Frag,e der Noubildung van Glimmer in . . ; jungBn ~edi~.ent=. 'Geol. :2unds'chau :~3d. 29, p. 220-222, 1938. Secondary for.~on of Icy in present~day sediments is Me - to change in the~physico-chemicalpropert~es clothe sediments. . .. . : 33. Crowl'e~y, A. J.:,' Possible criteria for d~sti~u'~ing between marina and non-m~r~ne' sediments. Bull . A. A. :~. G., vol. ' 23, p.' 1716-ZO, Ig39. Orow1ey no~s that the Brine sediments exhibited e' ther (~) well formed enbedral crystal of feldspars, (2) new growth a:b out nucleus of c1astic [eldsp~s, or (3) aggregates of feldspar and/or quartz grains cernent<3a by secondary-growth feldspar. In no case see non-ma:r~ne sediments show those relations. One hundred samples wem examined. 34. Denae~,rer, E. and Gonieau,' ].: I,Iethode optique de d'~temination et tab1 eaus des minerals transparent s ou opsa,.ues dos . . . concentres des sables d~al'1uvions. Boo. Gcol. Bol~iq,ue, In. t. 60,: B. p."'i3-266-B-29G, 19'37'. ...... . , .. ; . ..

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Inhibit ~ _ and anatase. -- 59 -- Pam II deals with grain size measurement and graphical representation of the same. I'he length and breadth of the grains of the more abundant m' near s ware determined by ~ cliometric metho ds . :E requencies were plotted as a curve. When size Is plotted on a log;arit~aic scale the curves are nearly symmetrical. We breadth Is plotted against length and "fields" for each species are thus delineated. Special discussion Is given for the diagrams of zircon, garnet Part ITI discusses the methods by which the data of sedimentary petrology may be most usefully recorded on a flap. Smithson used his study on the :15stuarine series of northeast Yorkshire as an example. Some 667 sables frown an area of about 1500 square miles were studied. The samples were groped ~ nto geographical districts and the data from each district averaged Ad a numerical value entered upon the map at the center of each district. Data plotted were (~) "richness of the suites (of heavy minerals) or number of mineral specim present over and above a certain minimum common to all Samples, (2) presence or absence of a particular species or the frequency of the species In question, (~) frequency difference between two related species, such as i1Tnen$te and leucoxex~e, (4) ~rieta1 features, and (5) dimensional and shape indices of the s~;~;te. For the last "mentioned, zircon was chosen am 10 grains ITS Each separate examined. In each sample determinations were made of the largestvalue of the crystal length, the~average length, the greatest breadth, the average breadth, the geometric mean af the average length am breadth, and the ratio ret the average length to the average breadth. For each characteristic determined, a map was made and contours drawn through points of equal value. For each character) stic a certain pattern was noted with "highs"' and ''lows". Inspection of the many maps showed but two t:,pes of pattern. One type, that shown by the richness of the wite, the varietal characters (Ollt- g;rowth$ on zircon and the crystal habit of anat;ase), the presence or absence of garnet, etc., re:l~lected the history of the sediment subsequent to its deposition. Since the Dams" of the pattem depicted coincided ivies the tectonic axes of the region, Smithson thought tat the tectonic history must in SOT~e waif modify the mineral characteristics of the sediment. The other pet tern, shown by the diment~onal and shape characteristics of zircon, etc., reflects the co:~ditiorm of sed=Q<3ntation su cl} as the confi~ratior of the basin, direction of cuxre:~t movement, etc. 126. Stetson, Y. C. and Upeon, J. :E:.: Bottom deposits of the :Ross Sea. Jour. Sed. Petrology, vol . 7, p . 55-56, 1937 .

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- 60 -- ~ibi t B _ 1 ~- The Ross Sea is floored with bifacial debris upon which the sea has exercised no selective action what sower. The sediment is apparently being laid dow~i in the stale corn in which it is being released by the~:melting ice. .Distance from the ibe barrier and dep~ ~f water have no affect on texture; we Artaretic continent it surx'~un.ded by a zone at this material 200 to 500 m'1eS wide, which ntles the continental shelf arid slopes. at might be tenned a marine till. The percentages of the clay and coiioid run unusually high. Such complete lack of sorting is unusual in ellt her a deep or shallow water marine sediment, even in the Atotic where the deposits are also largely laid down by floating ice. Ably the heavy minerals, those cat the [erro~gnes~an group are unusually abundant. Ml the heavies are comparatively unaltered, which is undoubtedly Me to glacial conditions. Higher grade metamorpl minerals are notably absent. In the rinser grades chemically decomposed material ~ 9 found which use probably dun to. the g;l aciai grinding of shales rather than to present conditions either on land or in the sea - Authors' abstract. ; . . . ~ . . 127 ~ Stewart, Duncar~:, Tr .: An o ccurrence "of detrita1 authigeni c - fed dspar. A1Q. I`I:ineral., vol. 22, p. 1000-1003, 1937. An aqueogIac~al sand from a well hear Mt. t;.Iorris, Michigan, was separated into light and heave- fractions in Die usual way. The light fraction was in turn split into two parts, one essentially quartz and the other mainly feldspa:r. 1~'rt:T~fc>ur ~eral-spec~es or principal Moieties. were identified. of special interest were the detxital grains of feldspar Munich were worn grains of authigen~cally-~nlarged feldspar. . The nuc1 ear parts were in port microcline; the margins, growth was in part adularia. Paleozoic sedimentary Connations are believed to be the source of the auth' gent c fed dspar . 128. Stow ~ A. H.: Conditi one of s ed~mentation and sources of the Or~skany sandstone as indicated by petrology. TE3ulLe A. A, P. G., vol. ~ 22, p. 541-564, 1938. The no, areal extent, and the strat~graphic relations of the Orgy Mom New York to Virgir}ia are reviewed. sine formation is thickest in western I~Iaryland and thins both north and south to nearly :nothing along the outcrop. brine fossils testify to marine conditions. The coarseness of the sand and the sorting into lenses of sand and conglomerate Aghast near-shore origin. . . . The light arid heavy mineral content of 94 samples is tabulated.

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Exhibit B ~ _ ~ 29. 130. -- 61 -- Quartz is the sole light mineral in two-thi.~ds of the samples and ~ s the dominant -era in most others. Associated with quartz are a little [e3Ldspar a~ less chert. Dominant heavy minerals are t~rTi~a- line, zircon, leucoxene and limo:~t.e, which suggest derivation fr on: pre-e~isting sediments. Stile is ~pari~l-y present in many samples. Locally pyrite chlorite, amphibole, hypersthene, garnet, kyamte, iL:nerrite and magnetite, biotite and celestite are present.. These latter minerals, except pyrite and chlorite, are restricted to the northern Oriskany arid are believed to be derived from Adirondack crystalline rocks. . Reflection of provenance ire heat minerals . . of the Awes :Edv~. Jour. Sed. Petrology, vol. 9, p.. 86-91 1939. k study of samples of sand collected from the James River of Virginia between Clifton Forge, Alleghany County, and Srn~thfield, Isle of Might County, shows a distinct correlation between stream sediments Ad country rock of the adjacent drainage area. There is a marked difference irk the mineral content of the sands derived fr~ the rocks of the four principal physiographic provinces - viz. ~ the sedimentary rocks of the Valley and Ridge, the igneous rocks of the Blue Ridge, the metamorphic rocks of the Piedmont, and the sedimentary rocks of the Coastal Plain - Anthor's abstract. Dati fig Creta c ecus -ho c ene ~ e cto ni c mov event s in Big Horn Basin by heavy minerals. Geol. Soc. Axe., Bull., vol. 49, p ~ 731-762, ~ 938 . Ails paper Is a qualitative study of the heavy minerals of the lance, Fort Union and Wasatch beds of the Big Horn Basin. Specimens were collected from care fully measured sections of these formations. Heavy mineral s identified were the "opaques" (un- difterentiated magnetite, i~erlite, lirnonite, leucoxene, hematite and pyrites, anatase, anLydr~te, apatite, barite or celestite, biotite, brooks e, chlorite, drossy de, epidote, garnet, hornblende, kyan~te, Muscovite, ~tile, staurol ite, sphere, tou~line and zircon. Light minerals were quartz, chert, am the feldspars. Me heavy mi nexal s were of stratigraph~-c value ~n that - thin certain limits the members of the Lance, Fort Union, and Wasatch formations could be distinguished frown one another. The mineral assemblage increases in complexity upward in the section; the ~asatch has the most varied mitral content. This is . . interpreted to mesh tat extensive areas of crystalline rocks not available to the lower horizons were exposed to denudation ~n

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-- 62 ~- ~bi t B _ _ TIa~atch time. Some interfonnation~l volcanic erup.tions. were the source of the iiornblende of the Wasatch. The introduction of this mineral dates the volcanism as post-Fort Union and pre-Wasatch. . . . .. . . ~.. .~ . 131. Stuart' A. and Simpson, B.:. The sho:re s=ds of Cornwal:L and i; Deron from Land's Etd to:.the Ta~Torri;dge. T;stuary. flea=, Royal Soc. Cornwall, 1957 ; .. : . , ... . .: . .. I:ighte en samples from the beaches were examined and found to contain over 60 species of minerals. These Me described and the; Relative abidance determined by count. .. . . .. ... . . . Focal variations In frequency are: due either to distance Fran soi:~Pce of to contributions froth local bedrock, suc3) as any of the various granite stocks of Cornwall, their metamorphic Aureoles and older sedimentary beds of several ages. Erosion of marine glacial deposits may be the source of st~.1 other constituents. e lo:~shore drift is apparently not great enough to mask the essential local origin of most of the Minerals. Bach bay constitutes ~ trap out of Itch The sands do not move. : ~ The Salines were classified as angular, sub-arLgular, sub-rounded Ad rounded and the proportions of each type in all samples were retina. The results were graphically show by me=s of 'tsa~lboat" or ukite" diag;rams. The tou~line of Fanatic sources ~s angular, whereas that of sedimentary sources i s mb-angulp;r to s~b-round ~ But as the towline of the latter type ~ very =all, the cons~d(erable roundness of the larger grains of this species at several loca;tities is attributed to shore action. Shore action rather than rearer action ~ $ concluded to be tile true rounding agent. Of special interest is the id~omorphic. anatase, ,nterpret- ed as detrital, and the idiomorphic barite thought possibly to be prtec~pitat'3d;frcta the waters of the Taw 13s~ary. 132. Ta3cahashi, )~-ichi: Synopsis of glaucon~t~zat~on. In ' Recent Fine Sediments, Tulsa, 1939, p. 502-512. .. Glau-coni ti zation Fees place under :reduc~ng conditions, in sea water cuff normal salinity and with summer temperature of not lower than 150 C. The chanica1 composition of glauconite is given fir ~ ~lpi:~3. cal formula calculated ir~ the analyses of several homilies of specially purified ~teria1 and by the structural fo~la fox G~iner~s assumptions. Glauconite was found to contain some easily replaceable bases, the replace- ment of which seemed not to affect greatly either the X-ray spectra

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Exhibit B 65 ~- or the optical properties. The glancon~to dehydration curare i unique and unlike that of the micas and chiorit es. Glauconite is formed from clay matter Within cavities in fossils, such as forami~iife-~-a,: the c=~1 of sponge spicules, etc., frown facoal pellets, and from eerily hydrated siliceous materials such as Volcanic glass and opaline silica and also OFF alteration of feldspar, pyroxene and mica. Taka~shi rejects the theory that g;laucon~te is the alteration product of any particular mineral (suchas mea). GI~uconitizatior~ of '\nud" is characterized by hydration of silica and absorption of potash and iron and loss of alumina. Organic matter promotes the change. Fresh water inhibits the transto~tion. Ex;perimental data are cited. The presence of g~aucon~te in sandy sedi.~aents is attributed to transport and sorting. 133. Tarr, W. A.,Eelle~r, W. D.: Some occurrences of ksolin~te deposited face solution. Am. In., vol. 22, p. 933-935, 1937. ~olinite in veins in Pennsylvanian shades, in joints in dolomite and in quartz geodes and mall solution cavities in silt- -stone is described. Optical and X-ray data confine tibe idex~tifica tion of the kaol~rrite. 134. Tickell, F. G.: We 3~a~inat~on of Fragmental Rocks, 2nd ed. Stanford University, long, p. 154. (Reviewed in Jour. Sed. Petrology, vo1. 9, p. 42' 1939.) 135. TomI~nson, W. Harold and laster, Adolph E.: On the origin of montanor~llonite. Am. In., vol. 22, p. ll24-~127, 1937. Monl~norillo:nite was found to be formed at Glen Riddle, Delaware County, Pennsylvania, by the attack of mag:nes'~m . solutions on plagioclase of about the composition db6dn . We montmorilloIlite occurs along a horizontal joint seam in a gabbroid material and in the wall rock adjacent to the seam. 136. T:E:ask, Parker D.: Calcium-carbonate content of some California Mesozoic am Tertiary sediments. Deol. SQc. Am., Bull. 49, p. 1169-~182, 195~3.

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- - ~ - - 137. Track, Parker D., et al: 13p. 736. Exhibit B _ Recent =~ne sediments, Tulsa, 1939, (See G:~imj Takahashi, Pettijohn, Kelley, Camel, Gal~iber). . . . . . . . . . . . 138. Twenhotel, W. E. pp. 610. ; Principles of sedimentation. New York, 1939, Deal ~ i ~ the mai n w~ th sedimentation - ~ process - rather Chat with the petrology of the sediments. Speei~ emphasis is given to the environments of sedimentation. The ~neral canposi- tion cf sediments is treated ~ncidenta:Lly in a number of places in this book, particularly in the chapter on the classification of sediments ~d sedimentary rooks Id minerals. Some treatment is .- given also in the orbiters on the own of inorganic sediments fin connection with soils and weathering, 'n the chapter on the classic sediments and in the section dealing with sediments oP chemical Orion. 139. Tyler, S. A' ma Marsden, R. W.: The nature of leucoxene. Jour. Sed. Petro logy, vol ~ 8, p . 55-58 ~ 1938 . Earls er studies of leucox~e are reviewed, the mineral ~s described and X-ray analyses am cor~pa~ed with those of futile and anatase. The X-ray data show that 1eucoxene as a distinct mineral species does not exist but that it is identical with Stile or with anatase. It is recommended that the new be retained to DeskMate mi coo crystal ~ ine .TiO2. Leucox~e is an alteration product; of titani~-tearing miner~s. Alteration may be either bydro-thermal or weathering. . lo. l~y-ler, Stanley ad harshen, Ba:Lph W.: ~ discussion of some of the errors introduced ~n accessory mineral separations. In Beport of the C~rMttee on Accessory Minerals for 1936-1937, ,. . , . ~ ~ fiat. research Council, Washy, 1937, p . 4-15 . These aut:tio:rs studio, in pa:cticular, the effects of crush- i3:~g, washing Id method of separation on middy frequency as. An optic crushing condition was found to exist which would Aide the largest yield of heavy minerals. Different washing procedures gate Cawing aunts of fines but no large variate ~ in -the quantity of heave- minerals or thaw relative :xequencies. Centr~fuOi~ Fish heavy ~ Maids greatly increased the yield of heaver mineral over ordinary gravity separation but ma ~0~ affect the relative

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ash; bit B -- 65 -- frequencies of the severe species in significant manned. Me moat s~g~ticant oral iations ~ n if ea,uency, however, were attributed to difference ~n crushing method used. Emetic separation does n~ effectively separate the mirror accessory minera:Ls Area the [erromagnesian minerals because of overlap of Genetic ~?ermeabi lilies. 141. Orbain, P.: Introduction ~ l' etude petrograp'n~ique et geochimique des roches argilmses. ~ . Iethodes chimes. IT . Methodes microscopiques. Act. Scient, et indust. ~ no. 499, Paris, 1937. 142. 143. TJsper~sky, N. A. :: IntroducticI1 a 1 '/tude petrog;raph;que et , . . . . . ~ getochimlque des riches argileuses. ITI. M(thodes theorize, IV. Cathodes roentgeno~aphiqlnres, V. i~ethodes mecaniqlles. Act, scient. et insist., no. DOG, Paris, 1937. On the 1~etlhods of studying argillaceous clays. Problems Soviet Gea., broth 7, p. 1051-1059, 1937 (Russ., ~ng1 .' s it. ~ .: " ' ' ' ' ' ' Notes particularly the advantages of studying clay n~line:eals in thin sections of argillaceous rocks. (G. S. A.) 144. Satan, Andra: ~d;e petro~aphique des sediments Menaces dn cretace Eerier dans le basin~de Paris meridional. Soc. Geo1. France, B . s. 5, t. 8, up. 161-170, 1938. Gr~ulometric and mineral analyses of lower Cret-aceous . . sands of the southern Paris basin, France, reveal an abundance of metamorphic minerals which indicates that the A:~norican massits of northwest Europe were the source of the material fo~ng the sediments, not- the Central rnassif no r the Votes Fountains . ~ G.S.~. 145. Versey, lI. C.: The petrography of ire Permian rocks in the southern pant of the Vale of Ed en. Q. J. G. S., vol. 95, . . p . 275-29S, 1939 . The Permian. of the Vale of Eden is characterized by an . . , anomalous breccia tacies, tone o:r~g~n and source ct which have been much debated. To throw light on this problem the heavy nerds were examined. Me heavy suite is poor in Sect es Ed is thought to have passed through more than one cyc3 e. Zircon, tourmaline' garnet, Futile, Lactase, staurolite, bard tes,

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-- 66 It B , . _ .. .. hip ersthene, intro cat ~ c Miocene, chl ori te and mi cas are 1i st ed .. [ebonite, ~gnetitea~ i~.~en~te and loca31:rpyritemakoup the opaque minerals. The frec~uenc~es are summarized in a table. Lava pebbly es. and the p,~,?roxene heavy minerals suggest that some of the material came from ~ southerly source and from the Thin sill and :Barrowdale lava nexuses in particular. The Slier sedi~nen-tary solace supplying most of the debris is believed to - be the Yoredale series. Remarks on the red color and the c=.~ntat~on of the boas conclude this paper. 146. Voelcker, I.: Schwererr neraluntersuch~g der Sa:7de der Dune von Rel~;ola~. Gec1. Deere u. B~mengew. Bd. 1, H. 1, p ~ 5-21 ~ 193? . Heavy: mineral.a~yses of the dale suds of Eelgoland, Germany. - (G. S. A. ) ~ . . . 147. von Ire, R.: A fast and thorough method for impreg;nnting : porous ro cl<: s. Econ..Geol., vol. 32, p.- 38?-3~, 1937. . 148. von Moos, Armin: Gootec~sche ~onsc:~ften und Untersuch ungemethoden der ~ckergeste~ne, Seh~reiz. Bauzei~ Bd. 111, 1938. .- . . . - . Geotechn~c properties and methods of investigation of unconsoli dart ed s ediments . ~ G. S. A. 149 . : Sedimentp'3trograpk`~sche UntersucI~ungen ~n . . . Ost-Groenland, Meddelelser on G~,/~1~, Boa. Vi de:nsk. undersol, 1 Gr;r~lana, Bd. 103, Nr. 4 (reprint) . . 150. Waldor,~P. S.: Petrography of the deposits in the road-cut;ting at Whilway. Proc. Geol. Assoc.,.,rol. 48, A. 155-759, 1937. The heavy mineral content of 25 samples taken across 112 feet of Eocene strata is described. The frequency diagram shows "breaks" i~c~tive.of shag in sedime:~ion at the two pebble beds found ~n this sequence. The strata are correlated by means of the heavy minerals wiLth the c;tand~rd Eocene section. , , :: , ,, Id, r . . . ' ~

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Exhibit B _ -- 67 - 151. Wasm~.md,,,Erich: Did Schwexminerallagerstatten der deutschen Listen (vorlautige I`~litteilu~. p. 287-300, 1938. Geol . Runds chau, Bd. 29, Occurrence and source of magnetite, i3~ehite, and gamut in the coastal sands of Germany. 152. Watanabe, Ions: Or the use of electromagnetic mineral separator in mechanical analysis of sediments. Geol. Soc. Japan, J. v. 45, p. 287-289, 1938. (G. S. A.) . . 1 53, Wayland, Bussell G.: Optical orientation ~ n elongate clasti c quartz. Am. Tour. Sci. ~ vol. 237, p. 99-109, 1939. A universal-stage study of a thin section of the St. Peter sandstone and of a balsam mount of loose grains from the Mordant sandstone shoved that the c-axis of the quartz grains tended to coincide with the long axis of the grains In the St. Peter, moreover, a de:tin~te fabric ~s evident and since the rock is Without other evidences of deforest' on, Wayland concluded that the fabric was a primary one produced by alignment of the e'~ng.ato quartz grails by the bottom currents at the time of deposit, on. Such elongate shape, that of A prolate spheroid, was probably developed as response to vectorial resistance to abrasion of the quartz. . . . 154. ~ells, A. act:.: ' Petrological applications of the low-power binocular mi croscop e . Mineral . Big., vol ~ 25 , p . 479-480 , 193g . Pebbles, ground flat on one side, are cemented to a glass slide With balsam. Ihe specimen is then camped upside down to the microscope stage and examined through the glass to which it cemented. in 155. Weyl, Richard: Brine Erz~ranatseiten der scliOeswigholsteinischen Kusten Ed ibre Regelm&~sigkeiten in derEomgrossen- und eral-verteilu~. Zs. Geschiebeforschu~' B. 13, H. 2, p, 63-76, 1937. Discusses and tabulates the regularity of mineral Id grain- size distribution in Monet- Id iron-bearir3,~ placers along the coast of Schl eswig-Holstein, Germany. (G. S. A.) 156. White, W. A.: The mineralogy of desert sands. Am. J. Sci., Errol. 237, p . 742-747, 1939.

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- - 68 - - _it B_ In order to see In what way desert sands differ ~ineralogi" cagily from ordinary wate=~-laid sediments, some ~33 samples broil the principal riddle and low latitude deserts of Africa, India, Australia, and the United States were examined. In the main the mineral composition of desert am of o:'d~r~ary water-laid sand is the same. Inceptions are calcite, which 13 ubiquitous In the desert sands, and apatite, which is preserrt in 15 of the 33 samples studied. In the larger deserts;, where eolian action is more intense, apatite ze more likely to te absent. The total number of mineral species 's likewise less in the larger deserts than ~n the smaller ones. None of the sands wed: appreciably arkos~ c. ., . 157. Winchell, A. lE. and others: Report of the Oo~;ttee on Accessory Onerous for 1936-1937, IIat. Research Council, Wash~;ton, D. O., 1937, mimeographed. This report contains bibl~ogra;bies and abstracts of the literature on accessory minerals of igneous, sedimentary a:n(1 metamorphic rocks (in C. Tester' p. 32-41; Carl Tonnes, p. 42~a37. Of Special interest and flue to students of sediments 's the contribution by Stanley Tyler and Ralph W. I`~rsden, ~A discussion of some of the errors introduced by accessory mineral separations," and a similar paper by Freak F. Grout, "Accuracy of accessory mineral methods." These authors discuss, with ample e~imental data, the problems of field sa;rap.1e, crushing and screening, sample splitting, washing out fines, mineral separations tic, dielectric, adhesion :methods, screenings;, heavy 1,qmd separations, and char cal methods), and counting (with reference to effect of shape and size on determined fr~u~cies). A section on "standard samples" anti a sw.rmd~ry of 'methods of Gaudy of accessory minerals ,' compl ete the report . 153. Winchell, Horace: - A -new micropycuometer for the determinatic)r of densities of heavy solids. Ad. chin., vol. 22, p. 805~810, 1937. ~ constant volume quar$z-&;lass p~c:~ometer i s described which has been found experimentally capable of givin, results with a probable error of about I..0 per cent, using .03 to .04 cc. of material with a specific ,gravit~y of 4.0 to 7~5, ark Weigh; on an ordinary chemical balance accurate to 0.0001 grace - Author's at stract .

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Exhibit -- 69 159. Woodland, A. W.: Metrological studies in the ~arJech Grit Series of I'rerior~ethshire. I. l`~et~orphic chafes in the r~udstones of the manganese shale group, Geol. Big., Sol. 75, p. 366-382, 1938; II. The petrography and petrology of some of the grits, p . 440-454; ITI . The development of pyrite in the grits am mudstones, 1?. 528-539. Part IT, who ch deals with ths textual and mineral composi- t~on of the grits as show in thin section and ire heavy m~:aera1 residues from crushed material, Ad Part Ill on. Ate manner of occurrence nnd tomato of the scattered crystals at primary iron sulfide, non pyrite, wi 11 be of int emit to sedimentologi st.s . Irene rocks have bee Objected to low grade metamorphism. 160. Young, John A., Jr.: 311~nerals from deed? sea cores arid surface deposits of Bermud~an calcareous sediments. Am. J. Act., vol. 237, p. 798-810, 1939 . Calcareous sediments of organic origin plus volcanic rocks provide the obvious sources for the deep-water sediments. The latter are mainly fine silts and muds though a little sand is. present in some cores. but about one per dent acid soluble. They are highly calcareous with all The insoluble minerals are quartz, feldspar, hornblende a ted biotite, pit roxene - marked by poir~tea, ~pine-l~ke pro j<3ctions - glauconite and minor accessories such as magnetite, pe3~0vskite and sphere. Zircon, spindle phillipsite, serpentine, Garnet . acatite, rock fragments and Class are also reported. , .. , , ~ (~e sp~ne-l~ke projections on the pyroxene are erroneously, In the revio~wer's opinion. interpreted as original features of this mineral. Sideman am ;~)oeglas have clsewnore - Tsche~ak's htin. Pet. Alit. Bd. 42, 1931, p. 482 - correctly attributed -this feature to solution*) The minerals are (l ~ from local sources ~ (2) authigenic, or (3) 'store". Most important of the foreign meals is quartz. ~ hidden c,uartz-bearing rock Is thought a possible source.