Click for next page ( 71


The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 70
~- 70 -- =hlbit C ~_ PROGRESS IN i~:GS AS RID TO S~7I~T'ilAIl;ON (19$9-40) Lorenz G. Straub University of ~esota, Con eapolis, hEimiesota Activity in hydre;ul~s ~ related to sediment transportation and erosion has been exceedingly great during the past year and numerous contributions have been made to the scions' tic literature on the subject. Publications have been so prolific that it is :~.~t unlikely that even a searching review of the l~te:rature w~11 rot be wi^~hotlt temporary ove: - sights of some noteworthy Works. In the brief review here presented attention is focused primarily on the work of the past year, although in a few instances reteronco is made to work of the previous year, part~cul=~- ly to s~nposi~s on the general sect of sedi~tativ~ as xclated to direr hydraulls problms. Cony Critics on the hydraulics of.sedir~=tation are of ~ rando,: naive, but studios halo boon stimulator and many of the research projects crystall~od as the robust of sovowal specially scheduled contoroncos, all of which t=~o not yot condo to com.p1~c fruition. The publications of the important international cor,[~ences, nesting the latter half of 1938, have appeared in the Past Year: _ - .* these refer to the Sixth Baltic lIydrological Cv:aforence held in Lubeck, Ge~y, August 15~20. 1938 (~-12)*. and to Fifth International Congress for Applied Mechanics held ao Forward University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Oxbridge, Massachusetts, September 12-16, 1938 (13) ~ At the Applica Mechanics Conter~ce many problorns of fluid mecl:~ies and fluid turbulence were discussed in detail, em: d the mechanics of sediment suspensions was given ;ane consideration; mile at the Baltic Conference Amorous river hydraulics problems were discussed, including strea:m-bed forms and sediment transportation by flowing cater. During the past year there Were scheduled fcDu:r contorences which brought forth numerous observations and treatments of the ,~3nera1 problem of sed~me:~t transportation by rivers and related occurrences. - Abets in parentheses refer to the numbers of the references at the clo se cat this art! cle .

OCR for page 70
,~rhib~t C - ~- -- 71 -- number of papers were presented before the Section of Flydro1~3y, America Geophysical Orion, at the meeting In 1939, April 26-29 (14), another group at the Hydraulics Conference at Iowa City, Sponsored by the Citric Eogineering Division of the Society for the Promotion of Er~gineerin~ Education ma the Iowa Tote for Hydraulic Research, June 12-15 (15), and a number of especially noteworthy papers of interest by foreign observers (16-29) were presented at the meeting of the Commission of Potamalogy, International Association of Sc~e~ntific Hydrology, hell in Washington, September 4-15-, 1939. At this same ~termtional congress there was held at the Hydrauli cs Laboratory of the Bureau of Standards a ''Round Table Discussion of the Role of Hydraulic Laboratories ire Geophysical Research" (30-37~. l One of the topics for da scuss~an at the meeting of the Commission of Potamalogy was phased as follows: "Studies of conditions under..wkdch solid material is transported in streams with movable beds, evolution of the bed fo~--fo:~tion of banks, bars and holes, laws of transportation of material' especially with regard to the speed and depth of water, the specific weight and dim - aions of materials, according to laboratory tests and direct observation of natural strews." . . Countries presenting pacers (16~29) include Be~i~, I:>e~n~, France, Gentry' Great Britain, Italy, Latvia, Netherlands, Poland, =itzerla~, United States and United Socialist Soviet Union. The broad international scope is fair index of the work being done in the field of the mechanics of sediment transportation by flowing water. ,` discussion of the content of this imposing group of papers will be let t for- another time, when, items hoped, they will be generally available as printed proceedings of the International Associate Cal of Scientific F^yd:rology. Soothe r meeting of international scope concerned esp ecially With the genera subject of sed=~t transportation b-' rivers was scheduled by the Internat~or~al Association for Hydraulic Structures Research, to hairs been held in Liege the latter part of Septenber of last year. This conference, of course, was.=laitied in consequence of the ~nte~ational tension which developed not long before the scheduled time of the meeting. lIowever, considerably activity was stimulated in the field of river hydraulics as related to sediment transportation by virtue of the scheduled p:rogr~. Symposiums were to be presented on "Bed-Load Transportation Research" and "Scour below Weirs." The modern hydraulic laboratory is taking an ever-increas~ngly important r61e in research in the various sedimentation probers. Inch has been accosted In obtaining concerted action by a publica- tion of the United States National Bureau of Standards, Hydraulic Laboratory, on current hydraulic research in the United States (38~. Here a brief resume is given of the status of current projects, a large percentage of which are concerned with sediment transportation by flowing water. Other material of importance presented in Chin publica

OCR for page 70
-- 72 -- ~hibit C _ _ lion includes the a~ouncem~t of translation of pertinent foreign articles being undertaken at the various hydraulic research institutes of the country. Patterned after the to~ of the Bureau of Standards Hydraulic Laboratory researd:h resume ~ the i~ugurati on of si rn' lar periodical s was started, one covering the research work in the hydraulic laboratories of Russia (39), and another published by the Intrnatiom1 Association for Hydraulic Structures Research (40), wash is intended to cover the field of current work in hydraulic structures research, inclusively witl: the exception of those ~n the United States arid the U.S.S.R. River Model Studies In recent years the river r.^ode1 has rapidly found an potent place in hydraulic laboratory word:. Averments are made on movable-bed river models with a view of obtaining an e-~erim~ent~ analysis of projected river control structures. Tn the United States the O. :~. finer Department, the Bureau of Recl~nastion, any the Soil Conserration Ser~rice have especially bocn conc~ed with work of this character; likewise the Tennessee Valley Authority and many university laboratories. With a-view of crystallizing the fundamentals of this type of laboratory research Ad to assist with the standardization of the present rather heterogeneous system of symbols am nomenclature the Committee on - Hydraulic Research of the ~nericax~ Society of Civil :Rng~neers is pre,~ar- ing a 'laboratory Meal for :86~drau~ic .~.Iode! Studies," now in a preliminary form ~41~. Icicles have appeared both in this country and abroad concerned particularly with the 1indtations of model expe~me~al wo=. Thus ~n a paper on "Ptiver Physics laboratories of Grope and America" (42) a review is presented of the river Eden e:~periments recent1~- performed ~n } - ope ariL Arid nnd their significance. :Discussic'n i s g' ven of the tidal experiments on smoked of the Severe River, Gee experiments on models of the Abe, the Rhine, and experiments on models of the Mississippi, rivers of India, and others. the results of recent investigations at hydraulic laboratories in Ge~ny (43) are discussed, giving consideration to sedi~nm;t transportation, levee construction, and the like. The 1'mitations of applicability of the results obtained from raved model studios have been discussed both in tI:Lis country and abroad (44-49~. Questions for discussion involved the distortion of models with reference to depth, the use of granular material in models with lower specific ~,ra~ty than the s=d fouled in actual rivers, and many other points of interest. With the v=' ous types of disto:ction Enrolled, it ~s well pointed out that rather than referring to "si:.~ilarity" in

OCR for page 70
Alibi ~ C - models probably "correspondi~" accurre:aces ~vould be more appropr~ate. The verification of model occurrences by comparing to the prototype have been all too infreo.,ueat, but some studies of this character ails now being made. Thus, ~t has been found that the scour below a heir on the upper Rhine Biver, which had keen designed Etch the aid Qua experimental a:rnlys~s some ten years ago, showed a good agreement of the present condition in velure Its those observed in the.rivex ~ode1 (5O). Other special studies win the use of models include sedimentation at the confluence of rivers (51) ~ studies of meats of model strew (52), the resistance to fro'' of water along; ~ tortuous stretch of river and in a small-sca;Le model of the 5~T~ {53), and the formation of sand bans and sand ripples Pith obstruction (piers and sills), bends and contraction works (54~. Descriptions have been presented of net river hydraulic laboratories (55) including what is called the first river bydraul~c laboratory of Cbina (56~. Laboratory Studies of Bed-Load ~nt1 __ _ _ __ Sus~ded-Load \ovement by Flowi:n~ Water ,, . ~___ Some studies are in progress under idealized conditions of bee-load fran~portat~on by flowing water. ~ recent nap er on tb; s subject describes laboratory investigation of the probl=s of flue fraction Id tr~spor- tat~on (57~. Another paper related to this general problem describes e~er~;ental studies of the transportation of sand and gra~rei in alpine 11ne- (58) ~ Studies made abroad are reported, ~ndica-tir~ the dependence of bed-load movement upon form of: Brain and te:.;pe~ature (therefore viscosity) of the water (59~. ~ strut ~ result of this investigation is the great increase in sedi'~entar`y load with decrease in viscosity of the wate:e, thus ind~catix~ that turbulence plays ~ important role in the mechanics of bed-10ad movement. i3~pe:rim.~ental studies ~ve been made of the velocity of water and its orosiYe~ess in effect erosion process (6O) . Viscosity, of course, plays an important :cole in the movement of sedimentary Aerial by suspension. Boils practical Ad idealized discus- sions have been presented recently on this g;e:ueral sub ject. Papers have been given on suspended-load control and the problem of channel stab' lizatio3a ~ 61), the hydrod~ical theory of the viscosity ~ f suspen- s~ns (62), the motion of o~31indri~ particles in viscous flow (63), and a discussion of the flow of plastic am pseudo~plastic materials as Compared with and in contrast to viscous flow (64~. Tne ~ of Turbulence as Rented to ~ ~ ~ _ Sediment Tr~portat~on ~ F10wi~ Water The theory of fluid turbulence has developed rapidly the last several years and is now providing a possible exp1~ation and rational

OCR for page 70
-- 74 -- Bit C ~_ e~lamliontor the meccas of sediment transportation. Although much ~$ to be accomplished in this Modern field of thouglit, several well-conceived. disc~ssiox~ have been presented: both ire this country and abroad. Thus' using the. kinetic theory of gases as a basis j differential equations have been developed for the suspends load of a aired in general' in a two-dimensional homogeneous streets, Id finally in a tu~pu~ent stream (65), Application Q. start principles ~d turbulent Research to bed-load movement as well -as to suspended load indicates that a mode general theory Will eventually be developed with this approach ~ 66-69 ~ . It in now generally recognized that ~ theory; of sediment trans- portation by flowing water canon be complete without consideration of fluid turbulence. ~ general theory, therefore, can become finite com3?1ex~ Various approaches to tile problan are now being proposed; come of them consider only bulk factors, others Bra the mechanic of internal turbulence in scme detail. Tho practicing engineer prefers to deal With bulk factors provided they give reasonably reliable results. A mmber of checks have been made on the mono rational analysis involving consideration. of mechanism of internal turbulenes, and it As; quite . . . . .. . ... likely that a usable procedure will be developed as more data become available, Various approaches are we11 presented by ~ for of American and foreign papers which halve appoorod in taco course of the pest ycccr (70-79). . . P`ivers River :Estuar~as Id Bach ~rcs~on ; tDiSCUSsioOS at the be~=c:r of rivers with rarti collar reference to their sedimental, charact~istic,s have been frequent. A study of the water a~ sediment movement in serpentined river stretches was presented (80) and general fundamental principles for the regulation~=d -improvement of an alluvial river (81). Ol;hear papers include a study of solid matter discharge in rivers With sandy beds (82) with particular reference to the Don River, also the Whine in Holland (83), the F=is River in centre;L Sweden (84), the Yellow Diver of Bra (85), and others. A study of materi~.S in su;pens~Gn tn the Mississippi River (86) and discussion regarding the erect of cut-offs ~n the lower river upon its regimen have appeared (87~90). Other studies include salt problems of I~=iaQ 3Orrigatio:n Strict as Erected by completion of Boulder Dam (91), the depos:~tion of sediment in rese:r~roirs (92), a~ the functions of - Debris dams ~ 93 ~ . . . . . . ... . . Hydraulic model studies hairs been made of harbor problems (94-95) and the influence of sedi::.:ent neon in a tided river (96~; other tidal model experiments were in connection with the R~oon River and the mouth arms of the Irawadi Ever delta (gal. i- .. . .

OCR for page 70
gambit ~ _ Me problem of beach oros~o:~ has been discussed from the v~ew- point of the engineer (-98~, giving a short geological, hydrographic class fication of the coast of the U. S. A., also the deve~opme~Lt and ~stalla- t~on of laboratory facilities for the investigation of evade tanks on beaches (99~. Studies have been Made re~;ardi~ the inclination of the strand alo~ sandy beach shores (100-101), ~;ivin,~ co=~derat~on to the principal direction of the wind Id the mean grain size of to-, mtteria1 to~ng the strand. Other studies were trade of erosion and sedimenta- t~or~, that is, rise and f~1 of sand along the Ligurian coast (102~. Miscellaneous Studies, Mechanical Analysis of Sediment ~ ~. u ~_ . ~. ~. I especially co~rohens~ve treatment of the general subject of sedimentation was presented as ~ symposium (103~; included are sections on transportation of detritus by bang; water, effect of transportation on sediment particles, et cetera. Another treatise on sedimentation appearing in 1939 presonts a cc~prehe~as~ve discussion of the sources of sediment (104), the onviro~ntal [actors that influence their productions transportation and deposition, et cetera. Other reports include the measui:.ement of sediment discharge e (105), observations of the influence of forest upon the soil am detritus fo~tion (106), silt problem of tlie western part of the United States (107), am the report of the Committee on Dynamics of Streams of the Inert can Geophysical Union conk an extensive bibliography covering a two-year period of literature appearing in various languages (1Q8), referring in part to (a) investigations of regimen of stirrers and bed load studies, (b) mechenias of sedimentation; suspended load of rivers; de:~sity currents; sedimentation tn reservoirs, and (c) miscellaneous river hydraulic studies i nvol~i~ sea, mentati on p roblem$ . A number of discussions Gaffe appeared regarding the classification and graphical representation of the ~cnechan~cal composition of sedimentary radial ~ lO9-112 ~ . Concorde Co_ The transportation of solid materials by moving fluid forms one of the most complex fields of hydraulic research. q:hus, the vagaries in the behavior of rivers have long been and still are baffling to the most careful observers. The river hydraulic laboratory is now aiding materially in the closer observation of sediment transportation phenomena, for here some of the variables ca:a be controlled arid the observations made under more or less idealized conditions. The various co~l~cti~ statements which have appeared from time to time in the past emphasize the importance of the careful observation

OCR for page 70
-- 76 -- _nibit C in nature ~:a order to establish merge definitely the physical facts and provide ~ finger basis for a mathematical approach. certainly, detritus motion is not yet clarified, either in its mechanics or in its practic~J. aspects. However, the prober is further complicated by the difficulty of ma;ki~ robe field observations. Innumerable types of sediment traps have variously been dew sed for making observations of the transportation of material Plow the strums: beds end others for determi:?.- in;g Mounts nod character of the ~ter~a:L transported in suspension. Studies are now in progress to ascertain the relative merits of these various devices. The internal turbulence of a stream is now becoming generally recognized as of importance in the suspended load distribution. Thus, the theory of turbulence is now being tal:en into account in the general theory of sediment transportation. This increases the complexity of the analysis but should teed to focal points, eventually providing a better concept of the nature of the transportation phenomena. Mthc~gh this notion has been recently,,? well crystallized for the part of the strew some distance above the bed, the nech~is~n of turbulence is still very bluely understood in the 'mediate region of the strew bed. Analytical treatments have bed proposed regarding; the forces on the ~ndi~dual stream bed particle at impending ~:Lot~on. This latter problem must be further studied in the light of information regarding the laninar film boundary layer. The :~ath~tical fonnulat ~ on of many localized phenomena of bod- load rnove~nent returns unaccompl' shed. :~3ed movement is recognized to occur variously as a relative!'; smoothly moving sheet in which individual particles progress un~for~nly with Mite ~perceq?tible pulsations, as ripples in batch ~.ndividue1 particles come to rest completely pe.iodi~ cally, as large sand or g~ave1 bars ~cli progressively move much after the fashion of sand dunes and as ~ combination or inte=~cdinto condition of these Perry typos of motion. The condition also exists in which ~ pa:r~icular type of form.atio n robins fixed <~d the sand progresses through the foundation Mtho'.:t ch~gi~ the location of the latter. Some of these phenomena have bash recognized as stable conditions reproducible under laboratory control =~ yet their o-~lar`ation is still vague. Certainly, definite progress Is being made. The introducta on of dimensionless parameters has variously bee:a suggested ~ a means of defining sediment transportation occurrences, at least under idealized conditions. It is q~te-possitIe that by such maws the physical [actors influenc~:~; the various types of movement can be identified. Some progress has been show by this method of attach Although the theory Id laboratory hare been used as tools in the solution of sed~- ment transportaticI1 problems, it is quite important ~Q recognize that much observational work remains to be accomplished on rivers ther:sel~res for the complete understanding of the sediment transportation problems.

OCR for page 70
- ~ -- 7 ~ -- Inhibit C _ , Seifert, Rudolf. Methodik fir die Messung von Geschiebe-, Sink- und Schwebestoffneng;en, I~up~bericht 19 , 10 pp ., VI Baltische Hydro l ogi s che Konf er ens, 1 9 38 . 2, I3rk, Walter. ~ethodik fir die ~essung von GLescl~iebe-, Sink- used Schwebestof~engen, Bericht 19 B (Germany), 16 pp., ibid. 3. Le~pik, ~on. lldethodik fur die Mess von Geschiebe-, Sink- und Schwebestof~engen, Bericht 19 C ~ ;E3;thonia), 15 pp., ibid. 4. K~etax~owicz, Zb~gmew. Untersu~ungsmethoden dex S~nkstofibewegung in den Plilssen Sudpolens, Bericht 19 D (Poland), 19 pp`, ibid. 5. Prat je, Otto. Die Mat erialwanderung an den Ei~sten der Ostsee und ibre Berechn~g nach der Fo~l von Ix';unch-Petersen' ~;pt- bericht 11, 8 pp., ilbid. 6. Was~n~d, ;Brich. Orenzen der Bsrechnung gesteinstransportierender Ktafte an der deutschen Ostsee~ste, Bericht 11 A (Ge=}any), 11 pp ., ~bi d. 7. Leppik, ~on. Zur Frage der Sinkstoff- ux~d ~schiebe~ ng an ~deeresk:sten. Bericht 11 B (Esthonia), 10 pp., ibid. 8. K~naps, B. P~fu~ der }Po~1 von Prof. Munch-Petersen ~ber ~ter~al- wanderung a:n der lettischen Ku-ste, :Beri cht 11 C (Latria3, 60 pp., ibid. 9. Bevel~s, Paul~s. b~terialwanderung an der lettischen Kuste, Bericht 11 D (Latvia>, 30 pp., ibid. 10. :~)lusk~, Ste Z~um Problem der Wanderung von Kuste~aterial an der polui$chen Ostseek~ste, Bericht ll E (Poland), 14 pp., ib~d. ll. Rozankowski, A. D'e I(u$te an der We~chselmundung, llitteilung zu 14 (Poland), 2Spp., ~b~d. 12. L~db~e, J. T. Stud~e~3L uber Jleeresablageru~gen in den danischen Gewassern, Bericht 19 ~ (I)enmq~, 5 pp., nb'4,

OCR for page 70
-- 78 -- 13. Proceedings of the Fifth International Congress for Applied Inhibit C . _ ._ ~ 7;lech=~cs, John Wiley tc Sons, Inc., New York, 748 pp., 1939. 14. Transactions, American Geophysical Union, National llesearcl:` Council, Part IV, 741 pp.' AllguSt 1939. 15 . Proceedings of Hydrauli cs Conference. Bull etin GO, ITnivers~ty of Towa Studies in engineering, 247 pp., starch 1940. 16. White, C. M. '~e ::nfluence of Transported Solids upon Rivers. British Research, Question 3, Report 1, Proceedings of International Association for Scientific Hydrology, 23 pp., Gauth;~Vi1lars, Paris, 1939 (~n page proof: publ~catio}: del ayes by international confli ct ~ . 17. Bonnet, L., ala To-, T. }testis sur nodes conduit pour up seuil de fleuve maritime, Question 5, Report 2, 13 pp., ibid. 18. I~Iatakiewicz, M. tier GescI~ebebewe~g, Question 3, Report 3, 15 pp., ibid. 19. Schaank, 13. 1~. :~. He Transportation oft Sand in Divers, Question 3, Report 4, 17 Ply, itia. 20. Tison, L. J. Erosion du fond des cours d'eau, Question 3, Report 5, 14 pp., ibid, 21. Glangeaud, L. Le mouveme:nt des students et la formation des banes, sculls et moll~lles dans la heroine et ltestua~re de la Gironde, Question 3, Report 6, 14 pi., ibid. 22. Debaki, ~z~mie=. DB:r Geschiebetrisb Am Flussbette der Wisla, QUQS1iOIL 3, Report 7, 8 pp., ibid. 23. Seifert . Untersuchungen uber der Gesctiebe~hrung von Wasserlauten mat boweglichem Bett, besonders uber die Austild~ der :Flussohle in Sa:ndbar~ken und Kolken: ~sa~enhnng des Geschiobetriets mit den Pliesageschwind~gkeit, der Wassertiefe, dam ~nheit~ewicht und der Kox~gr~sse des Geschiebes, nac:b Laboratoriumsversuchen und Boobachtun~gen, Question 3, Report &, 14pp., ibid. 24, Van V - n, A. Rec3ierches geo-hyd~iogiques dans 1e Pas-de-Calais, Question 3, Report 9, 12 pp., ~bid. 25. ~eyer-Pete~r, :E:. Das Profile dor Gsschiebe~lh~ng Nat~irlicher Flusse, Question 3, Report 10, 25 pp., ibid.

OCR for page 70
rho; bit C a,ue. , . . _ -- 79 __ 26. Vitols, A,lfreds. Beitrag our Losing des Problems der Geschiebebewe- gu:~' Question 3' Report 11, 24 pp., ibid. 27 . Conti, Luciamo . Traspc~rto solido den corsi d'acqua ri Chicano di alcune nozioni ge::erall, Questic'n 3, Report 12, 14 pp., ibid. 28. Velikanov, A. A. Formation of Sand Ripples on the Strew Bottom, Question 3, Report 13, 17 pp., ibid. 29. Straub, I,or~z G. Sediment Transportation by givers, Question 3, ibi d. 30. Knapp, P`. T.. Density Currents, Topic l(b), P`ound-Table D~s~ssion on Role of Hydraulic Laboratories in Geophysical Research, Association of Scientific Hydrology 3!deeti~ in TYashi~ton, 8 mimeographed pp., 19139 (Publication delayed by '~ter~on- a:l conflicts . 51. Whittield, C. J. Wind Erosion, ~es' etc., Topic 7(a), 8 mimeo- graphe~pp., ibid. 32. Cook, Howard L. Fro sion of the Soil by Water, Topic 7tb), 10 mi meograp3hed Up . ~ ibid . 33, Happ, Stafford C. Strew and Va;110y :Erosion and Deposition, Topic 7(c), 5 m~me~raphed pp., ibid. 34. Lymph, Jr., A. M. Silting of P`eservoirs, Topic 7(a), ~ ~neo- graphed Up ., ibid. 35. Johnson, Joe W. Transportation of Sediment by Strums: Bed Load, Topic 8(a3, 9 mimeographed pp., ibid. 36. Rouse, Hunter. Lairs of Tr~pportat~on of Sediment by Streams: Suspended Iliad, Topic 8~), 7 mimeographed pp., ibid. 37. B~bei~, W. C. Settling Velocity ~d the Orientation of Sedi- mentar~r Particles, Topic 9, 8 mimeographed ply, ibid. 38. Current lIydraulic Laboratory Research in United States, 1;~. S. National Bureau of Standards, ITydraulic Laboratory Bulletin 7, Series A, 146 pp., T=uaxy 1939. 39. Exchange of Hydrotec~ical Research Results, Bulletin No. 7, USE Commission f03r E2:cha~;e I By~aulic Oratories Research Results, 35 pp., Lea~:ngrad, 1936

OCR for page 70
-- 80 - ~kbibit C _ 40. Iouiende U~tar~uchun~an 1~ ~asserbau11cbes ~ e ~uchswesen' Bulletin II' ioternatio~1 Association for B9dredlie Structures Research' IS? >~' lgS8 ~ 41. Laboratory Manual for B9drsulic Model Studies, Committee on B~d~aulic pebea~ob, *Sheridan Society of Civil E~ineera' 94 mimac~taphed he'd; lam 42. BOse# N" K. 81~8r Pb78108 Iabo~atorica in Europe and America, ~ Proc. ~!. Irate Sdi. Indis' >. 4, pp. 477 ~ ~` lOS8 45. Win H. Wasse~bauliche For bedbug' Deutechs Washers, No. 6 pp" 846^855, lgSg. 44. ThoEpson, Paul W' Hydraulic Gael Tasting in the Spotlights - Proceedings of B'drauIics Couiers~oe' Bulletin Nb@ 00, 00i~8r- aity of Iowa Studies in E4~ineeri~' pp. 21-50, ~rcb lg40 . . . . . 45. Thomphon, Paul W; The Use and Tr~stwortbiness of _ ll~scaIe ' Hydraulio ~ d81~, Civil EA~inoer1~, v" 8' pp. 855-257, 1958 46. Vogel' Bdibert D. B9drsulic ~dddls-~GeometricaI or Distorted ~ Pro6~ddin~s of Byd~auties Coh~erenee' Bu11et1n ~0@. 80' . . . . UniverSity of Iowa Studies in ~b~ineeri~# pp. 175-177' ~rcb lg40 47. Einstein, R. i., ~ llez, Bob,; ~ er die ~ ichkeit bet flussbaulicben ~bJellversudben' Schwe1~. Arch. ang8W@ Missy Tachn", v. 5, pp. 2B6~359, lags 48. Tagger, Cbaries. ~ er die ~ idb~1t bet flusstaulichan ~bJell- versuchea# Waeserkraft and Wasserwirtschaft, No. 25/24, pp~ S6g-B70~ lgS9 49. InElis# 0" C. The Use of Bela fog tiuoldati~ Flog P bbldms Bated oh E~parisace Gained in Carrying out Yodel ~iper1- ments at the~ro-~ic Research Station' Pooped Mock ~t. Inst" Sci ~ I~a' v. 4' ppe 419-45g ~ 1058 50. Rehbop~, Th. ~bdelTvaraucbe ~ ar KolLbildu~; und Scat tzenCestal- ~ bet den Doppelechutzen~Nehren ~ g-Sch~orstadt in Hocbrbein und glib am ~bro, Baui~enieur; No. 11/12, pp. 137-~41' lgS9 51. fifth Annusl Deport of Gpeolal Committee on Hydrsulie Research' Civil ~ inhering, v. 9' No@ 2, pp. 109-lIO' lg59

OCR for page 70
Exhibit C -- 81 -- 5Z. Tiffany, Jr., Joseph B., and Nelson, George A. Studies of Meander- ing of Idodel-Streams, Transactions, A:nerican Geophysical Union, Part I, pp. 644-649 ~ 1939. 53. Allen, Jack. The Resistance of Floor of hater along; a Tortuous Stretch of River and in a Scale Model of the Masse, J. Instn. Civ ~ Engrs. ~ v. 11 ~ No ~ 4 ~ 115-132 ~ 1959 ~ 54. Bison, L. J. Banes et sable et ripple-m~rks dans les cours d ' eau, Ann . Soc . Sci . Bruxelles, Ser . II 59, pp . 41-51, 1939 . 55. St. Anthony Falls Hydraulic I.aboratory, Minneapolis, Engineering, v. 147 ~ Up ~ 609-612' ~ 939 ~ 56. Measles. Das erste ~asserbaulabora~orium Chi~as, Bautec~ik, v. ~ 7, pp ~ 305-307, 1930. 57. Chafing, Y. L. Laboratory Investigations if Flume Traction and Transportation,Proceedings, American Society of Civil Engineers, v. 104, pp. 1246-1284, 1939 58. Howard, G. W. T:ransportat~on of Sand sold gravel in a :Eour-Inch Pipes Pr6;)ceed~ngs' America Society of Civil Engineers, v. 104, pp. 1334-13*8, 1939. 59. Eo -Yang. Abha~glceit der Geschiebebe~vegung von der I;or~- fo~ und der T=peratur, Mitt. Preuss, Versuchsanst. fur Wasser-, Erd- und Schif~bau, v. 37, 43 pp., 19390 60. Diseker, lS. G. Mothod of Measuring Runoff Velocity as Related to Soil \Iove~neut between Terraces, ~=c. long., v. 20, No . 5, Up . 105-196, 1939. 61. Lone, E. W. Suspended-Load Co~tro1 and the Problem of Chawel Stabilization, Proceeds As of Hydraulics ~ Conference, Bulletin 20. Un~rsity of Iowa Studies ~n Enginec3ri~;, pp. 193-~01, torch lg40 . 62. Guth, Eugene. On the lI~r`~rod~n~aInical Theory of tile Viscosity of Suspensions ~ Proceedings, ~1 'lath I}~t9rnatiollal Congress of Applied l/lec~anics, pp. 448-4555 1939. 63. Binder, B. C. liotion of cylindrical particles in viscous flow, Jou~n~1 of Applied Phys cs, v. 10, No. 10, pp. 711-713, 1939. 64. Babbitt, Harold En, and C31dv;re71, David Ilo La~inar Flov; of Sludges ire pipes Lit ~ ; coal fete to <~e~-a~ * Sued, University of Ill oil s -~e~i;~-nt =/~ tion Bulletin Serf es No. 319 ~ v. X~11 ~ No ~ 12 ~ 60 pp ~ ~ 1939 ~

OCR for page 70
-- 82 -- Exhibit C __ _ . . ~ 65. Velikanov, M. 4. Statistical Theory of Silt Notion, t.~eteorol. i Gidrol., v. 4, No . 9/10 , pp . lp7-~l , 1938. ~ . . . . .. 66. (;hislds, A. Application of S~mil~arity Principles and Turbule~:;ce Research to Bed-~oad Covet, translation of chapters Prom wendung der Achulichkeiti-n~ech~ilk und der I - bulenz- .. forschung auf die Gesch~ebebewegu~g, 42 pp., Berlin, 1936. 67. Lane, :E. I. ~ and ~linske, A. A. Me Relation of Suspended to Bed t;bter~a~ In Rivers, Transactions, American Geophysical Union, Part Id, pp. 637-641, 1939. . . . . . . . ~ 68. ~linske, A. A. Bela ti ~ of the Statistical Theory of Tu:rbu~ence to Dray, Proceedings, American Society of Civil Engineers, v. 65, No. 8, Part; 1, pp. 1387-1406, 1939. . . . . . . . 69. House, Hunter. km Analysis of Sediment Trans~ortatio:a In the Light ,, of Fluid lbrbul~ce, Sedimentation Division, J. S. Soil Conservation Service, California Institute of Technology, SCS-~-2t, 25 mimeographed pp., lg39. ~. . . 70. Vitols, Alfreds. Wine verallgemeinerte Hydraulik (Ps~'n~:o Hydra~k) ads 7~erk~eug zur Lost des Problems der Geschiebebewegung Ad a;~:derer Probleme den G=enge-Xydraul~<, lhFasserkr=t Ad Wasserwirtschaft, No. il;/i-2, pp. 122-135, 1959 ~ ~, . . . 71.; Hayurni, S~itir'S. Hydrological Studies on The Yangtze Raven, China. IT. ~ Theory of Silt Transportation by Running Water, ~ . thy ghai ' Inst., Sec. I 1 , pp . 175-198 , 1938 . 72. Straub, Lorenz G. ' Approaches to Bale Study of the mechanics of Bed Movement, :~'oceedings of Hydraulics Coherence, Bulletin 20, 173~iversity~ of Iowa Studies in Eng~;earir~, pp. 178-192, March 1940. . . . 73. Rouse, hunter. Trivia for Similarity in the Transportation of Sediment, Proceedings of ty~aul~cs Conference, Bulletin 20, UTni~rersit~r of town Studies in `~iseri~, pp. 33~49, Arch 1 9~ . .. . . . . 74.- Lacey, Gerald. The FloW of Water In Alluvial Channels, Proc. Nat. Inst. Sci. India, v. 4, :pp. 411 - 418 ? 1938. 75. Paxmann, W. Plussbau in Peoria und Praxes, Bautec~mik, No. ID, 76. Gr~tith, W. M. pp. 421~424, 1959. .. .. . . . A Theory of Silt Transportati~h, Proceedings, American Society of Cull Engineers, V. 104, pp. 1733-1748, 1939.

OCR for page 70
Exhibit C -- 83 -- . . , 77. SperliDg. Betrachtu~en uber die Gas chiebobowegu~g Am fliesse~den Passer, Pr. Bautechnik, No. 47/48, pp. 5963-601' 1939. 78. Bison, L. J. De ~ 'truce du transport des materisux solides dans un cours d'eau our la valeur du coefficient dit de =~go SitQ, Bull stir 22, Intornationa1 Association for Scientific Hydrology, Part 1, pp . 88-92, 1938 . 79. TY'llemin, M. Du deb' t solide des cou:~s d'eau, International ~soc~ation for Sciontific Eyd~log,'-, Bulletin P`o. 22, Part 1, pp. 55-73, 193~3. ~ . 80. ~Vit~n, H. 17asse3~- und Geschiebobeweg~ ~n gakrur=ten Fluss treclren, Zeitschrift des lTere~nes deutscher Ingenieure, v. 83, pp. 841-8a=2, 1959. 81. Fro sin~, P. Cr~teri general) per ~a r~olarizzaz~one e util~zzazione di un corso d'acqua di pianura--a und cove part~culare, ~ali dei lavori Pubbl~ci, v. 76, 3Io. 4, pp. 295-31 5, 1938. 82. - Semikole~ov, A. S. About study of Sol~d. ~scharge in the Rivers with ~dy Beds, ~eteorol. i Gidrol*, v-4, No. 9/10, pp. 142-155, 1938. 83. Schasnk' E. M. E. D~term~nation du debit sol~de des courants. I3.-- Transport de sable par le courant dans 1~ partie sup e:'ieure des en~branch~mts neeriandais dn 12hin, Inter nationa1 ~sociation fo:r Scientific T7ydrolog~r, Bullet~n No . 22 ~ Paxt 1, pp . 42-52 ~ 1938 ~ HJulst~m, Filip. ~ia load of tne Ri~r ;Ey=:s in Central Sweden, Intornational lLssoc~at~on [Qr Scicntific E:rd;rolo`gy, }3u11etinI~To. 22, Part 1, pp. 74~2, 1938. 85. Todd, 0. J-., a~id ELlassen, S. The Tellow R~ver Problem, ]?ro ceedingsj ~mericaxl Society of Civil ~gineers, V. 6a=, pp, 1921-1991, 1938. 86. Study of ~qter,als ~n Su~pension, ~ssissipp~ River, 11. S. Water~ys E~periment Station Tec}=i~cal-~oraDdun No. 122-l, 27pp., 193g. 87. ~ss~ss~pp~ River Navigation and F1ood Co:~$rol Out-ofts fron: TLiOUth of ~kansas P<~ver to An~;ola, La., re:?rint fro~n C~ril ~gi2:eering, pp. 725-829, 1Q38, Gorps~ of 13~;ineers, I':issis~ . s~ppi River C)~mission, 1939.

OCR for page 70
-- (34 -- Exhibit C 88. I:ississippt Diver Cutoffs Effective, ~r~:neertng News-~ecord, v. 123, No . 5, Up . 44-4~ ~ 1939 . 89. Fergu$on, IIarleyB. Flood Controlof the~ississippi Fiver, nisi ~ Engineering ~ v. 9, No . 6 ~ pp . 353-354, 1939 . 90. Study of b~ter~a:L:; in Transport Passes of ~ss~ssipp.i River, U. S. Engineer Office, :First New Gleam District & J. S. TYaterwa`~ pennant Station Technical lde~i~r~nd~ur.~ No. l58~1, 32 pp., 3939. 91. Dowd, M. J. It, Problems of ]:mper~al Irrigation District as Affected by Completion of Boulder Dam, Ci=1 ~i;neering, v. 9, No. 10, pp. 609-611, 1939 . 93. Bircher, E. Die Yerl~du~ der Staubecken und Stauh~lt~A~,e~ Con Eratt-werk=, Passer- Id Energiewirtschaft, v. ED, pp . 135-142, ~ 938. 93. Eenyon, Jr., :E. C. The Buncos of Debri$-Dams arid the Loss of Reservoir-~acityr through Silt' no, T;ransact:. ons, I~`eri- can Geophysical Union, Part 1, pp. 16-20, 3939. 94. Ihompso:rt, P. Yi. Model Tests Solve Harbor Problem, Engineering News-Record, v. 123, No . 7, pp a 63-65 ~ 1039 ~ 95. Model Study of Outer bar, U. S. \Yaterways liXpeximent Station Hydraulics Bulletin, v. 2, No. 3, pp. 1-5, 1939. 96. Hens en, W. Der Influx der lSrdumdrehung auf Tide,lusse in der Natur und im Novell, Bautec~ik, No. 21, pp. 235~283, 1939. 97. Tidal Models, ~gineer'ng, v. 1AL7, pa;, 43~3-440, 1939. 98, Brown, Earl I. Beach Erosion Studies, Proceedings, Ame~icarr Society of Civil D3ginoors' v. 6S, pp. 69-91, 1939. 99. Brown, I:. J. Studies of Beach Erosion, ~ginerar~ng tJo~rs-Reco:ed, v. 24, pp. 299-504, Part 1, 1938. 100. Toyohara, Yoshikazu. on the Inclinatic:n of the Strand along Sandy Sea-Shore, I.. Proc. Imp. Acad. lap., v. 14, pp. 320-324, 19~3. 101. Toyohara, Yosh~kazu. On the Inclination of the E;tr~d along a Sander Sea-Shore, II. Proc. IIDP. Acad. Jap., v. 15, pp. 13-163 ~ 1939 .

OCR for page 70
Exhibit ~ - - ~ - 85 -- 102. Ascari, LI., Baccino, L., and ~u'~eti, G. Le :;piagge delta Riviera Share, Consiglio blaze d. ric~xche; cc':~Hnit. p,,la geogr~, correct. p. ingegn. B~cerche sulle var~azioni d. spiagge ., I ., VI, 329 pp., Ron~e, 1937 . 103. Trask, Parker I)., editor; several co-authors. Recent Marine Sediment s, s~m~posimm by Imbibers of Committee on Sedimenta- tion, N. R. O., Amorican Association 0 Petroleum Goono- gists, ~6pp., 1939. 104. Twanhotel, W. E. Principles of Sedimentation, McGraw-Mll Book Co., New York, 610 pp., 1939. 105. Frolow, M. W. Quelqus mesures du debit solids, International Association for Scientific Hydrology, Bulletin No. 22, Part 1, pp. 83-8?, 1958. 106. Strele, Georg. Uber den Schuss des Waldes auf die Bodenbindung und Geschiebebildu~,~ Deutscher Wasserwirtschatt, No. 9, pp. 385-39*, ~ 939 . lO7. Stevens, J* C. Silt problems of the W - t, Transactions, Mexican Geophysical tJ:~on, Part 1, pp. 2~-32, 1939. 308. Straub, Lorenz G. Report off Committee on Dynamics of Streams, 1938-S9, Transactidus, icecap Geophysical Union, Part If, pp ~ 555-579, ~ 939 109. Cowbell, I?ra~l: B. Graphics] Representation of the I,techanic~ Analyses of Soils, Transactions, American Society of Civil Engineers, Ire 104, pi . 150-155, 1939 ~ 110. Umber, Y7. C. Graphic P`esentation and Statistical Analysis of Sedimentary llama, Recent Bane Sediments, American Association of Petroleum Geologists, pp. 058-591, Tulsa, 01~1 Moms, 1939 . 111. Otto, George H. A Modified [ogar~thmic Probability- Graph for the I:nterpretat~ on of ~echani c al Atolls es of Sediment s, Journal cf Sed~mentar~y Petrology, v. 9, No. 2, pa. 62-76, 1939. 112. Otto, George lI.,and Rouse, Hunter. Wind-Tu~el Classifier for Sand and Silt, Civil Engineering, v. 9' No. 7, pp. 414~15, 1939.