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- 10 - E;ECE1:TLY PUI3LISHED PAPERS G~>T~AL Dapples? E. C., The effect of macro-organisms upon near-s,~-ore marine sed`- ments, Jour. Sed. Petrology, Carol . 12, pp . 11tS~126, 19L~2. Diet z, R. S., nerd, K. GO and Shepard, Francis P. , Phosphorite deposits or the sea floor off Southern California, Geol. Soc. Abner., Eu:~1., Roil. 53, up. Sl5~L~S, ' 942. Dunbar, T`,'<~. J., Marine macroplan~on from the Canadian eastern Arctic, II, 'edusae, Siphonophora, Ctenophora, Pteropoda and Chaetognatha, Canadian Jour. Bes., Sec . A, Zool. Sci., Carol. 20, pp. 7:1-77, :L9l~2. Goldring7 inured and Flower, Rousseau H., Restudy of the Schoharie and Esopus formation in New York State, o'er. dour. Sci., trot. 2L,0, pp. 673-69l~, 19L, 2 @ Gunter, Gabon, Of~atts Bayou, adlocality with recurrent summer mortality of latrine organisms, Abler. '.l~dland Nat., Carol. 2S, pp. 631-633, 1942. Fiadding, Assar, The Pre-~uaternary rocks of Sweden, VI, Reef limestone, ppe 1-737, 7~.leddelanden Fran Lands Geologisk-~;ineraJogiska Institution, Lungs Univers i tats irsskrift, N. F., Avd. 2, ted. 37, nr. 10, 19L~1. (Reviewed by fir. X. I~renhofel, Jour. Sed. Petrology,, vol. 12, pp. 139- ~ 540, 1C>l~2; . Harvey, H. ~d'"'i., Production of life in the sea, Biol. Reviews Cambridge Phil. Soc., Carol. 17, pp. 221-~6, ~Pl'2. Imlay, Ralph t`~, Evidence for Upper Jurassic landmass ~ eastern L-e~ico, Bull . Amber . As soc . Petrol. Geol., Crop . 27, pp . 52L'-53S, 19L~3 . . . . Lindm<3n, Raymond L., The trophic-dynam~ic aspect of ecology. Ecology, vol. 23, pp. 399~Lr1S, 1942. Lowenstam, Heinz As, Facies relation and origin of some Fiag;ara:~ coverts, (abet. ~ . Geoff . Soc. Amer., Bull ., trot. 53, pp . 1605-l 806, 19L~2. I.owen~ta~, Heinz A., Geo10 OCR for page 10
- 11 - Payne, Thomas G., Stratigraphica~ analysis arid en~rironmenta:l recons~,ruction, Bull. Amer. Assoc. Petrol. Geol., vol. 26, pp. 1697-1770, 19L~2. Pears e, A. S., hump, H. J. and Chart on, G. 7.~., Ecology of sand beaches at Beaufort, IT. CO, Scold. felon., vol. 12, pp. 135-190, 1942. The sand beach at Beautort, North Carolina, was studied for two summers, specimens being taken with many kinds of gear. T.~Iarine littoral sands at Beautort swarm with plant and animal life. Many species show peculiar adaptations for existence in a medium that is continua:~ly rearranged, t~r.at is deficient in oxygen and contains much CO2. Data on pore sizes temperature, salinity, oxygen and humus content, and pH of the beach are presented. A': abundatn microfauna lives down to depths of 3-5 cm Nematodes, copepods, Foraminifera, polychaetes, burrowing amphipods, and young cl ems are the chief components. The microfauna cot lects around organic remains. Lepidopa, Emerita, Aranaeus, Donax, Og~,mis, and hirodotea are characteristic of sand beaches of the open ocean. On sand~flats in sounds there are many clams, annelids, heart urchins, and crustaceans which do not occur along the open sea. There is a Leniency for beach animals to segregate into definite zones. Zonation from the high tide mark to below the low tide line is shown for many animals, a number of which have hard parts. Donex., Chirodotea and Emerita are t~V~picall:r intertidal, whit e the sand dollar, i~Iellita,was found to be most abunchant i~rL:nediate ~ y below the lo:\rtide mark. This paper compares the fauna of tne sea beach with that of bays and sand-flats and the offshore waters. All the permanent macro- fauna of beaches are burrowers and are modified and equipped for burrowing in a number of ways. Some merely Burt themselves while others live in more or less permanent holes. The life history of a typical sand beach arrival, the mole crab, Emerita. talpoida (Say), is described. The action of bacteria and microscopic algae are discussed. Use of bacterial culture methods indicate that one-celled algae are probably more significant in the economy of the beach than previously supposed. A list of animals found on the beaches at Beautort, N.C. is appended. ((Gordon GUnter.) Pettersson, Hans, Swedish Oceanographic Research in Gil, Science, vol. 96, pp. :156-157, 19L~2. Raymond, Percy E., The pigment in black and red sediments, Amer. Jour. Sci., crop. 2L~0, pp. 658469, 19L~2. Richards, H. C. and hill, Dorothy, Great Barrier Reef bores, 1926 and 1937, Descriptions, analyses, and interpretations. Reports of the Great Barrier Reef Committee, crop. 5, pp. l-122, Government Printer, Brisbane, Australia, 19L~2.

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- 12 - P.~ealizin`~ that it -gas essen-Lial to kncY-v the physical arcs chemical inake~up and tile Iciness of the reef ancc that it -,;~as lLil~e~;?ise essen'=l=l to study the i~on-cox~a: ree' foundation, the Cc~-Q;~ttee decided upon a distill in picogram. Holes ~-,e-~` put coo-. on iJichc~e~as Cay and Heron Islanci. These sites ate 700 rifles ap?~rt, on, at about the central po:~+ -a the length of the, eels the Other at the southern end of the reef. The authors stun that two sites were located as Scar to the outer edge of I; -~ as it Gas 17 ^acticable to conduct dri] ~ in ope-~-atio::s., the pO- legs chosen kc lo.> Add lO malts from the seaward Saran of the ba:~rier. The lt;!lichac:La~-s Cay hole was ca~rri~Qto a depth cf 600 beet, -'GhO one on :Icron Island l,O 732 Beets Both passed through se~rera:1 hundred >~ of cohabit orous limestone igloo ~ua~z-for~eral sands but r~eithe~r re~c'~ed the basci~Lent rock. A calico" type of drill bias used on both holes and orbit a small fraction of one percent of core was reco~re~qed '~-l~:l-i;he footage drilled befog 20 feet. Core is recovered with difficulty in porous 1~ateria:l, particular, if a cay the of devil is used, ro-r the shot usec! in devil? ing run into the cavities arid ye 3. ost. ':he cores ~d cuttings frown the torso :~-~-i~ie-~ Beef hol<.~'s here Tracy carefull~r studied and are described in detail. Ho.~eve-~, along~,i-:itl: this factual ~ate,~ial there are interp-retations title ;;hlich all readers evils not agree. Speeds ii~,terpi^~at~ons of the Austra:tiai: cuttings may differ as wide:, as Ire -those based of: the 'famous c3-~i:Lling on Flea Cut i . On page 67 i ~ comments ng on 'Ghe a:,e ? ~ the cleposii~s -:e:~etrated under Heron Island, as ind~c?~-ted by a study of the co-ra'~s, the authors are conserve but-iollo~ing Ails the r sate: "Tne ded.uc$ions offs death of forr~a-uion of the reef rock that one mar draw from the; corals are perhaps more said s~acto~. Thus the fact t'n~t then are all reef Corms indicates ~l~t the surface of. ire fo-rmin~=, reef foci leas Sneerer At a greater (leloth than 2> off 30 fcathorl~s. This is clearly substantiated by Iredale's nor on the ~ollusca." Tile reorderer would Tilde to point cut that the fact that only reef forms were iclenti~led does It necessarily ir~d~cate shallow wa~e-r deposition unless the C0-~2iS clearly are in positions off growth. The reel' Orbs may have bee:: t-~^a:~spo~ - ed do;-j:a a. talus slope In shallow Be-; to deeper water. ti7ret most of '-t is ~ soft limestone ~~-i~tl: s.=dy and

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- 13 - mu6dy detritus. The samples from this interval conta~ed no trace of corals or mollusks but they did show numerous Forar.~inifera. According to Cushman (page 114 in an appendix to the same report) these There a mixture of worn and broken large, shallow water species arid smaller owed preserved deeper Aster species. It appears to the revs enter that drilling into sea-level or into ele- vated reefs hi 11 not yield conch usive evidence as to their origin unless a good percentage of c-ore is recovered. With such a recovery of large diameter cores (preferablyBX, ~ 5/S inches orNX, 2:1/S inches) it would be possible to differentiate between transported material and reef rock made up of corals and algae in position of growth. Evidence of this sort might be decisive, at least as far as some coral reef theories are c oncerned . (H . S . Todd) Schenck, Hubert G. and white' Ro'cert To, Collecting microfossils, Abler* stud. Mat ., vol . 2S, pp . Lr21~ 50, 1942 . Stephenson, T. A., et al, h sg~=posiurL or intertidal Donation of animals and planet s . (') Stephenson, T. A., The causes of the vertical and horizontal distribution of organisms between trademarks in South Africa, Proc. Linnean Soc. Condors, ~ Cloth Session (19L~1-L~), Pt. 3, pp. 2~ 9~232 19L~3. The author summarizes his funds as follows: 'me have little hesitation in co:r:Lcludirl~ ~ flat the principal agent responsib] e for the horizontal distribution of organisms round the South African coast is sea-terperature, that a subsidiar,~,r effect may be produced bar the distribution of nutrient salts, and that no other of the factors involved has more than local effects, excerpt in so far as it may cooperate in a minor degree with the broad ~r~ri~ticns in s=- temperat~ure. "Tn connection ~,^lsith Donation on the open rock (as distinct from that in Potts and shaded pla.ces) we conclude that the controllers of pearl importance are the degree of exposure to the desiccation-heat-light~ complex acting together with the degree of exposure to wave-=ct~onO Contributing effects are undoubtedly produced by feeding habits, com- petition for food and space, and perhaps also by the percentage of time during which plants can utilize nutrient salts. Local effects can be produced by other factors, such as nature of the rock-for~ation and proximity of the rock to sand. Rock-for~tion acts primarily through its effects on degree of exposure to wave-action anc4. distribution of shade. "The Donation in rock-pools is apparently subject to a different combination of controls from that of open rocke Here the leading factors appear to be variations in temperature and salinity with con- tributory effects (at present difficult to estimate) from other causes.

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- ~ - ~ Local effects are -very powerful in the case Of pools; and se] ective factors are probably only,, markedly effective at the higher levels. The populations of pools are affected by degree of exposure to wave- ac' ion and by others of the factors controlling distribution on open rock., as well as by the variations peculiar to pools. "Light, as a primaries cause of distribution, is probably more genera]- ly effective in deter.nining the segregation of shade-loving from surface species than in contra buti.ng to the actual zonation, though it sor'~e- t~nes affects the latter also, especial locally. ''Although the importance of particular factors has been stressed in these paragraphs, it is clear from the information available that almost every factor whose influence between tidemarks can be i~agir.ed is able to produce sore effec ~ on Donations even if thi s effect is not more than local in its results, or not more than contributory to ether effects in its action. " (2) Colman, John, Some intertidal enigmas, Proc. Linnean Soc.London, 15l~th Session (:L941-42), Pt. 3, pp. 232~234, ~ 943. (3) Delf, E. I.~arion, The si gnificance of the exposure [actor ir1 relation to Donation, Proc. Linr~ear~ Soc. London, 154th Session (:lPl+1-Lr2;, Pt. 3, pp. 23Lr-239, 19Lr3. (1~) Chapman, V. J., Zoration of marine algae on the sea-shoe, Proc. L~r~ean Soc . London, 15L~th Session (1941-42 ), Pt . 3, pp . 239-253, 19L~3 0 Stephenson, 76~J., An ecological survey,of a beach on the Island of ~Raasay, Proc. 13n~v. Durham Phil. Soc., carol. 10, pp. 332-357, 1942. S~rerdrup., H. -., Johnson, A. All., and Fleming; R. H., The oceans. their physics, chernistr~r, and general biology, pp. x ~ 1037, 1942. Teichert, Curt, The Devonian of :.lestern Australia, A Preliminary Review, Amer. Jour. Sci., vol. All, pp. 69-9L~; 167-1 Al+, 1943. TYJathin.' E. E., The r':acrof~una of the intertidal sand of banes Bay, I~lillport, But e shire, Trans. Roy. Soc. Edinburgh, voil. 50, pt. 2,, pp . 51+3-561 ~ 191+2. Young, Frederick Plentz, Jr., Flack River stratigraphy aloud faunas, Part 1, AITer. Jour. Sci., vo] . 2L~:Lg pp. 7 L~1-16c, 1 943. Zobell, Claude E., Changes produced by micro-organislvns in sediments after deposition, ~J our. Sed. Petrology, vat . ' 2, pp . 127~136, :L942.

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PLANTS Chapman, V. J., Ar introduction to the study of algae,, pp. x ~ 387, Cambridge (University Press) 1941; New York (TIac~lian Co.~. Conger., Paul .S., Accurr~lation of diatomaceous deposits, Jour. Sed. Petrology, vol . 12, pp . 55~6 ~ 194.2. Davis, John H., Jr., The ecology of the vegetation and topography of the Sand Keys of Florida' Papers from the Tortugas Laboratory, vol. 33, pp. 113-195, Carnegie Inst. Washington Publication 52L~, 19L,2. Johnson, J. Harvard, The geologic importance of calcareous a] gee with rotated bibliography, Quart. Co] orado School of Salines, vol. AS, no. I, pp. :L02, 19~. After discussing the historical and distributional data concerned ng the fossil calcareous algae, the author presents the main portion of his paper!, namely, a bibliography on f os sil algae ~ I,Iost of the papers cited have been abstracted. (Roland A. Brokers. Purer, Edith A., Plant ecology of the coastal salt marshlands of San Diego County, Calif., :Scol. Lion., vol. :L2, pp. 81-ill, 1942. Accordir~: to variation in salinity and the differences in aeration, 60 marsh species are distributed throughout the area. Scottsberg, C., Communities of marine algae in subantarctic and Antarctic waters, K. Swenska Vetenskapsakade Handl. ~ 9, pp. l-92, 1941. ZoBell, Claude E. and Feltham, Catl~er~e 13., The bacterial flora Or a marine mud flat as an ecological factor, Ecology, vol. 23, up. 69-7891942. Water of a sha3]o~r bay in California contains several thousand to a few million bacteria per cc. and the bottom, often exposed, contains many Billions of bacteria per gram. Bacteria occur in mud at depths far below where -other organisms are found. At certain places bacteria create conditions inimical to other forms of life but more generally they are beneficial to animal life by serving as food and by mineral- izing organic matter. PROl'OZOANTS Adams, Bradford C., Suggestions for using Foran~nnifera in zonal paleontology, Amer. Midland Naturalist, vol. 29, pp. 137-1Lr6, 1943 (originally oub-- lished Proc. Sixth Pac. Sci. Cong., vol. 2, pp. 665~670~. Allen, bit En, Occurrences of ''Red Plater" near San Diego, Science, vol. AS, p. L,7], 1942. Clark, Bruce L. and Campbell, Arthur S., Eocene radiolarian faunas from the Mt. Diablo area, California, Geoff. Soc. Avers, Spl. Paper !;o. 39, pp. 1- 112, 19Lr2.

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- 16 - Cushman, Joseph A., A repot' on s~p:Les obtained by the boring at Heron Is] and, Great Barrier Reef, Australia, R_pts . of the threat Barrier Reee:E Cor~nittee, Trot. 5, stipend=- :1, }?r. ll2-119, Govt. P:rirlter, Brisbai1 e., 1942. T.n the summary the following, interesting observations appear: "In some of the samples there its a peculiar assemblage consisting, of larger, shallow wc;terforarninifera, usually much Morn curd broken, accompanied by numerous smaller and well preserved specimens of species known to be characteristic of deeper wad era. This is similar to conditions found to-day about may of -Gne cor=.:L islands of the Pacific Where species l~no-;.n to live in very shallow depths clay be found mix-cd with deeper assemblages. In such asse~rnhla:;es the shello;; water specimens are inva.ric^hl,,~ broken or worn and. represent beach or reef material washed out by wave and current action into deeper water. In such cases far greater weighs is givers to the deeperwater, well preserved specimens in determining the living fauna at that depth.' The author cites the exact horizons where such mixed assemblages occur in the boring at Heron Island. He concludes that there must have beer. decided changes in sea :Level but adequate evidence for such c~=n:;es is rot presented. 7;~;yers, Earl H., Biology of the Foraminifera and their significance in pal eaccology, New York Scads Sci., Trarls., vol. I+, no. 6, 19Lr2. Myers, Earl i., Rate at which Fo~al~.nifera are contributed to marine sediments, Jour. Bed. Petrology, vol. 12, pp. 92-95,, 19L,2. Myers, Earl h., 3iolo~,r, ecology, and monogenesis of ~ pelagic or~in~er, Stanford Unit. Pub., Univ. per. Idol. Sci., vol. 9, no. i, 19L~3. Phleger, F. B., Forar.=nifera of submarine cores from ~ he Continental SO ope, Part 2, But ~ . Geol. Soc . ~r.~erica, vol . 539 pp . 1073-1098 g ~ 943 . . . Vau:;han, T. 7'i't]~, Eocene ~ar:~Fora~nifer~ from Barbados, British Jest Indies, sled a catalogue of the Eric an species of the Discocyclir~idae (Nbst. ), Geol. Soc. Aster. Bull., Trot. 53, pp. 1 S:L ~_~8l 2, 194~. llOO~OUgh, Err. G., Geolo~,ica] extrapo] ation and pseudo-abyssal sediments, BUT] . Abler. ASSOC. Petrol. Geo ~ ., vol. 26, pp. 735-792, 1942. Inch Ides ~ discussion of the environed of certain radiolaria- bearing beds.

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- 17 - CO'CLEr`~RitT}IS Cooper' Chalmer :L., Month Amlcrican (:hitinozoa, (Also. ) ' Geol. Soc. Arch., Bull. vol. 53, i, ]828, 1942. meant on,' s. To On too new species of tile IIyd~oid P`Il:Triothela, British LIuselam (Nat. Hist.~5 British Graham Land :~eA. 193~-37, Sci. Repts., ~~. 7-, UP 255-294 ~ 1940. Vaughan, Thomas Vl!Tayland and ~.~'Je.11s, John IliTest, Rovision of 'the suborders9 families., and genera of the Scleract::nia, Gcol. ~cc. hi., Spl. Paper AN, 1943. In this paper there ia a rather full discussion of the eoo~o~`y of corals, pp. 52-69. The topics are as ollo:~\,s Ret action of corals to environment Depth of '-later locater Temperature IIermaLgpic corals Ahermatypic coral s Salinity Air Light Food Situation Sediment Grog Pith rat e Relation of corals to other animals and to plaints Dials p1 ants Distribution of corals by ocemn currents Sw~-nary of ecology Wire than 17OOO selected references to the literature on the Scloractiria are given on Which num'co^rs 169-2147 deal with ecology and distribution. .re1ls., John 7.t,T., Scle~act~ian coral s from the Eocene Uppoi Scotland formation ox Barbados and the '`.`liocone of Martinique (Abst.~, Geol. Soc. ~;me-f~. g vol. 53, o. ~1812, 1942. :CCTII7TOD:~P2.-S i-lo; H. V., Neglected Gulf Coast Tertia-~ mic~^ofossils5 Bull. Amer. Assoc. Petrol. Gc`~1., vol. 269 up. ll~g-1199, 19l~2. Contains a discussion 3i the onviro~nt and occurrence of ophiu-rians, comatulids., starfish, and. holothuri=ns.

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- 18.- Lo:-enstam, acing A., l`;iIorpholo,,ical response of' At1C=OC-~i2]US to envi~on- rilental c;~all~,os, (Abet. ), Gool. Sac. Air., Bull., vol. 53, p. 1832' 1942~. Ya~anouti, T., Ecological and ph:~j~siolo,~,ical studies on the holo~Ghtlrians in ther c-oral reef; o:E Palao Islands Palac Trop. Biol. Sta. Stud. 1JOl.-:;.l7 iDp-e 6~03-635, 1939. i'.~OLLUSKS . .. Dexter, Ralph 7;~., lIotes on the marine mollusks of Cape Ares, iIa~sach.usetts,, IJalltilus, vo] . 56, no. 29 op. 57-6] ~ 1942. . . . :Edr~.ondsor~,, Charles H. ~ ~'ered=aidae of Ha;-vaii9 Bernice P. ]3is'nop ':~USoU;i:, Ccc . Papers, Pro ~ . ~ 7 7 :?P . 97-150 ~ 1 9~2. Gu'nter7 Gordon., Seasonal cond~tiol1 o~ Texas oystel-s,- P-i~OCo ald Tral~se Te,~as Acad. Sc~ . ~ vo] . 25, Pp. 89-9 3s ~ 9L2. I--edale, T;QS RePO1^t Or! mollus can content o~ Heron Islaild r'ee~ bcring sa::~p~es, Repts. o~ ohe Great 3arrier Reer Committee9 vo:. 5, Aocend~ 1 ~ ?:p. ~ 20-122, Go~rt. Printer, 3r ~ sbane, 1942. A e-camirlation o`= mo~1~3scan fossils ~rom the dri31 hole reveaJed no ev ~ de~ce o~ an`,r sa~re littoral species. Bec?~use the fossils were fourd a~t several ho;:izo;;~s fro~n the surface 4~o a c':~pth 31 696 feet, the author conc1 udes tnat tl~ere have been three o1 .. ou~^ subr.,ergences . The author has ~itt3 e hesita~ion in re<~ard 'ng all o~ the ~ossils as of recent age, statirl, ~hat the speci"-lens f3~01~ tr,e '"irst 60 [eet ai^e indistinc~-`shable from she~'s co~lected of: the ~=ach today. The boring mol:Lus;Ks ~rcm a depth of 500 feet are ~ep~esex~od by "casts"' only, but as the associated barnacles are t~i;~ i;'ne ~re~h state of -' econt spec~rflei~s" the author conclud!=s tl:~t the mollusks too must be recer~t. i1any of the molluscan shells are re?:orted as ~rag~nei~ts bi~t it is not cl~ar from the report wh~ther the breal~age is du~ to the dr~l:Ling ope:~ations or to erosion prior -to deposition. Thc aut~nor does not .mer~tion the possibility th=~ littoral rnolluscan sho71= may- ha~re 'ceen carried beyond the lit!~oral zor~e before be=~:, dc;,positod. The ~act that the fossils a-re indist~nguishab:Le ~ror.~ those cn the beach ~ odacy does not necessaril~y ind.icato a recent age. ~any Tert~ary mollusks ~rom the Pac~fic fal] into this cat~gory, some sh=~Is r~taininP strong traces o~ thei-~ orig:~nal color pattc~r~. (LI. S. Ladd). Ire dale, Tom ,and Alla:~., ~Joyce.' A revievl' o~ the relat~oiash~ps of the mollusca o:C Lorc1 Ho~-'e Ts''and, Austra~ian Zoolo~,tst, ~ro]. 95 pt. 4, l~p. 444-45:1, ~ 9400

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- 19 - Keen, A. I;~.yra, Viability of a Brine srla~.l, Nautilus, vat. 56., Lo. 1, Cp. 34-35, 19l~2' Leer., MONO Dora and Dol;~, Charlotte 1.*, An a:~:o~at~ct check list of the gastropods of Cape Arago, Oregon, Oregon Stat;= Lionographs, Studies in Zool. ~ no. 3, pp. .-16, 1942. Well, ~or,n=~n D., Late Paleozoic pelecypod~>, part II' ;~I:~ilacea, pp. ].-~15, 15 pi=., 191~2. Reinhart, Phillips-, I;esozoi.c and Heroic Arcidae from Able Pacific Slope of Forth America ~ Geol. Soc. America, Spl. Paper Into. 47, 1 9L~3 . . . . . Richards, Horace G. and Harbisor, throne, Pliocene i.nv~rtehrat,e fray of ITew 3erse',~, Proc. AcaJ. ^>T=t. Sci. Philadelphia, -\~Olo SLY, pp. 167-2S0, 191+2. Richards, Horace G., Pleistocene mollusks freon ~;ar~,ari~a Island, Ve ~ezuela, Jour. Pal Moo, vol. 17, pp. 120-1 of, 19L~3. 7?icharc~s, Horace Gc, Pliocene arid Pleistocene mol~uslis troll the S OCR for page 10
Tells, Wayne Tar. g :Scol~o~ica.1 sides o': the pinnothericT Ci~c;~7.:S 01 Puget Sou~cT.' Uniter. :;'ashirl,;-uon Pllb. Ocearlo~., vol. 2, up. 19-50, 1940 -;i~son' Cha.ries :~., The copepods of the pla~ktor~ gathered during the last cruise off the Ca-~i~e`~;e, pp. v ~ 237, Carnegie Inst. .~.ashii~gton P1J13. 536, 1942. =~RT:~:23R~TES :3ertram, G. C. L., The biolo,~=,y of the liJeddell acid cx~abeater seals wit a study of the comparative behavior of the Pi`~^ipedia' :3r~uish loused (rTat. Fist.) ]3~tish G.rc~han Land Eloped. L934-37s Sci* Relets., Carol. l, pp . 1-139 5 1940 David Lore R..5 Miocene fishes of Southern Cali~o-rnia, Geol. Soc. ~7.er. Opt. Put . 43, pi . :L-123 g 1942. CTui~r, Gordon, Contributions to the natural h:tstor~r of the bottlenose dol~hirl, Tu-rsiops trui~cat~s (~`r!~onta~uc), of 4-he Texas coast, With particular re7^erei~ce -6o loo] habits, Joule tilalmme~ vol. 23~ IMP. 267- 276, 1942. Gutter, Gordon, A list of the fishes of tile man lad of Youth and I;!~dd:le America reco-rdef~ -tom both 1~=sh~l!at~r alla sea ~`;ate~^, Allure did. ITat., vol. 23 ~ op . 30 7-3269 191~2 . i]=urQo:r, S. P. ~ The seals or the IJ.S.S.R. The -Ivan ,-`l~te::~:ca~ casts of the malaise ~na=~1 fishery. Series a Econom~cal1 y ~ ";oloio ed a:~:cma:Ls of the U.S.S.~., gene ray editor, If. A. 3ib-rinsk~i, -!.~roscou-I~i::c7~ad, pp. 105, figs. iS, 1933 (:[n Russians. An account of the biology and distribution of tale wa:Lrus, sea lion, and ]0 species of hair seals. One o~ the best papers c:~ this subject Published by the Russians. (Re!-i::Lngton ~liellogg) P=LOBL~.iATI(~^L FOSSILS Clouds Preston E. g ~ r. g totes on strot`~atolites, Amer. Jot: I. Sci., Pro Le 240, pp. 363-379 s )9~2 DuBois, :5. P., :Sv~dence on the nature of conodol~tsO Jour. PaDeo.3vo~. DL7 p:. l55-L59, 1943. The c~assifica-tioi: of co:aodonts Ah ~:nelida is favored by DuBois on the evidence that conodoi~ts occur as pairs or in u:~orm:Ly arranged groups or slabs of da;;~K Pe~asy:~vania;~ shal es from Illinois. Furthermore, conodo~:t s a' e assoc~ ated With prob:lematic segmented it;~?ressiors ~ problematic parapodia, arid problematic worn trail s. Come asseml::lages do not exhibit the uniform arrangement add are designated as coprolitic in origin. To counterbalance the evidence presented by associated remains, some admittedly

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- 21 - vertebrate r.e~r.r~alus such as Lystraca~:thus spines5 Claco6_ teeth., and Plo~r~sella scales are found ire abundance associated '.rith the cono~onts The e~r~dei~ce that conoc3..o~nts are fish teeth on tile basis of their cal.cium phosphate composition is challenged because solve coral tubes have ':een reported to be largely- ca:Lciurn phosphate. boom tubes are secreted by the ectoder~. Since the "yucca cavity and pharynx are formed by inva~,'~nation of the embryonic ectoderm anal solace the arid jaws are probably physiologic homologs of the ectoderm'" it is then probable that some cows are capable of secreting calc~wr~ phosphate mandibl e parts. Ecologically the typical Pennsylvanian black shale associations include brachiopocts, Oi~biculo~dea, and Ida, For. trails aced bur^ro:.~s, and the ~rerte3.:rate retrains listed above. ~ Samuel All ison) Scott;' h. -fir s Conodont assemblages from the Heath for~natio:~., Montana, Jour. PaTeo ., vo:L. 16, I, . 293-300, 1942. Many conodont assemblages are described flora the bract Neatly. snares of 1l.Iontal~ae The ideal assemblage is described as co:ls.!sting of ,(?ai,~ed groups9 at least one pair O' the platform type such as ?cl~y~nathus, Ca:ms`~nathus, or Strepto~.:nathodus' ~ least one pail. of the den,~iculated her or by ade ,J~vpe such as Ozarkodina, Bryal~todus, Prior: odors, or Prioniode~la"; alad lastly, four pairs of H~ndeocl~e]la. :Each of the assemblages containing the various paired for,~s acre coated to have come from ~ single animal. If this is true, it could greatly reduce the number of rocor~izacle genera and species This black mucks in which these assemblages were laid down are i.:terpret- ed as having acownulated Ilk waters exceptionally call-: and disturb-d. Otner~ise the coot groups wou7. ~ have been dispersed. ~ Samuel Ellison) t~.lISCE:LLAt~r~O~JS ITS Dr. Remington Ke710~g has submitted the follo~3ii~<,- list of Discovery Reports published in Erig3 and 'ad the 5ambriclge Uni~rex~s~:r P~ess. This :List sup^~ernents the ore that appeared in the Report of the 3~kcor.~tt=e on the Ecology of i`,;:arine Organisms issued ~ :~`ro;Ter~be:- 1941. Anon. . Report on the progress of the Discoverer Co~i~ttee's in- vesti<.,ations., Discovery Committee, Univ. Cambric, Press, pp. ~2, pis. 10.? June, 1937. :Dennell, Rat ph. On the structure of I;he photophores of soles Decc.~poc3 Crustacea, Trot. 2O, up. 307-382, ~Is. 24-26.' December 1940. Anor10, Station 1 ist 193:L-1933., NTo7i . 21 9 pp. l-2265 pa S. 4S I,. ~ 94] . Hamilton, G. E., A rare porpoise of the South Atlantic, Pi~oc24el~a dioptl~ica (Lahille, 1 912), vol. 219 pp. 227-23hr, p ~ s . 5-6, F=':. 194.1.

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- 22 - Stophe~, A. C., T1~e Echiurid.a ~ SiphuncuJida~ 7 and Pri<~pulidac collected by the slips of tllo Discover`: Cot during the `~rears 1926 to 1937, Carol . 2], pp ~ 235-260 ~ October, 1941. Hi, T. John, Phytoplank~ton pe--iod~icity in Antarc+,~c vow. 2l, PL:. 261~3569 Octotcr, 1942. A;~~s Station ~ ist ~ 933-1935, Frog . sur:Eace ~ alters, 22, up. 1-196, p] s. 4, Itch L942. 3!Iackintosh, N. A*, The southern stocks of whal above win pp. 197-300, figs. 9, June ~ 942. i' 1 s, `" o1 ~2 2,