Cover Image

Not for Sale



View/Hide Left Panel
Click for next page ( 501


The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 500
APPENDIX B METHODOLOGY SURVEY OF ACADEMIC LIFE SCIENCE DEPARTM ENTS SOURCE OF DEPARTMENTAL MAILING LIST Between July 1967 end November 1968, 2,277 identifiable departments, located in universities or health-professional schools received the question- naire entitled "Survey of the Life Sciences" (Exhibit B-19. Of these, 1,340 responded and 1,256 met the criteria for inclusion. Irrespective of whether the department had a doctoral program, it was included in the survey if its parent institution had granted one or more doctorates in any life science area. Selection of departments was based on their titles as obtained from three sources: The American Institute of Biological Sciences: listing of biology de- partments. Office of Scientific Personnel, National Research Council. 500

OCR for page 500
APPENDIX B Directory of Amencan Association of Medical Colleges*: list of pre- clinical and clinical departments of the 87 functioning U.S. medical schools. POPULATION SELECTION Definition of a Department Major divisions within clinical departments, or divisions of clinical depart- ments in teaching hospitals, were not considered separately. Information pertaining to such divisions was requested from the chairmen of their parent departments. Similarly, agricultural field stations were not surveyed as separate departments. A summary of the departments surveyed is shown in Table B-1. By definition, a functioning department reported one or more full-time faculty members. Interdepartmental groups were rejected as both their faculty and their students were members of other departments. Exclusion Criteria To minimize overlap with the Academy's behavioral and social sciences survey,: responses from 35 psychiatry departments and 5 psychiatry and neurology departments were excluded. A total of 84 departmental returns were excluded for the various reasons shown in Table B-2. Valid responses were received from 1,256 departments. DATA ANALYSIS Two parallel series of correlations were carried out on the resultant list of valid responses. In the first series departments were grouped by their school i: Directory of Administrative Staff, Department Chairmen and Individual Members ill Medical Schools of tile United States and Canada, Association of American Med- ical Colleges, Evanston, Illinois, 1967. t Tile Behavioral and Social Sciences: Outlook and Needs, A Report by The Be- havioral and Social Sciences Survey Committee under the auspices of The Committee on Science and Public Policy, National Academy of Sciences; The Committee on Problems and Policy, Social Science Research Council. National Academy of Sci- ences, Washington, D.C., 1969. 501

OCR for page 500
502 THE LIFE SCIENCES TABLE B-1 Total Departments Surveyed in Each Type of School NUMBER OF QUESTIONNAIRES SCHOOL AFFILIATION Returned % Returned Mailed Valid Valid TOTAL, ALL DEPARTMENTS a Subtotal, All DeparUnents Except Clinical Medical Departments 2,2771,256 55.2 1,450924 63.7 Departments in Schools of: Agriculture3 84252 65.6 Arts and Sciences355236 66.5 Dentistry8S 62.5 Engineering44 100.0 Forestry2115 71.4 Graduate Studies216 28.6 Pharmacy177 41.2 Public HealthSS 100.0 Veterinary Medicine5732 56.1 Medical Science Subtotal1,405694 49.4 Preclinical578362 62.6 Clinical827332 40.1 a Only departments from universities or professional schools that had granted a doctorate in a biological field were included in this survey. affiliation, that is, medical schools, schools of arts and sciences, and so on. Where multiple schools were indicated, the single school of "highest prece- dence" was chosen. For all departments where the graduate school was one of two schools listed, the other type of school was given precedence, hence the number of graduate schools as represented in this survey appears low. If both the school of agriculture and the school of arts and sciences were checked, precedence was determined on an ad hoc basis in light of knowl- edge of the particular departments involved. Table B-3 gives precedence used. Because of its large size, the Division of Biological Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, deserves mention. A single questionnaire covering the activity of all seven of the major sections of this division was submitted. This aggregate return was listed as a private school of arts and

OCR for page 500
AP PENDIX B 503 TABLE B-2 Departmental Responses Excluded from Data Analysis NUMBER EXCLUDED DEPARTMENTAL NAME REASON FOR EXCLUSION 84 TOTAL GROUP 1 ~ Overlap with 35 Psychiatry ~ Behavioral and Social 5 Psychiatry and Neurology l Sciences Surveys 2 Psychology GROUP 2 6 Agricultural Chemistry and Soils 1 Agricultural Engineering 1 Agricultural Industries 2 Agronomy and Soil Science 1 Behavioral Sciences 1 Biological and Agricultural Engineering 1 Biomathematics 1 Biometry 1 Biostatistics 1 Chemistry Not 1 Environmental Sciences and Engineering Considered 5 Food Science a Life Science 1 Food Science and Biochemistry Department 3 Food Science and Technology 1 Food Technology 1 Medical Statistics, Epidemiology, and Population Genetics 3 Medicinal Chemistry 1 Pharmaceutical Chemistry 1 Plant, Soil, and Water Science 1 Soil and Water Science 2 Soil Science 1 Soils 1 Statistics GROUP 3 r 1 Division of Science and Mathematics I Not an 1 Institute of Child Behavior and | Academic Development ~ Department 1 Water Resources Laboratory 1 World Forestry Institute ~ a TI2e Behavioral and Social Sciences: Outlook and Needs. A Report by The Behavioral and Social Sciences Survey Committee, under the auspices of the Committee on Science and Public Policy, National Academy of Sciences; The Committee on Problems and Policy, Social Science Research Council. National Academy of Sciences, Washington, D.C., 1969.

OCR for page 500
504 THE LIFE SCIENCES TABLE B-3 Coding Precedence for Departments with Multiple School Affiliation PRECEDENCE NONAGRICULTURAL SCHOOLS AG RICULTURAL SCHOOLS 2 3 4 s Medical Dental Arts and Sciences ~ . . engineering Graduate Veterinary Medicine Forestry Agriculture Graduate TABLE B-4 Groupings of Departmental Names into "Class of Depart- ment" Categories "CLASS OF DEPARTMENT" GROUPING NUMBER OF DEPARTMENTS TOTAL Agricultural Sciences Subtotal Animal Husbandry Agronomy and Forestry Biological Sciences Subtotal Anatomy Biochemistry and Nutrition Biology and Ecology Biophysics and Biomedical Engineering Botany Genetics Microbiology Pathology Pharmacology Physiology Zoology and Entomology Clinical Medical Sciences Subtotal 1,256 186 90 96 731 65 107 Ill 16 52 10 87 65 58 75 ~5 339 sciences, perhaps making the total response in this category somewhat high. For final correlations, the following school types were analyzed to- gether: arts and sciences, graduate studies, and engineering. A second category consisted of agriculture and forestry schools. The returns from schools of dentistry, pharmacy, public health, and veterinary medicine were listed under the title "Other Health-Professional Schools."

OCR for page 500
APPENDIX B The second series grouped departments by discipline using departmental titles reported by their chairmen. Table B-4 shows the number of depart- ments in each category. Table B-5 contains a complete listing of depart- ments and the major category to which each was assigned. (All clinical medical departments were analyzed as a single group because they shared many common characteristics and they differed markedly from other life science departments.) Definitions and Coding Restrictions The questionnaire insert, Exhibit B-2, defines the following: Full-time faculty Instructor Continuing research associate Postdoctoral appointee Graduate student Potential Ph.D. candidate Research space (Detailed instructions as to what constitutes research space as reported in Questions 20 and 21) It should be noted that identical definitions for Continuing Senior Research Associate and Postdoctoral Appointee were employed in this questionnaire and the individual questionnaire. Where possible, all definitions were the same as those used in the National Research Council study on post- doctoral education.* SPECIAL DEFINITIONS For convenience and conciseness, two special departmental categories are utilized ire certain analyses: "Performer Departments" and "Promiser Departments." Performer department: Any department that reported one or more potential Ph.D. candidates and that had awarded at least one doctoral degree in either academic year 1964-1965 or 1966-1967. Promiser department: Any department reporting at least one Ph.D. candidate, no degrees awarded during either academic year 1964-1965 or 1966-1967, and the expectation of awarding at least one degree during academic year 1969-1970. ~ The Invisible University: Postdoctoral Education in the United States, Report of a Study Conducted under the Auspices of the National Research Council. National Academy of Sciences, Washington, D.C., 1969. 505

OCR for page 500
506 THE LIFE SCIENCES TABLE B-S mental Titles Departmental Disciplinary Categories Based on Depart NUMBER OF DEPARTMENTS CATEGORY l l 2 l 2 3 l 9 9 l 2 1 l 3 2 2 7 1 96 1 2 23 1 2 1 1 TOTAL, ANIMAL HUSBANDRY Animal Husbandry Vivarial Science and Research Animal Diseases Animal Industry Large Animal Medicine Small Animal Medicine and Surgery Dairy and Food Industry Dairy Science Animal and Dairy Science Poultry Husbandry Poultry Science Avian Diseases Veterinary Science Veterinary Anatomy Veterinary and Animal Science Veterinary Bacteriology Veterinary Physiology and Pharmacology Veterinary Public Health Veterinary Medicine and Animal Physiology Veterinary Pathology Veterinary Clinical Medicine and Surgery Veterinary Microbiology, Pathology, and Public Health Veterinary Physiology Veterinary Microbiology Animal Pathology Animal Science Animal Range and Wildlife Science TOTAL, AGRONOMY AND FORESTRY Agriculture Science Agriculture Agronomy Agronomy and Plant Genetics Agronomy and Genetics Farm Crops Crop Science Grain Science and Industry Plant Breeding Seed Investigation Plant Industry Conservation

OCR for page 500
APPENDIX B 507 TABLE B-S Continued NUMBER OF DEPARTMENTS CATEGORY 14 1 1 2 2 1 65 61 107 l 4 3 l Forest Chemistry Forest and Wood Science(s) Forestry and Conservation Forestry and Range Management Forest Resources Forestry (School) and Forest Resources (School) Harvard Forest Resource Development Silviculture Watershed Management Wood Technology and Forest Chemistry Horticultural Science Horticulture and Forestry Floriculture and Ornamental Horticulture Pomology Park Administration, Horticulture, and Entomology Vegetable Crops Viticulture and Enology (Enology) Soils and Plant Nutrition TOTAL, ANATOMY Biological Structure Anatomy Anatomy and Physiology Anatomy and Cell Biology TOTAL, BIOCHEMISTRY AND NUTRITION Agricultural Biochemistry and Soils Agricultural Biochemistry Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology Physiological Chemistry Experiment Station Biochemistry Biochemistry and Biophysics Biochemistry and Microbiology Biochemistry Molecular Biology Molecular and Cellular Biology Nutrition and Metabolism Nutritional Sciences Nutrition and Food Science Institute of Molecular Biology Molecular and Genetic Biology Pharmaceutical Biochemistry Biological Chemistry

OCR for page 500
508 THE LIFE SCIENCES TABLE B-S Continued NUMBER OF DEPARTMENTS CATEGORY 111 26 64 16 1 TOTAL, BIOLOGY AND ECOLOGY Biological Science Arctic Biology Biological and Medical Science Biological Science (Division) Cellular Biology Organismic Biology Psychobiology Marine Biology and Oceanography Developmental Biology Agricultural Biology Biology Division of Biology Biological Research Center Center for Theoretical Biology Life Sciences Natural Sciences Wildlife Ecology Paleontology Museum of Paleontology Oceanography TOTAL, BIOPHYSICS AND BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING Radiation Biology Radiation Biology and Biophysics Radiological Science Biophysics and Bioeng~neering Biophysics and Physical Biochemistry Biophysics and Microbiology Biophysics Physical Biology Bioengineering TOTAL, BOTANY (Excludes Plant Pathology and Plant Physiology) Forest Botany and Pathology Arboretum (Arnold) Plant Biology Plant Science Plant Research Lab (MSU/AEC) Herbarium Botany and Biology Botany and Microbiology (Bacteriology) Botany and Plant Pathology Botany

OCR for page 500
AP PENDIX B 509 TABLE B-S Continued NUMBER OF DEPARTMENTS CATEGORY 10 2 7 87 66 65 14 44 58 56 67 86 26 1 TOTAL, GENETICS Animal Genetics Human Genetics Genetics TOTAL, MICROBIOLOGY Bacteriology Bacteriology and Botany Bacteriology and Immunology Medical Microbiology and Immunology Medical Microbiology Microbiology, Medical Technology Microbiology, Pathology, and Public Health Microbiology TOTAL, PATHOLOGY Plant Pathology Plant Pathology and Entomology Plant Pathology and Genetics Plant Pathology and Bacteriology Pathobiology Experimental and Anatomic Pathology Pathology Pathology, Parasitology, and Public Health TOTAL, PHARMACOLOGY Pharmacology Biochemical Pharmacology Pharmacy College TOTAL, PHYSIOLOGY Plant Physiology Neurosciences Physiology and Pharmacology Experimental Endocrinology Physiology TOTAL, ZOOLOGY AND ENTOMOLOGY Forest Zoology Entomology Entomology, Fisheries, and Wildlife Entomology and Applied Ecology Entomology and Limnology Entomology and Parasitology Entomology and Economic Zoology

OCR for page 500
THE LIFE SCIENCES TABLE B-S Continued NUMBER OF DEPARTMENTS CATEGORY 3 2 2 3 7 36 339 28 11 11 29 21 16 38 8 3 2 3 12 4 2 1 15 32 32 21 Wildlife and Fisheries Wildlife Management Nematology Zoology and Physiology Zoology and Entomology Zoology TOTAL, CLINICAL MEDICAL SCIENCES Medicine Internal Medicine Research Medicine Dermatology Obstetrics and Gynecology Ophthalmology and Otolaryngology Otolaryngology and Maxillo Facial Surgery Pediatrics Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Rehabilitation Medicine Physical Medicine Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine Preventive Medicine Preventive Medicine and Community (environmental) Health Preventive Medicine and Rehabilitation Community Health Tropical Public Health Environmental Health Environmental Medicine Occupational and Environmental Health Preventive Medicine and Public Health Medical Psychology Neurology Radiology Surgery Anesthesia Neurosurgery Neurological Surgery Orthopedics Orthopedic Surgery Urology Oral Biology Dentistry and Dental Research Experimental Medicine Oncology Clinical Pathology

OCR for page 500
APPENDIX B 511 SURVEY OF THE LIFE SCIENCES ,. Conducted by The Committee on Research in The Life Sciences under the Sponsorship of The Committee on Science and Public Policy (COSPUP) NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES-NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL This questionnaire is to be completed only by the Chairman or Head (Acting, Rotating or Permanent) of a College or University Academic Department in the Agricultural, Biological or Medical Sciences. All data requested herein refer to Academic Year 1966-67 unless otherwise specified. This form will be held in confidence; subsequent published information will be statistical in nature, un- identifiable with individual organizations or respondents. Please type or print answers. GENERAL INFORMATION NAME (Lest) (F`nt) (MiddJe Initial) 1. Name of University A_ 2. School or College of: ~ Arts and Sciences ~ Medicine = Agriculture = Pharmacy _ Dentistry _ Public Health Engineering Veterinary Medicine _ Forestry _ Other (specify) Graduate Studies 3. Department of | 4. Campus ~- (Ci~) (Same) ~l 5. Your University is? (Check (a/) one) Private :: State O Municipal :] Federal EXHIBIT B-1 Questionnaire used in departmental survey.

OCR for page 500
512 THE LIFE SCIENCES STAFF 6. FULL-TIME FACULTY: (See separate sheet of DEFINITIONS) Complete the table below for Academic Year 1966-67. FACULTY LEVEL Professor Associate Professor Assistant Professor_ Instructor Other TOTAL Number of Full Time Faculty During Academic Year 1966-67 Additional Positions Budgeted but Unfilled Probable Increase in 1970-71 Over Number Budgeted 7. FULL-TIME NON-FACULTY PERSONNEL: How many of each of the following were in your department during Academic Year 1966-67? (see separate sheet of DEFINITIONS) Continuing or Senior Research Associates Postdoctoral Appointees (whether "Fellow," "Trainee,""Research Associate," etc.) Research Technicians/Professional Animal-Care Personnel Business or Laboratory Manager Other Supporting Personnel (Laboratory Assistants, Shop and Stockroom Personnel, etc.) Clerical/Secretarial/Editorial Staff TOTAL RESEARCH TRAINING ACTIVITIES POSTDOCTORAL PROGRAM 8. How many Postdoctoral Appointees (see separate sheet for DEFINITION) were in your department during Academic Year 1966-67? How many of these were supported from the following sources? Fellowships: Federal USPHS NSF Other Federal State Industrial Other Non-Federal Foreign Sources Training Grants: Federal Non-Federal Institutional Grants: Federal Non-Federal Research Project Funds: U^A - I' Non-Federal Other 9. Of the total number of Postdoctoral Appointees who were in your department during Academic Year 1966-67 (See Item 8), how many were foreign nationals? Of these, how many received their doctoral degrees outside the United States? 10. How many MD's were in research training in your department during Academic Year 1966-67 as: a. Residents? Typical Period: years months b. Postdoctoral Appointees? Typical Period: _ years _months 2 EXHIBIT B- 1 Questionnaire used in departmental survey.

OCR for page 500
APPENDIX B 513 11. How many Postdoctoral Appointees in your department during Academic Year 1966-67 earned their doctoral degrees in your own: University? School!College? Department? PREDOCI.ORAL PROGRAM: (See separate sheet for DEFINITIONS of Graduate Students, Potential PhD Candidates, etc.) 12a. How many Graduate Students were in your department during Academic Year 1966-67? . b. Of these, how many were Potential PhD Candblates? _ 13. How many of your Potential PhD Candidates (item 12b) received stipend support from the following sources? If the funds supporting any student(s) were from multiple sources, indicate source of pancipd stipend in Col- umn I and secondary stipend source in Column II. Count each student no more than once in each column. Column I Column II Principal Secondary Stipend Stipend University-funded Teaching/Research Assistantships Fellowships awarded to the individual from: Local sources (University, Alumni, etc.) Federal competitive programs (NIH, NSF, etc.) Other national competitive fellowship programs NDEA Awards Departmental Training Grants NIH Other Non-Federal Institutional-type Grants NIH Voluntary Agencies/Foundations Foreign Students supported by home country Research Assistantships defrayed by funds appropriated or granted to support faculty research Other Sources TOTAL should be same as 12b 14. During Academic Year 1966-67 how many of your Graduate Students had support for? 1 1-12 months 8-10 months 15. How many of your foil-time Graduate Students with 11-12 months support received total stipend support (Ex- cluding Family Allowances) from all sources at a level: a. higher than that given by NIH, NSF, etc. fellowships (first year, S2,400; intermediate years, S2,600; termi- nal year, S2,800)? b. hewer than that given by NIH, NSF, etc. fellowships (first year, S2,400; intermediate years, S2,600; termi- nal year $2,800)? 16a. How many candidates for the MD degree were engaged in research in your department during Academic Year 1966-67 who were: (1) also candidates for the PhD degree? (2) not candidates for the PhD degree? b. How many holders of the MD degree also were candidates for the PhD degree? 3 EXHIBIT B-1 Questionnaire used in departmental survey.

OCR for page 500
514 THE LIFE SCIENCES 17. With the faculty and space you had during Academic Year 1966-67 (or space available to you by January 1, 1968), could you accommodate more Potential PhD Candidates, given adequate funds to support them and their research? Yes :: No :: If YES, how many additional Potential PhD Candidates? .- If NO, is this due to lack of one or more of the following: ~ ~Space? C| Faculty? U Other (specify)? 1 8a. How many more Potential PhD Candidates do you expect to have in 1970-71 than you had in Academic Year 1 966-67? b. Will this require more space? Yes ~ No O If YES: How much research, office and instructional space? net sq. ft. Is such space under construction or in an advanced planning stage? Yes:: NoO c. Will this require more full-time faculty? Yes O No O If YES, how many? 19a. How many PhD degrees were awarded in your department during the Academic Years: 1964~65? 1966-67? b. Estimate how many will be awarded during the Academic Year 1969-70. RESEARCH SPACE 20. What was the approximate total usable (net) research space available in your department as of July 1, 1967? (see separate sheet for Special Instructions) Answer: net sq. ft. 21. If additional space of the type considered in Question 20 is planned for occupancy by 1970, please cite the expected increment in space. net sq. ft. DEPARTMENTAL RESEARCH BUDGET 22. How many research grants and research contracts were active in your department on January 1,1967? Federal Non-Federal 23. In calendar year 1966-67 (or your latest fiscal year: ~ is, 196_ to , 196_) (month' = (month' what were the total direct cost expenditures and obligations for reseir~ projects carried on by the personnel of your department from funds other than those provided by the university budget? Include under 'Federal' all expenditures from Federal funds which have been provided as institutional awards, prodded such reported expenditures were under the control of yourself or of members of your department. For inter-departmental research programs, include only those expenditures and obligations that relate to your department's contribu tion to the programs. Count all funds only once. Federal S Non-Federal $ 24a. How many of your Full-tune Faculty listed in Question #6 are engaged in research 20% or more of their time? b. Of these, what percentage of their total academic or professional salaries is derived from the instihtion's cur- rent general funds? To 4 EXHIBIT B-1 Questionnaire used in departmental survey.

OCR for page 500
APPENDIX B S 15 SPECIALIZED FACILITIES 25. For each SPECIALIZED FACILITY that is relevant to the research programs of your department check (of) the most appropriate column in Part A and complete Part B. Part A Item _ SPECIALIZED FACILITY I Field areas Zoo/Aquarium Taxonomic research collection Organism-identification service_ Tropical terrestrial station CHECK ONLY ONE COLUMN PER ITEM Dept. Now Has or Has Contracted to Obtain Facility 6 Tropical marine station Marine station other than tropical I i I 8 High-altitude laboratory 9 Low-pressure chambers 10 High-pressure chambers Dept. Has Access to Facility But Another Which is is Needed Adequate by Dept. Fac{lIty Unavailable to Dept. But Needed 11 Programmed climate-controlled rooms (phytotron, biotron, etc.)_ 12 Computer center 13 Primate center 14 Other specialized animal colony 15 Germ-free animal facility 16 Animal-surgery facility 17 Animal-quarantine facility 18 General animal-care facility 19 Cell- and tissue-culture facility 20 High-intensity radioactive sources 21 Center for large-scale pro- duction of biological materials ,2 Clinical research ward 23 Greenhouse 24 Ships greater than 18 ft. (specify length:_ft.) 25 Electrically shielded room 26 Instrument design and/or fabrication facility Part B Select up to 3 items from those you have checked in the right-hand column (Facility Unavailable to Dept. But Needed) and rank in order of greatest priority. Item No. Ist Priority Item No. .S 2nd Priority Item No. EXHIBIT B-1 Questionnaire used in departmental survey. 3rd Priority

OCR for page 500
516 THE LIFE SCIENCES MAJOR INSTRUMENTS 26. For each MAJOR INSTRUMENT that is relevant to the research programs of your department check (a/) the most appropriate column in Part A and complete Part B. Part A CHECK ONLY ONE COLUMN PER ITEM Dept. Owns or Has Contracted to Obtain Dept. Has Access Instrument to Instrument But I But Which Another Which Item is is Needed is No. MAJOR INSTRUMENT Adequate by Dept. Adequate Aco~c 1 Acoustic-analysis equipment _ 2 Sonar 3 Ultrasonic probes and censoring system Centrifuges 4 Analytical ultracentrifuge _ 5 Preparative ultracentrifuge 6 Refrigerated centrifuge Chromatography ~ Amino acid analyzer _ 8 Gas chromatograph 9 Programmed gradient pump_ Counters 10 Automatic particle counter l l Scintillation counter 12 Whole-body counter X-ray 13 X-ray crystallographic analysis system 14 X-ray diagnostic system _ 15 X-ray source Microscopy 16 Electron microscope 17 Electron probe for microscopy_ 18 Fluorescence microscope 19 Metallograph 20 Microtome-cryostat 21 Phase-contrast microscope Spectrometers 22 Electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer 23 Mass spectrometer 24 Nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer Anolber is Needed by Dept. EXHIBIT B-1 Questionnaire used in departmental survey. Instrument Unavailable to Dept. But Needed

OCR for page 500
APPENDIX B 517 . . . _ _ CHECK ONLY ONE COLUMN PER ITEM Dept. Owns or H" Contracted to Obtain Dept. Has Access Instrument to Instrument Which But Which But is Another is Aver Item Adequate is Needed Adequate is Needed No. MAJOR INSTRUMENT by Dept. by Dept. _. Spc~ctropbotometersl-polar. imeters/-fioorimeter 25 Circular dichroism analyzer 26 Infrared spectrophotometer 27 Microspectrophotometer 28 Spectrofluorimeter 29 Spectropolarimetcr 30 Ultraviolet spectrophotometer_ M~cell~eous 31 Apparatus for measuring fast chemical reactions_ 32 Artificial kidney 33 Cine and time-motion analysis equipment 34 Closed-circuit TV 35 Electrophoresis apparatus (various types) 36 Intensive-care patient monitoring system 37 Infrared CO2 analyzer 38 Laser system 39 Large-scale fermenter 40 Li&ht-scattering photometer 41 Microcalorimeter 42 Multi-channel oscilloscope 43 Multi-channel recorder 44 Osmometers 45 Small specialized computer system (CATiLINC, ctc.)_ 46 Stimulus programming and operant conditioning equipment 47 Telemetering system Part B Select up to 3 items from those you beve cbecl~ed in the right-hand column (Instn~ment Is Unassailable to Dept. But Needed) and rank in order of greatest priority. Item No. Item No. Item No. let Prloriq 2nd Pnoriq EXHIBIT B-1 Questionnaire used in departmental survey. Instrument Unscalable to Dept. But Needed 3rd Priority

OCR for page 500
518 THE LIFE SCIENCES DEPARTMENTAL NEEDS 27. Does your department very seriously require addlthnal funds for the support of research and/or research "milling: (1) To Improve the research endeavor of your department at the level of Graduate Student enroUment you had during Academic Year 1966-67? Yes O No :: (2) To permit a planned increase in the research and/or research training endeavors of your department? Yes O No O If YES is marked for either question, check (a/) all appropriate items in Part A and complete Part B Column I Column II Part A To Remedy for Expanslon Item No. FUNDS REQUIRED FOR 1 Stipends and tuition for predoctoral students. 2 Stipends for postdoctoral appointees 3 Salaries for additional faculty 4 Salaries for additional support personnel 5 Specialized research facilities (of the types listed in Question 25) 6 7 8 9 10 Part B To Remedy Cumat Inadequacies Major research instruments Minor equipment and consumable supplies Travel Publication costs Research funds for specific use of junior faculty Select up to 3 items from those you have checked in Column I and up to 3 items from Column II and rank in order of greatest priority. Column I Column II MAILING ADDRESS for COMPLETED QUESTIONNAIRE la Priority Ist PdoNq 2nd PrloNq 2nd Priority * * * PLEASE SIGN, DATE AND RETURN this questionnaire to: Committee on Research in the Life Sciences National Academy of Sciences 2101 Constitution Avenue, N.W. Washington, D. C. 20418 Use - Ace) EXHIBIT B-1 Questionnaire used in departmental survey. 3rd PrioNq 3rd Priodq Date

OCR for page 500
APPENDIX B 519 DEFINITIONS FULL-TIME FACULTY: Full-time (as defined by your institution) members of your department with an academic rank of Instructor or above and whose major responsibilities are concerned with the academic programs of the de- partment. INCLUDE: Yourself and all members of the continuing faculty, including those who were on leave but who are expected to return. Include those faculty who held joint appointments and who received the mapr portion of their professional salary from your department. EXCLUDE: Professors Emeritus, Senior or Continuing Research Associates and Voluntary Unpaid Staff. INSTRUCTOR: The lowest academic rank from which, following the usual promotional policies of your institu- tion, tenured faculty status may be acquired. CONTINUING OR SENIOR RESEARCH ASSOCIATE: Members of the continuing departmental research staff, on indefinite appointment who possess a doctoral degree. who are neither formally nor primarily involved in student instruction, and who are not on the academic promotion ladder in your institution. POSTDOCI~ORAL APPOINTEE: Temporary (1-3 years) appointments that offer opportunity for continued edu- cation and experience in research usually, though not necessarily. under the supervision of a faculty member. IN- CLUDED are appointments to holders of professional (doctoral) degrees who are pursuing research toward a second doctoral degree. EXCLUDED are service of teaching appointments, internships or residencies in which research training is not the primary purpose, and members of faculties of other institutions on sabbatical leave. GRADUATE STUDENTS: All potential MS degree or doctoral degree candidates who do not possess a professional doctoral degree and who spend 50 percent or more of their time fulfilling graduate degree requirements. POTENTIAL PhD CANDIDATES: all graduate students as defined above except those students specifically enrolled in or specifying interest in a terminal master degree program. SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS FOR QUESTION 20 INCLUDE 1) All laboratory space used on a year-round basis by the faculty, postdoctoral fellows and graduate stu- dents. 2) Common research facilities (cold rooms, instrument rooms, etc.) 3) Faculty and graduate student offices 4) Research museum space EXCLUDE I ) Space associated with formal teaching (lecture rooms, course laboratories, etc.) 2) Libraries 3) Greenhouses 4) Corridor space and other non-research space 5) Seasonal field and marine stations 6) Storage space for museum collections EXHIBIT B-2 Explanatory insert for departmental questionnaire.