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Biographical Sketches of Pane! Members and Staff ALBERT REES, president of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, was professor of economics and provost at Princeton University while he chaired the Panel. Formerly he taught economics at the University of Chicago. He served as director of the U.S. Council on Wage and Price Stability in 1974-1975 and was on the staff of the Council of Economic Advisers in 1954-1955. He has written extensively on wages and employment condi- tions. He received a B.A. from Oberlin College and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in economics from the University of Chicago. ROSANNE COLE iS manager of economic research and forecasting at the International Business Machines Corporation. Formerly she served on the staff of the National Bureau of Economic Research. Her work involves using econometric models in business planning and forecasting, and she has made detailed studies of errors in macroeconomic data and their effects on forecasts. She is a member of the American Eco- nomic Association. She received an A.B. from Miami University, Ohio, and a Ph.D. in economics from Columbia University. EDWARD F. DENISON, associate director for national economic accounts at the Bureau of Economic Analysis, U.S. Department of Commerce, was a senior fellow at Brookings Institution during the Panel's work. Prior to that time, he held positions with the Committee for Economic Development and the U.S. Department of Commerce. His work has included analysis of productivity and the sources of economic growth in 445

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446 Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff the major industrialized nations. He has participated actively in the Conference on Research in Income and Wealth and as a member of a number of advisory committees to the federal government on economic growth and related issues. He received an A.B. from Oberlin College and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Brown University. SOLOMON FABRICANT iS professor emeritus of economics, New York University. He was for many years director of the research staff at the National Bureau of Economic Research. He has had a career-long interest in economic statistics, productivity, and economic growth, and has participated in national and international activities concerned with economic development, economic statistics, and, in particular, the mea- surement of income and wealth. He was appointed to the National Committee on Productivity in 1974 and was a member of the President's Commission on Federal Statistics in 1970-1971. He received a B.S. degree from City College of New York and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Columbia University. JOHN A. FRECHTLING iS truck marketing research manager at the Ford Motor Company, where he has held a variety of marketing positions since 1956. His principal interests are cyclical movements in the auto- motive industry, determinants of competitive positions in the industry, and the interplay between economic growth and the industry. Before joining the Ford Motor Company, he was an economist with the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. He received a B.A. from Oberlin College and an M.A. from the School of Advanced Inter- national Studies of Johns Hopkins University, and he also studied at the University of Chicago. ROBERT ]. GORDON iS a professor of economics at Northwestern Univer- sity and also a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. Previously he taught economics at Harvard University and the University of Chicago. His principal interests are monetary economics and economic growth. His areas of research have included the theory of labor markets and inflation, sources of errors in measurement of prices, and explanations of inflation in historical U.S. and European data. He received a B.A. from both Harvard University and Oxford Uni- versity and a Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. PAUL W. HOLLAND is senior research scientist at the Educational Testing Service in Princeton, New Jersey. Formerly he was associate professor of statistics at Harvard University and a senior research associate at the

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Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff 447 National Bureau of Economic Research. His research includes the fields of multivariate analysis, robust statistics, and the application of statistics to the social sciences. He received a B.A. from the University of Michigan and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in statistics from Stanford University. BENJAMIN F. KING iS the Butterbaugh professor of quantitative methods at the School of Business Administration, University of Washington. Formerly he taught in the Graduate School of Business at the University of Chicago, where he also served as sampling director at the National Opinion Research Center. He is interested in the application of statistical methods to problems in all areas of business and economics, with particular interest in survey sampling. He is a member of the American Statistical Association and the International Association of Survey Statisticians. He received B.A., M.B.A., and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Chicago. G. S. MADDALA iS graduate research professor of economics at the University of Florida. Previously he taught at the University of Rochester and Stanford University. His principal interests are econometric methods and their applications and the analysis of economic statistics, fields in which he has written widely. He received a B.A. from Andhra University, an M.A. from the University of Bombay, and a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Chicago. He is a fellow of the Econometric Society and a member of the American Statistical Association. MARC L. NERLOVE iS Cook professor of economics at Northwestern University. Formerly he was a professor at the University of Minnesota, Stanford University, Yale University, and the University of Chicago in economics and agricultural economics. His work involves econometric methods, time-series analysis of categorical data with emphasis on the formulation and estimation of dynamic economic models, economic- demographic interactions in economic growth, and agricultural supply in developing economies. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and a fellow of the American Statistical Association, the Eco- nometric Society, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He participated in the Panel's work as a member of the Committee on National Statistics. He received a B.A. from the University of Chicago and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Johns Hopkins University. REGINALD NEWELL is director of research of the International Associa- tion of Machinists and Aerospace Workers (lAM). His work for the lAM has involved gathering, interpreting, and presenting economic data to be

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448 Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff used in collective bargaining; and he has represented the {AM on a number of committees of the U.S. Department of Labor's Labor Re- search Advisory Council. In addition to collective bargaining, he is interested in psychological testing and industrial relations. He is a member of the Industrial Relations Research Association. He received a B.A. in economics from the University of Buffalo and an M.A. in inter- national labor from American University. MARKLEY ROBERTS iS an economist with the AFL-CIO. His particular interests are productivity, economic growth, and the labor force. Prior to joining the research staff of the AFL-CIO in 1962, he was a legislative assistant in the office of Senator Hubert Humphrey and a reporter for the Washington Star. He has frequently participated in committees advising federal agencies on improving the statistics needed for collec- tive bargaining and economic analysis. He is a member of the American Economic Association and the Industrial Relations Research Associa- tion. He received a B.A. from Princeton University and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from American University. RICHARD RUGGLES iS Stanley Resor professor of economics at Yale University. He has devoted major attention to national economic ac- counts and their structure and analysis, and he has written widely in this field. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and of the Econometric Society, and a member of the Conference on Research in Income and Wealth, the International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, and the American Economic Association. He received B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. degrees in economics from Harvard University. W. RICHARD SCOTT iS professor of sociology and former chairman of the department of sociology at Stanford University. He has particular interests in social organization and administrative sciences and has written widely in these fields. He has engaged in considerable research on authority systems and control structures in organizations, with particular attention to medical institutions. He has served on the edi- torial boards of both sociological and administrative science journals. He is a fellow of the American Sociological Association, and a member of the Sociological Research Association and the Institute of Medicine. He received a B.A. from the University of Kansas and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Chicago. DAVE M. O NElLL, who is with the U.S. General Accounting Office, served as study director of the Panel's work. Previously he has been a

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Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff 449 member of the senior research staff of the Center for Naval Analysis, director of human resources studies for the American Enterprise Insti- tute,.associate professor of economics at the University of Pennsylvania, and research fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research. His research interests include human capital formation and earnings dif- ferentials. He is a member of the American Economic Association and the Industrial Relations Research Association. He received a B.A. from the City Collepe of New York and a Ph.D. in economics from Columbia University. - lOHN W. KENDRICK iS professor of economics at the George Washington University. Formerly he has been chief economist of the U.S. Depart- ment of Commerce, vice-president for economic research at the Con ference Board, and economist with a number of federal government agencies. He has worked and written extensively on economic statistics, particularly the measurement and analysis of productivity, economic accounts, and wealth. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Associa- tion and of the National Association of Business Economists and a member of the American Economic Association and several other profes- sional associations. He received B.A. and M.A. degrees from the Univer- sity of North Carolina and a Ph.D. from the George Washington Univer- sity. SHARON DE SHA served as staff associate to the Panel. Previously she was an instructor of economics at Grinnell College and at St. Lawrence University and a research assistant on a project estimating the wealth of American colonists. She received a B.A. from the University of Missouri and an M.A. in economics from Washington University.