Appendix H
Biographical Sketches Committee on Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research

James L. Wescoat, Jr., is an associate professor of geography and member of the Institute of Behavioral Sciences at the University of Colorado, Boulder. Dr. Wescoat served on the National Research Council's Committee on the Future of Irrigation in the Face of Competing Demands. His research interests include the historical and cultural geography of water management in the western U.S., and the spatial logic of western water law, policies, and institutions. He has conducted comparative analyses of water policy issues in the Colorado, Indus, and Aral Sea basins. Dr. Wescoat received his M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in geography from the University of Chicago.

Trudy A. Cameron is a professor of economics at the University of California, Los Angeles. Her research interests include recreation economics and contingent valuation methods related to recreation and water resource management. She serves on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Science Advisory Board's Environmental Economics Advisory Council. Dr. Cameron received her B.A. degree in economics from the University of British Columbia and her M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in economics from Princeton University. Dr. Cameron is also past vice-president of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists.



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Downstream: Adaptive Management of Glen Canyon Dam and the Colorado River Ecosystem Appendix H Biographical Sketches Committee on Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research James L. Wescoat, Jr., is an associate professor of geography and member of the Institute of Behavioral Sciences at the University of Colorado, Boulder. Dr. Wescoat served on the National Research Council's Committee on the Future of Irrigation in the Face of Competing Demands. His research interests include the historical and cultural geography of water management in the western U.S., and the spatial logic of western water law, policies, and institutions. He has conducted comparative analyses of water policy issues in the Colorado, Indus, and Aral Sea basins. Dr. Wescoat received his M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in geography from the University of Chicago. Trudy A. Cameron is a professor of economics at the University of California, Los Angeles. Her research interests include recreation economics and contingent valuation methods related to recreation and water resource management. She serves on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Science Advisory Board's Environmental Economics Advisory Council. Dr. Cameron received her B.A. degree in economics from the University of British Columbia and her M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in economics from Princeton University. Dr. Cameron is also past vice-president of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists.

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Downstream: Adaptive Management of Glen Canyon Dam and the Colorado River Ecosystem Suzanne K. Fish is an associate professor of anthropology at the University of Arizona and the curator of the Arizona State Museum in Tucson, Arizona. Dr. Fish is especially recognized for her expertise in ethnobotany. Dr. Fish received her B.A. degree from Rice University, and her M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Arizona. David Ford is the president of David Ford Consulting Engineers located in Sacramento, California. He is a lecturer at California State University, Sacramento, and at the University of California, Davis, and is a registered professional engineer in Texas, California, and Nevada. He has broad technical expertise and project experience in the areas of decision support systems, hydrologic engineering, water resource planning, natural resource policy analysis, hydropower operations and economics, and technology transfer. Dr. Ford received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in civil engineering from the University of Texas at Austin. Steven P. Gloss is an associate professor of zoology at the University of Wyoming. Dr. Gloss is the former director of the Wyoming Water Resources Center and has served as president of the National Institutes for Water Resources and the Powell Consortium, a regional organization dealing with issues relevant to the Colorado River Basin. His research interests include water resources policy and management, aquatic ecology, fisheries science, limnology, and general ecology. He received his Ph.D. degree from the University of New Mexico in biology working on an interdisciplinary NSF-RANN project focusing on the Colorado Plateau and Lake Powell. Timothy K. Kratz is a senior scientist at the Center for Limnology of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His research interests include limnology, wetland ecology, and long-term dynamics of ecological systems. He served on the National Research Council's Committee to Assess EPA's Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Project, and he is currently serving on the Long-Term Ecological Research Network's Executive Committee. He received his Ph.D. degree in botany from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Wendell L. Minckley is a professor of biology at Arizona State University, with current research interests in conservation biology,

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Downstream: Adaptive Management of Glen Canyon Dam and the Colorado River Ecosystem aquatic ecology, and ecological and systematic ichthyology. He has published about 200 technical works and trained more than 50 graduate students in these areas of interest on aquatic systems and biota in the southwestern United States and northern Mexico. He received his B.S. degree in zoology from Kansas State University, his M.A. degree in zoology (ichthyology) from the University of Kansas, and his Ph.D. degree in biology (aquatic/radiation ecology; minor geology) from the University of Louisville. Peter R. Wilcock is a professor in the department of geography and environmental engineering at The Johns Hopkins University. His research focuses on the mechanics of sediment transport and its application to problems of river erosion and sedimentation, on human impacts on river channel change, and on channel maintenance flows. In 1991–1993, Dr. Wilcock participated in an evaluation of trial reservoir releases for channel maintenance on the Trinity River, California. He received his B.S. degree in physical geography from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, and his M.S. degree in geomorphology from McGill University. Dr. Wilcock received his Ph.D. degree in geology from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Jeffrey W. Jacobs is a senior program officer at the National Research Council's Water Science and Technology Board. His research interests include institutional and policy arrangements for water resources planning and international cooperation in water development. He has studied these issues extensively in Southeast Asia's Mekong River Basin and has conducted comparative research between the Mekong and the Mississippi River systems. Dr. Jacobs received his Ph.D. degree in geography from the University of Colorado.