Appendix

Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

Warren R. Muir, Chair, is president of Hampshire Research Institute, Inc., a nonprofit organization in Alexandria, Virginia, and Hampshire Research Associates, Inc., a scientific and engineering consulting firm. Both organizations study issues relating to pollution prevention, risk assessment, and the use of data and information to promote environmental goals. He has held positions as senior staff member for environmental health for the Executive Office of the President, Council on Environmental Quality; deputy assistant administrator for testing and evaluation at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; and director of EPA's Office of Toxic Substances. Dr. Muir chaired the NRC Toxicology Information Committee, currently serves as a member of BEST, and has served on several other committees. He received a B.A. in chemistry from Amherst College and M.S. and Ph.D. in chemistry from Northwestern University.

R. Rhodes Trussell, Vice-Chair, is the lead drinking water technologist and director for corporate development at Montgomery Watson, Inc. Dr. Trussell serves on the EPA Science Advisory Board's Committee on Drinking Water. He has served on several NRC committees and is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Dr. Trussell received his B.S. in civil engineering and his M.S. and Ph.D. in sanitary engineering from the University of California, Berkeley.

Frank J. Bove is a senior epidemiologist for the Epidemiology and Surveillance Branch of the Division of Health Studies, Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. Dr. Bove has published several papers and reports on the epidemiology of exposure to drinking water contaminants and related adverse health effects. He received a B.A. in political science and philosophy from the University of Pennsylvania and an M.S. in environmental health science and an Sc.D. in epidemiology from the Harvard School of Public Health.

Lawrence J. Fischer is a professor in the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology and is the director of the Institute for Environmental Toxicology at Michigan State University. His primary research interest is biochemical toxicology. Specific research includes absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of drugs and chemicals and toxicity of chemicals to the endocrine pancreas (gland). Dr. Fischer received his B.S. and



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--> Appendix Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff Warren R. Muir, Chair, is president of Hampshire Research Institute, Inc., a nonprofit organization in Alexandria, Virginia, and Hampshire Research Associates, Inc., a scientific and engineering consulting firm. Both organizations study issues relating to pollution prevention, risk assessment, and the use of data and information to promote environmental goals. He has held positions as senior staff member for environmental health for the Executive Office of the President, Council on Environmental Quality; deputy assistant administrator for testing and evaluation at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; and director of EPA's Office of Toxic Substances. Dr. Muir chaired the NRC Toxicology Information Committee, currently serves as a member of BEST, and has served on several other committees. He received a B.A. in chemistry from Amherst College and M.S. and Ph.D. in chemistry from Northwestern University. R. Rhodes Trussell, Vice-Chair, is the lead drinking water technologist and director for corporate development at Montgomery Watson, Inc. Dr. Trussell serves on the EPA Science Advisory Board's Committee on Drinking Water. He has served on several NRC committees and is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Dr. Trussell received his B.S. in civil engineering and his M.S. and Ph.D. in sanitary engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. Frank J. Bove is a senior epidemiologist for the Epidemiology and Surveillance Branch of the Division of Health Studies, Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. Dr. Bove has published several papers and reports on the epidemiology of exposure to drinking water contaminants and related adverse health effects. He received a B.A. in political science and philosophy from the University of Pennsylvania and an M.S. in environmental health science and an Sc.D. in epidemiology from the Harvard School of Public Health. Lawrence J. Fischer is a professor in the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology and is the director of the Institute for Environmental Toxicology at Michigan State University. His primary research interest is biochemical toxicology. Specific research includes absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of drugs and chemicals and toxicity of chemicals to the endocrine pancreas (gland). Dr. Fischer received his B.S. and

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--> M.S. in pharmacology from the University of Illinois and his Ph.D. in pharmaceutical chemistry from the University of California, San Francisco. Walter Giger is a professor and senior scientist in the Chemistry Department at the Swiss Federal Institute of Environmental Science and Technology. His research, teaching, and consulting activities focus on organic compounds in the environment and in the geosphere. Research topics include development of analytical techniques for identification of organic pollutants in drinking water, wastewater, and natural waters; investigation of sources, occurrences, and fate of organic pollutants in wastewater and drinking water, and evaluation of chemical, physical, and biological processes that determine the environmental fate of chemicals. Dr. Giger received his B.S. and Ph.D. in chemistry from ETH Zurich. Branden B. Johnson is a research scientist in the Division of Science and Research at the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. His research interests and work activities include broad areas of risk communication, risk perception, natural and technological hazard management, and environmental policy. Dr. Johnson is currently involved in research related to the Consumer Confidence Report requirements of the Safe Drinking Water Act Amendments of 1996 and public reaction to information on Cryptosporidium in drinking water. He received a B.A. in environmental values and behavior from the University of Hawaii, Manoa, and an M.A. in environmental affairs (water resources) and a Ph.D. in geography from Clark University. Nancy K. Kim is director of the Division of Environmental Health Assessment of the New York State Department of Health and is an associate professor in the School of Public Health at the State University of New York, Albany. Her research interests include chemical risk assessment, exposure assessment, toxicological evaluations, structural activity relationships, and quantitative relationships among toxicological parameters. She received her B.A. in chemistry from the University of Delaware and her M.S. and Ph.D. in chemistry from Northwestern University. Michael J. McGuire is president and founder of McGuire Environmental Consultants, Inc., in Santa Monica, California. The firm provides consulting services to public water utilities and industries in the areas of Safe Drinking Water Act compliance and water treatment optimization. Prior to forming his own corporation, he was assistant general manager of the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California. Dr. McGuire received his B.S. in civil engineering from the University of Pennsylvania and his M.S. and Ph.D. in environmental engineering from Drexel University. David M. Ozonoff is a professor in and chair of the Department of Environmental Health in Boston University's School of Public Health. His research work centers on health effects to communities of various kinds of exposures to toxic chemicals; new approaches to understanding the results of small case-control studies; and the effects of exposure misclassification in environmental epidemiology. He has studied public health effects resulting from exposure to a number of contaminated sites. Dr. Ozonoff received his M.D. from Cornell University in 1967 and his M.P.H. from The Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health in 1968. Catherine A. Peters is an assistant professor in the Program of Environmental Engineering and Water Resources in the Department of Civil

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--> Engineering and Operations Research at Princeton University. Her research interests include the behavior of multicomponent organic contaminants in the environment, with particular emphasis on non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs); innovative mathematical modeling approaches for characterization of chemical heterogeneity of pollutants; and risk-based decision making for complex multicomponent contaminants. She received her B.S.E. in chemical engineering from the University of Michigan and her M.S. in civil engineering and Ph.D. in civil engineering/engineering and public policy from Carnegie Mellon University. Joan B. Rose is a professor in the Marine Science Department at the University of South Florida. Her research interests include methods for detection of pathogens in wastewater and the environment; water treatment for removal of pathogens; wastewater reuse; and occurrence of viruses and parasites in wastewater sludge. Dr. Rose served on NRC's Committee on Wastewater Management for Coastal Urban Areas and the Committee on Potable Water Reuse. She received a B.S. in microbiology from the University of Arizona, an M.S. in microbiology from the University of Wyoming, and a Ph.D. in microbiology from the University of Arizona. Philip C. Singer is a professor in and director of the Water Resources Engineering Program at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Dr. Singer was formerly a member of NRC's Water Science and Technology Board and served on the Committee on U.S. Geological Survey Water Resources Research. A member of the National Academy of Engineering, he has published dozens of papers and reports principally concerned with aspects of water chemistry and drinking water quality. He received his M.S. and Ph.D. in environmental sciences and engineering from Harvard University. Deborah L. Swackhamer is an associate professor in the Division of Environmental and Occupational Health in the School of Public Health at the University of Minnesota. Her research involves assessment of contaminants in the environment and associated risks to public health and the environment. She has published dozens of papers on topics ranging from inventories of xenobiotic organic compounds in the Great Lakes, to analytical methods for contaminant detection, to bioaccumulation of organochlorine compounds in fish and multimedia approaches for modeling human exposure. She has served on the executive committee of the Division of Environmental Chemistry of the American Chemical Society, the Board of Directors of the International Association for Great Lakes Research, and the Science Advisory Committee of EPA's Great Waters program. She was a member of the National Research Council's Committee on Coastal Oceans. Dr. Swackhamer received her M.S. in water chemistry and her Ph.D. in oceanography and limnology from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Paul G. Tratnyek is an associate professor in the Department of Environmental Science and Engineering and the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the Oregon Graduate Institute of Science and Technology. He is also an affiliated scientist with the Center for Coastal and Land-Margin

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--> Research and the Center for Groundwater Research. His research primarily involves a wide range of oxidation-reduction reactions that can occur in the environment and the contribution of these reactions to the fate of organic pollutants. Examples include oxidations by chlorine dioxide and oxidations of gasoline oxygenates, such as MTBE. Dr. Tratnyek received his B.A. in chemistry from Williams College and his Ph.D. in applied chemistry from the Colorado School of Mines. Staff Jacqueline A. MacDonald is associate director of the NRC Water Science and Technology Board. She directed the studies that led to the reports Innovations in Ground Water and Soil Cleanup; Alternatives for Ground Water Cleanup; In Situ Bioremediation: When Does It Work?; Safe Water From Every Tap: Improving Water Service to Small Communities; and Freshwater Ecosystems: Revitalizing Educational Programs in Limnology . She received the 1996 National Research Council Award for Distinguished Service. Ms. MacDonald earned an M.S. degree in environmental science in civil engineering from the University of Illinois, where she received a university graduate fellowship and an Avery Brundage scholarship, and a B.S. degree magna cum laude in mathematics from Bryn Mawr College. Carol A. Maczka, Ph.D., is the director of toxicology and risk assessment at the NRC Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology. She received her Ph.D. in pharmacology from the George Washington University, with a minor in the metabolism of xenobiotics. She received a B.A. from the State University of New York at Stony Brook in 1973. Dr. Maczka directed the studies that led to the following reports: Assessment of Exposure-Response Functions for Rocket-Emission Toxicants; Toxicological and Performance Aspects of Oxygenated Motor Vehicle Fuels; and Nitrates and Nitrites in Drinking Water. Other current projects include: Arsenic in Drinking Water; Hormonally Active Agents in the Environment; Developmental Toxicology; and Strategies To Protect the Health of Deployed U.S. Forces. Mark C. Gibson is a research associate at the NRC Water Science and Technology Board. He received his B.S. in biology from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University and M.S. in environmental science and policy in biology from George Mason University. Mr. Gibson helped organize the workshop, schedule workshop participants, and prepare and edit this report. Kimberly A. Swartz is a project assistant with the NRC Water Science and Technology Board. She assisted the staff and committee in producing the final draft of this report. She has a B.S. in sociology from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University.