APPENDIX C
Biographical Sketches

REBECCA M.BLANK is Dean of the Gerald R.Ford School of Public Policy, Henry Carter Adams Collegiate Professor of Public Policy, and Professor of Economics at the University of Michigan. Prior to going to Michigan, she served as a Member of the President’s Council of Economic Advisers from 1997–1999. Professor Blank’s research has focused on the interaction between the macroeconomy, government anti-poverty programs, and the behavior and well-being of low-income families.

ALFRED BLUMSTEIN is a University Professor and the J.Erik Jonsson Professor of Operations Research, and former Dean of the H.John Heinz III School of Public Policy and Management, of Carnegie Mellon University. His research related to crime and punishment has covered issues of criminal careers, deterrence and incapacitation, sentencing, incarceration practice and policy, racial disproportionality, youth violence, and demographic trends. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1998.

LAWRENCE D.BOBO is Professor of Sociology and Afro-American Studies at Harvard University. Prior to joining the faculty at Harvard he was Professor of Sociology at the University of California, Los Angeles, where he directed the Center for Research on Race, Politics & Society. He is coauthor of Racial Attitudes in America: Trends and Interpretations, which won the 1986 Scholarly Achievement Award of the North Central Sociological Association. His research interests include racial attitudes and relations, social psychology, public opinion, and political behavior.



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America Becoming: Racial Trends and Their Consequences, Volume I APPENDIX C Biographical Sketches REBECCA M.BLANK is Dean of the Gerald R.Ford School of Public Policy, Henry Carter Adams Collegiate Professor of Public Policy, and Professor of Economics at the University of Michigan. Prior to going to Michigan, she served as a Member of the President’s Council of Economic Advisers from 1997–1999. Professor Blank’s research has focused on the interaction between the macroeconomy, government anti-poverty programs, and the behavior and well-being of low-income families. ALFRED BLUMSTEIN is a University Professor and the J.Erik Jonsson Professor of Operations Research, and former Dean of the H.John Heinz III School of Public Policy and Management, of Carnegie Mellon University. His research related to crime and punishment has covered issues of criminal careers, deterrence and incapacitation, sentencing, incarceration practice and policy, racial disproportionality, youth violence, and demographic trends. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1998. LAWRENCE D.BOBO is Professor of Sociology and Afro-American Studies at Harvard University. Prior to joining the faculty at Harvard he was Professor of Sociology at the University of California, Los Angeles, where he directed the Center for Research on Race, Politics & Society. He is coauthor of Racial Attitudes in America: Trends and Interpretations, which won the 1986 Scholarly Achievement Award of the North Central Sociological Association. His research interests include racial attitudes and relations, social psychology, public opinion, and political behavior.

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America Becoming: Racial Trends and Their Consequences, Volume I FRANK BONILLA is Thomas Hunter Professor of Sociology, Emeritus, at Hunter College of the City University of New York. From 1973 to 1993 Dr. Bonilla was the director of C.U.N.Y.’s Centro de Estudios Puertorriquenos and Professor in C.U.N.Y.’s Ph.D. Programs in Sociology and Political Science. Professor Bonilla’s current research, writing, and advocacy efforts are focused on promoting a vitalization of Latino academic and policy research capabilities. THOMAS D.BOSTON is a Professor of Economics in the School of Economics at Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta and the owner of Boston Research Group, an Atlanta-based consulting company. Dr. Boston has consulted for dozens of public agencies and private companies and is recognized as one of the country’s most knowledgeable experts on minority business issues. JOHN SIBLEY BUTLER holds The Gale Chair in Entrepreneurship and Small Business in the Graduate School of Business (Department of Management) at the University of Texas. He is Chair of the Management Department and holds a joint appointment in Organizational Behavior in the College of Liberal Arts (Sociology). His research is in the areas of organizational behavior, entrepreneurship/new ventures, and general race relations. ALBERT CAMARILLO is a Professor of American History and Director of the Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity at Stanford University. He is a past director of the Inter-University Program for Latino Research and the Stanford Center for Chicano Research. In his research, Professor Camarillo has examined the origins of the Chicano civil rights movement, as well as settlement, labor, and immigration patterns in urbanized populations. CECILIA A.CONRAD is an Associate Professor of Economics at Pomona College in Claremont, California. Prior to joining the faculty at Pomona, Professor Conrad taught at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, and at Barnard College, Columbia University, New York. Her research focuses on the economics of inequality and of the family. CHRISTOPHER EDLEY, JR, is a Professor at Harvard Law School and the Co-Diretor of the Harvard Civil Rights Project. He served as Senior Advisor to President Clinton for the Race Initiative. His acaemic work is primarily in administrative law, but has also included civil rights, federalism, budget policy, and national security law.

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America Becoming: Racial Trends and Their Consequences, Volume I RONALD F.FERGUSON is Lecturer in Public Policy at the John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, and Senior Research Associate at the Wiener Center for Social Policy, Harvard University. He is also currently a Visiting Scholar at the College Board.. His research and publications include the effects of teacher quality and other school resources on test scores in public primary and secondary schools; the effects of school quality, parenting practices, and youth culture on the Black-White achievement gap; the influence of technology and other factors on changes in the demand for low-skilled workers; and various other issues related to the quality of life in cities. PETER T.GOTTSCHALK is Professor of Economics at Boston College. He is currently a Research Affiliate at the Institute for Research on Poverty at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and was previously a Russell Sage Foundation Visiting Scholar and a Brookings Economic Policy Fellow. Professor Gottschalk’s main area of research is labor economics, with a special emphasis on income distribution and poverty issues. DARNELL F.HAWKINS is Professor of African-American Studies, Sociology, and Criminal Justice at the University of Illinois in Chicago. He has conducted research on racial disproportionality in the American prison system, homicide patterns and violence as a public-health problem, and public perceptions of crime and punishment. HARRY J.HOLZER is Professor of Public Policy at Georgetown University. He is also a Senior Affiliate of the Joint Center for Poverty Research (University of Chicago and Northwestern University), Research Affiliate of the Institute for Research on Poverty (University of Wisconsin), and a former Chief Economist at the U.S. Department of Labor. Dr. Holzer has written extensively on the labor market problems of minorities and the urban poor. RENÉE R.JENKINS is a Professor and the Chairman of the Department of Pediatrics and Child Health at Howard University. Dr. Jenkins was the first director of Adolescent Medicine in the Department of Pediatrics and Child Health at Howard University and is a past President of the Society for Adolescent Medicine. Her publications and presentations range from adolescent health and sexuality to violence prevention and health issues of minority children. RANDALL KENNEDY is a Professor at Harvard Law School, where he teaches courses on contracts, freedom of expression, and the regulation of

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America Becoming: Racial Trends and Their Consequences, Volume I race relations. His recent book, Race, Crime and the Law, won the 1998 Robert F.Kennedy Book Prize. RAYNARD S.KINGTON is a Research Medical Officer at the National Center for Health Statistics (N.C.H.S.), where he works primarily on the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Prior to joining N.C.H.S. in 1997, he was a Senior Scientist in the Social Policy Department at RAND. Dr. Kington’s research has focused on the relationships between race, socioeconomic position, and health status, especially in older populations. BETSY LOZOFF, a behavioral pediatrician, is Director of the Center for Human Growth and Development and Professor of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases at the University of Michigan. Her research, teaching, and patient care use a cross-cultural perspective to understand common pediatric issues related to behavior and development. Her major research focus is on iron deficiency and infant development. ANTHONY MARX is Associate Professor of Political Science at Columbia University. His research focuses on comparative race relations and includes extensive work in South Africa, Brazil, and the U.S. South. Professor Marx’s book, Making Race and Nation, won the 1999 Ralph Bunche Award of the American Political Science Association and the 2000 Barrington Moore Prize of the American Sociological Association. DOUGLAS S.MASSEY is the Dorothy Swaine Thomas Professor of Sociology at the University of Pennsylvania and Chair of its Sociology Department. He is co-author of the book American Apartheid: Segregation and the Making of the Underclass, which won the Distinguished Publication Award of the American Sociological Association, the Otis Dudley Duncan Award of the Section on the Sociology of Population, and the Critics’ Choice Award of the American Educational Studies Association. Professor Massey has also published extensively on U.S.-Mexico migration. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. VONNIE C.McLOYD is a Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Michigan in addition to holding a research scientist appointment in the Center for Human Growth and Development. Dr. McLoyd is a developmental psychologist whose primary research objective is to develop and test models of the processes by which economic hardship (i.e., poverty, parental job loss, parental income loss) affects children’s development, with a special focus on development in African

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America Becoming: Racial Trends and Their Consequences, Volume I American children. She received a MacArthur “Genius” Fellowship in 1996. FAITH MITCHELL is Director of the Division on Social and Economic Studies of the Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. She is co-editor of Premature Death in the New Independent States (National Academy Press, 1997) and Governance and Opportunity in Metropolitan America (National Academy Press, 1999). ROBERT A.MOFFITT is Professor of Economics at Johns Hopkins University. He is affiliated with the Institute for Research on Poverty, the Joint Center on Poverty Research, and the Harvard Program on Inequality and Social Policy. He currently chairs the NRC Panel on Data and Methods for the Evaluation of Welfare Reform and is a member of CBASSE. He is a co-Principal Investigator of the Three-City Study, a major interdisciplinary study of welfare reform. His research focuses on the effects of the U.S. welfare system on employment, income, family structure, and other behaviors, and on the economics of the low-income population in general CHARLES MOSKOS is a Professor of Sociology at Northwestern University. His current research deals with race relations in the Army and what lessons that experience may have for civilian society. DON T.NAKANISHI is a Professor and the Director of the U.C.L.A. Asian American Studies Center. He is the author of numerous books, articles, and policy reports that have focused on topics of access, representation, and influence of Asian Pacific Americans and other ethnic and racial groups in American political, educational, and social institutions. He was appointed by President Clinton to the Civil Liberties Public Education Board. HERBERT W.NICKENS was Vice-President and Director of the Division of Community and Minority Programs at the Association of American Medical Colleges when he died in 1999. EUGENE Z.ODDONE is Director of the Center for Health Services Research in Primary Care at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Durham, North Carolina; Chief of the Division of General Internal Medicine at Duke University Medical Center; and Associate Director of Epidemiology Research and the Information Center at V.A.M.C. His research interests include evaluation of the effectiveness and delivery of ambulatory care with emphasis on hospital readmission and health care cost, assessing the

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America Becoming: Racial Trends and Their Consequences, Volume I reason for racial disparities in the use and outcomes of health care, evaluation of house staff training, and primary care for H.I.V.-infected patients. MELVIN L.OLIVER is Vice President of the Asset Building and Community Development Program at the Ford Foundation. From 1978 to 1996 he was a member of the faculty at U.C.L.A., teaching at both the graduate and undergraduate levels. An expert on racial and urban inequality and poverty, Dr. Oliver is the author (with Thomas M.Shapiro) of Black Wealth/White Wealth: A New Perspective on Racial Inequality, which has received the Distinguished Scholarly Publication Award from the American Sociological Association, the C.Wright Mills Award from the Society for the Study of Social Problems, and the award for the Outstanding Book on the subject of human rights from the Gustavus Myers Center for the Study of Human Rights in North America. MICHAEL A.OMI is Professor of Comparative Ethnic Studies at the University of California, Berkeley. He has written about racial theory and politics, Asian Americans and race relations, right-wing political movements, and race and popular culture. MANUEL PASTOR is Professor of Latin American and Latino Studies and Director of the Center for Justice, Tolerance, and Community at UC Santa Cruz. He has conducted research on Latin American economic issues and U.S. urban issues, and is currently involved in a multi-year project on community-based environmental justice movements. LAURA A.PETERSEN is a health care researcher at the Houston Center for Quality of Care and Utilization Studies and the Center to Study Racial and Ethnic Variations in Medical Interactions at the Houston Veterans Affairs Medical Center (funded by the Agency for Health Care Research and Quality and the National Institutes of Health Office of Minority Health). Her research interests include racial disparities in the use and outcomes of cardiovascular care, as well as the relationship between health care financing mechanisms and acess to health care. GARY D.SANDEFUR is Professor of Sociology and member of the Center for Demography and Ecology at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Most of his publications deal with issues at the intersection of race and ethnicity, social demography, and public policy. His co-authors, Molly Martin, Jennifer Eggerling, Susan Mannon, and Ann Meier are graduate students in sociology at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Martin has interests in social demography, poverty, and welfare policy; Eggerling specializes in race and ethnicity and social psychology; Mannon

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America Becoming: Racial Trends and Their Consequences, Volume I studies agricultural development and change in Central America; and Meier studies social capital and family and education outcomes. THOMAS M.SHAPIRO is Professor of Sociology and Anthropology at Northeastern University. His primary interest is in racial inequality. With Dr. Melvin Oliver, he wrote Black Wealth/White Wealth, which was awarded the 1995 C.Wright Mills Award by the Society for the Study of Social Problems, named an Outstanding Book of 1996 by the Gustavus Myers Center for the Study of Human Rights in North America, and received the 1997 Distinguished Scholarly Publication Award from the American Sociological Association. NEIL J.SMELSER is Director of the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, Stanford, California. From 1958 to 1994 he was on the faculty of Sociology of the University of California, Berkeley, serving as University Professor since 1971. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Philosophical Society, and the National Academy of Sciences. JAMES P.SMITH holds the RAND Chair in Labor Markets and Demographic Studies and was the Director of RAND’s Labor and Population Studies Program from 1977 to 1994. He has led numerous projects, including studies of immigration, the economics of aging, Black-White wages and employment, the effects of economic development on labor markets, wealth accumulation and savings behavior, and the interrelation of health and economic status among the elderly. CAROL M.SWAIN is Professor of Law and Professor, Political Science at Vanderbilt University. She is the author of Black Faces, Black Interests: The Representation of African Americans in Congress, which was selected by Library Choice Journal as one of the seven outstanding academic books of 1994, was the winner of the 1994 Woodrow Wilson prize given to “the best book published in the United States during the prior year on government, politics or international affairs,” co-winner of the V.O.Key Award for the best book published on southern politics, and the winner of the 1995 D.B.Hardeman prize for the best scholarly work on the U.S. Congress during a biennial period. RUSSELL THORNTON is Professor of Anthropology at the University of California at Los Angeles. Born and raised in Oklahoma, he is a registered member of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma. Since 1990 he has been chair of the Smithsonian Institution’s Native American Repatriation

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America Becoming: Racial Trends and Their Consequences, Volume I Review Committee. He has published six books and some 60 articles and book chapters. MORRIS WEINBERGER is Director of Health Services Research at Roudebush Veterans’ Affairs Medical Center. He is also a Professor of Medicine at the Indiana University School of Medicine and a Senior Investigator at the Regenstrief Institute for Health Care. His research interests include improved treatment of chronic medical conditions. DAVID R.WILLIAMS is a Professor of Sociology, a Senior Research Scientist at the Institute for Social Research, and a Faculty Associate in the African American Mental Health Research Center and the Center for Afro-American and African Studies at the University of Michigan. His research focuses on socioeconomic status and health, and the health of the African American population. His publications examine how racism, social support, religious involvement, and health behaviors can affect health. His current research is examining the ways in which experiences of discrimination affect both physical and mental health. WILLIAM JULIUS WILSON is Lewis P. and Linda L.Geyser University Professor at Harvard University. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the National Academy of Education, and the American Philosophical Society, and a fellow of the American Academy of Political and Social Science. Professor Wilson is a member of numerous national boards and commissions, including the President’s Commission on White House Fellowships, The Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, and the Century Foundation. His book, When Work Disappears: The World of the New Urban Poor, was selected as one of the notable books of 1996 by the editors of the New York Times Book Review, and received the Sidney Hillman Foundation Award. He received the National Medal of Science in 1998. MIN ZHOU is Professor of Sociology at the University of California, Los Angeles. Her main areas of research are immigration and immigrant adaptation, race/ethnicity, ethnic economies, the community, and urban sociology. Currently, she is doing research in immigrant communities in downtown Los Angeles examining how neighborhood environment influences parent-child and peer-group relations, children’s after-school life, and their current academic and future occupational aspirations.