Appendix C
Biographical Sketches

THOMAS A. KOCHAN (Co-chair) is the George M. Bunker professor of management at the Sloan School of Management of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He came to MIT from Cornell University, where he was on the faculty of the School of Industrial and Labor Relations from 1973 to 1980. He has served as a third-party mediator, fact finder, and arbitrator and as a consultant to a variety of government and private-sector organizations and labor-management groups. He has done research on a variety of topics related to industrial relations and human resource management in the public and private sector. His recent books include: After Lean Production: Evolving Employment Practices in the World Auto Industry; Managing for the Future: Organizational Behavior and Processes; Employment Relations in a Changing World Economy; Human Resource Management in Asian Economies; The Mutual Gains Enterprise; Transforming Organizations; An Introduction to Collective Bargaining and Industrial Relations; and The Transformation of American Industrial Relations. In 1988 the Transformation of American Industrial Relations received the annual award from the Academy of Management for the best scholarly book on management. He has a Ph.D. in industrial relations from the University of Wisconsin, Madison.



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Appendix C Biographical Sketches THOMAS A. KOCHAN (Co-chair) is the George M. Bunker professor of management at the Sloan School of Management of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He came to MIT from Cornell University, where he was on the faculty of the School of Industrial and Labor Relations from 1973 to 1980. He has served as a third-party mediator, fact finder, and arbitrator and as a consultant to a variety of government and private-sector organizations and labor-management groups. He has done research on a variety of topics related to industrial relations and human resource management in the public and private sector. His recent books include: After Lean Production: Evolving Employment Practices in the World Auto Industry; Managing for the Future: Organizational Behavior and Processes; Employment Relations in a Changing World Economy; Human Resource Management in Asian Economies; The Mutual Gains Enterprise; Transforming Organizations; An Introduction to Collective Bargaining and Industrial Relations; and The Transformation of American Industrial Relations. In 1988 the Transformation of American Industrial Relations received the annual award from the Academy of Management for the best scholarly book on management. He has a Ph.D. in industrial relations from the University of Wisconsin, Madison.

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STEPHEN R. BARLEY (Co-Chair) is professor of industrial engineering and engineering management and the co-director of the Center for Work, Technology and Organization at Stanford University's School of Engineering. Prior to going to Stanford in 1994, Barley served for 10 years on the faculty of the School of Industrial and Labor Relations at Cornell University. He has a Ph.D. in organization studies from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He teaches courses on the management of research and development, the organizational implications of technological change, organizational behavior, social network analysis, and ethnographic field methods. He has written extensively on the impact of new technologies on work, the organization of technical work, and organizational culture. He recently edited a volume on technical work, entitled Between Craft and Science: Technical Work in the United States. He has served as a consultant to organizations in a variety of industries, including publishing, banking, electronics, and aerospace. He is currently working on a multipronged study of contingent work among engineers and software developers in the Silicon Valley. ROSEMARY BATT is assistant professor of human resource studies at the Industrial and Labor Relations School of Cornell University. She has a B.A. from Cornell University and a Ph.D. from the Sloan School of Management, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Her research interests include service-sector productivity and competitiveness, strategic human resource management, work design and technology use, and white-collar careers. She has written extensively on the restructuring of the telecommunications and information services industry. She is coauthor of The New American Workplace: Transforming Work Systems in the United States. NICOLE WOOLSEY BIGGART is professor of management and sociology at the University of California, Davis. Her research has been concerned largely with the social structure bases of economic organizations. Her book, Charismatic Capitalism: Direct Selling Organizations in America, examined the ways in which the direct selling industry makes economic use of the social relations of distributors. She has written about the network relations of the Japa-

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nese, South Korean, and Taiwanese economies and is the author (with Gary Hamilton and Marco Orru) of Economic Organization of East Asia . Her publications have appeared in the American Journal of Sociology , Administrative Science Quarterly, Social Problems, and elsewhere. She is chair of the organizations, occupations, and work section of the American Sociological Association. In 1996 she was the Arthur Andersen distinguished visitor at the Judge Institute of Management Studies, Cambridge University, England. She has a Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley. PETER CAPPELLI is professor of management and director of The Wharton School's Center for Human Resources. He has degrees in industrial relations from Cornell University and in labor economics from Oxford, where he was a Fulbright scholar. His research has examined labor relations, changes in work and the effects on skill requirements, the contribution of workplace attitudes and behaviors to job-related skills, and the effects on workforce skills associated with choices of employment practices. His book Change at Work describes how the restructuring of American industry has created changes in the employment relationship for the National Planning Association, and The New Deal at Work outlines the management challenges that emerge in the absence of long-term employment commitments. He is currently conducting a study of the determinants of financial performance in the life insurance industry and a longitudinal study of the relationship between employment practices and firm performance based on data collection with the U.S. Bureau of the Census. MARK J. EITELBERG is professor of public policy and associate chair for research in the Department of Systems Management at the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California. He joined the faculty in 1982 after serving as a senior scientist with the Human Resources Research Organization for seven years. He has directed numerous research projects for the Department of Defense and the military services since the mid-1970s and is recognized internationally as a leading scholar in military manpower policy. He is the author or coauthor of more than 100 publications, referenced widely in defense literature. He has served as a

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consultant and author with several government commissions, defense agencies, and private organizations, including the Brookings Institution, the Atlantic Council of the United States, the RAND Corporation, and the Center for Strategic and International Studies, among others. He is editor of Armed Forces and Society, the official journal of the Inter-University Seminar on Armed Forces and Society. He has a Ph.D. in public administration (public policy and national security) from New York University. ANN HOWARD is manager of assessment technology integrity for Development Dimensions International, a leading human resource development firm with over 70 offices and affiliates around the world. Her responsibilities include assuring quality in assessment technologies and providing continuing education for staffing and assessment consultants. Her professional experience includes being president of the Leadership Research Institute, a nonprofit organization that she co-founded in 1987. She was formerly with AT&T, where for 12 years she directed two longitudinal studies of the lives and careers of managers. She has a Ph.D. from the University of Maryland and an M.S. degree from San Francisco State University, both in industrial-organizational psychology. She is the author of more than 75 publications on topics such as assessment centers, management selection, managerial careers, and leadership. She is the senior author (with Douglas W. Bray) of Managerial Lives in Transition: Advancing Age and Changing Times and the editor of The Changing Nature of Work and Diagnosis for Organizational Change: Methods and Models. ARNE L. KALLEBERG is Kenan professor of sociology, and chair of the Department of Sociology at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. He is also an adjunct professor of management in the Kenan-Flagler School of Business at the University of North Carolina and a fellow of the Carolina Population Center. He has a Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. His current research focuses on the changing nature of employment relations in the United States and Norway, organizations' increasing use of flexible staffing arrangements (especially in the health care industry), and the nature and consequences of high-performance work

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organizations. He has written over 75 articles and chapters, and has coauthored four books, dealing with research topics related to the sociology of work, organizations, occupations and industries, labor markets, and social stratification. His research has been supported by the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation, the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, the Russell Sage Foundation, the National Science Foundation, the Spencer Foundation, the Japan Foundation, and the Norwegian Research Council. ANNE MAVOR is the study director for the Committee on Techniques for the Enhancement of Human Performance: Occupational Analysis. She is also currently the staff director for the Committee on Human Factors and the Panel on Musculoskeletal Disorders and the Workplace. Her previous work as a National Research Council senior staff officer has included studies on modeling human behavior and command decision making, human factors in air traffic control automation, human factors considerations in tactical display for soldiers, scientific and technological challenges of virtual reality, emerging needs and opportunities for human factors research, and modeling cost and performance for purposes of military enlistment. For the past 25 years, her work has concentrated on human factors, cognitive psychology, and information system design. Prior to joining the National Research Council she worked for the Essex Corporation, a human factors research firm, and served as a consultant to the College Board. She has an M.S. in experimental psychology from Purdue University. JAMES P. McGEE is a senior research associate at the National Research Council. He currently supports the Committee on Techniques for the Enhancement of Human Performance: Occupational Analysis, the Panel on Musculoskeletal Disorders and the Workplace, and the Army Research Laboratory Technical Assessment Board. In addition, he is study director for the Committee on Educational Interventions for Autistic Children. Since 1994 he has supported panels on education and on human factors psychology in such areas as occupational analysis, air traffic control, and military research in human factors. Prior to joining the National Research Council, he held scientific, technical, and man-

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agement positions in human factors psychology at IBM, RCA, General Electric, General Dynamics, and United Technologies corporations. He has also taught courses in applied psychology at several colleges and is a member of the Potomac Chapter of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. He has a Ph.D. in experimental psychology from Fordham University. DAVID NEUMARK is professor of economics at Michigan State University and a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research. He has a bachelors degree in economics from the University of Pennsylvania and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Harvard University, with a specialization in labor economics and econometrics. He worked at the Federal Reserve Board and the University of Pennsylvania before coming to Michigan State in 1994. His current research interests cover job stability, minimum wages, affirmative action, discrimination, aging, and supplemental security income. PAUL OSTERMAN is professor of human resources and management at the Sloan School of Management of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is the author of three books: Getting Started: The Youth Labor Market, Employment Futures: Reorganization, Dislocation, and Public Policy, and Making America Work; the coauthor of The Mutual Gains Enterprise, Forging a Winning Partnership Among Labor, Management, and Government, and the editor of two books, Internal Labor Markets and Broken Ladders: Managerial Careers in the New Economy. In addition, he has written numerous academic journal articles and policy issue papers on such topics as labor market policy, job training programs, economic development, antipoverty programs, and the organization of work within firms. He has been a senior administrator of job training programs for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and consulted widely for government agencies, foundations, community groups, and public interest organizations. He has a Ph.D. in economics from MIT. NORMAN G. PETERSON is senior research fellow at the American Institutes for Research (AIR). He has B.A. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Minnesota in psychology, specializing in

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industrial and organizational psychology. Prior to joining AIR, he was vice-president of the Personnel Decisions Research Institute. He is a fellow of the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology, the American Psychological Association, and the American Psychological Society. He has conducted research for a variety of public- and private-sector sponsors in a number of applied areas, including occupational analysis, development and validation of measures of individual differences, employee selection and classification systems, and the prediction of human performance in occupational and training settings. LYMAN W. PORTER is professor of management in the Graduate School of Management at the University of California, Irvine, and was formerly dean of that school. Previously he served on the faculty of the University of California, Berkeley. Currently, he serves as a member of the academic advisory board of the Czechoslovak Management Center, a member of the board of trustees of the American University of Armenia, and was formerly an external examiner for the National University of Singapore. He is a past president of the Academy of Management and has received both its Scholarly Contributions to Management Award and its Distinguished Management Educator Award. He has also served as president of the Society of Industrial-Organizational Psychology, and in 1989 received its Distinguished Scientific Contributions Award. His major fields of interest are organizational psychology, management, and management education and has written extensively in these fields. His 1988 book (with Lawrence McKibbin), Management Education and Development, reported the findings of a nationwide study of business school education and post-degree management development. KENNETH I. SPENNER is professor and chair of the Department of Sociology at Duke University. He has a bachelors degree from Creighton University, a masters degree from the University of Notre Dame, and a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. His research interests include work and personality, occupations, career dynamics, technology, and the sociology of organizations and markets. His major current research project is a multiyear panel study of organizational adap-

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tation and survival of a large sample of formerly state-owned manufacturing enterprises in Bulgaria. LTG THEODORE G. STROUP, JR., is the vice president, education and executive director of the Institute of Land Warfare for the Association of the U.S. Army, a nonprofit educational association in Arlington, Virginia. General Stroup served for 34 years in the U.S. Army in multiple worldwide assignments in peace and war. His primary military specialty was as a combat engineer; his last 10 years of service as a flag officer were primarily in strategic resource planning, manpower, and human resources. He was at retirement the U.S. Army deputy chief of staff of personnel. He has a B.S. from the United States Military Academy at West Point, an M.S.E. from Texas A&M, and an M.B.A. from the American University in the fields of economics and finance. He is a licensed professional engineer and has authored articles on military manpower, training, leadership, and military engineering. ROBERT J. VANCE is senior research associate at the Institute for Policy Research and Evaluation at the Pennsylvania State University. He has a B.A. in psychology from the University of Connecticut and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in industrial and organizational psychology from the Pennsylvania State University. Prior to joining Penn State in 1990, he served on the psychology faculty at Ohio State University. His research and teaching interests are in the areas of personnel selection, job performance measurement, work motivation, and organizational development.