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APPENDIX C COMMITTEE AND STAFF BIOGRAPHIES COMMITTEE BIOG - PHIES Richard B. Johnston, Ir., M.D., is professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the National Jewish Medical and Research Center of the University of Colorado School of Medicine. Among his previ- ous appointments is the position of physician-in-chief of the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. He was named a member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and a fellow of the American As- sociation for the Advancement of Science in 1995. Dr. Johnston has served on several ad hoc review and advisory committees for the National Institutes of Health (NIH's) National Institute of Al- lergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) and the Food and Drug Administration, and he is a member of the Advisory Committee of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC's) Na- tional Center for Environmental Health. He has previously chaired three IOM committees. His more than 240 papers, mono- graphs, and book chapters include work on immune diseases in children and the microbiology of respiratory disorders. Dr. Johnston is a past president of the Society for Pediatric Research and the American Pediatric Society. Harriet A. Burge, Ph.D., is associate professor in the Department of Environmental Health Sciences at the Harvard School of Public 418

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APPENDIX C 419 Health. Dr. Burge is a mycologist specializing in indoor air qual- ity. She has served on several National Academy of Sciences' com- mittees, including service as vice-chair of the Committee on the Health Effects of Indoor Allergens, which published the report Indoor Allergens: Assessing and Controlling Adverse Health Effects. Dr. Burge is currently a member of the American Society of Heat- ing, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 62 (Ventilation for Indoor Air Quality) Committee, serves on the Board of Directors of the New England Chapter of the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America, and is a fellow of the American Academy of Allergy and Immunology and the American College of Allergy and Immunology. Previously, she chaired the Bioaerosol Committee of the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists and was vice-chair of the Pan American Aerobiology Association. Dr. Burge has published ex- tensively on fungi and respiratory health, and is author of the forthcoming book Allergy to the Fungi. William I. Fisk, M.S., P.E., is staff scientist and group leader of the Indoor Environment Department in the Environmental Energy Technologies Division at the Lawrence Berkeley National Labora- tory (LBNL). He also serves as group leader for LBNL's Ventila- tion and Indoor Air Quality Control Technologies Group. Mr. Fisk's primary research interests include indoor air pollutant ex- posure, indoor air quality (IAQ) control technologies, and indoor environmental quality and health; he has published and con- sulted extensively in these fields. He is on the Editorial Advisory Committee of Indoor Air: International journal of Indoor Air Quality and Climate and is a member of the steering committee for the IAQ '96, IAQ '98, and IAQ '00 conferences on indoor air quality held by ASHRAE. In 1996, he was awarded the Ralph G. Nevins Award in Physiology and the Human Environment by ASHRAE. Diane R. Gold, M.D., M.P.H., is assistant professor of medicine at the Harvard Medical School and assistant professor in the De- partment of Environmental Health at the Harvard School of Pub- lic Health. She is board certified in internal medicine with sub- specialty board certificates in pulmonary disease and critical care medicine. Dr. Gold's research focuses on the relationships be

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420 CLEARING THE AIR tween environmental exposures and the incidence or severity of respiratory diseases, including asthma. Her work investigates the environmental exposures that may explain the socioeconomic, cultural, and gender differences observed in asthma severity. She is presently principal investigator (PI) of a study on the epidemi- ology of home allergens and asthma sponsored by NIAID and NIEHS. Dr. Gold's professional activities include membership in the American Thoracic Society. She is on the Advisory Committee of the NIEHS Center for Environmental Health in Northern Man- hattan. In 1992 she was a corecipient of the Premio Matilde M. de Santos en Salud Ambiental de la Fundacion Mexicana pare la Salud. Leon Gordis, M.D., Dr.P.H., is professor in the Department of Epi- demiology in the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health and in the Department of Pediatrics at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, where he also is director of the Clinical Epi- demiology Program and associate dean for Admissions and Aca- demic Affairs. He was named a member of the Institute of Medi- cine in 1986 and is chair of the IOM's Public Health, Biostatistics, and Epidemiology Membership Committee. Dr. Gordis is a mem- ber of the Board of Scientific Counselors of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. He authored the book Epidemiology of Chronic Lung Diseases in Children and edited Epide- miology and Health Risk Assessment, among numerous writing cred- its. Dr. Gordis' professional associations include service as presi- dent of the Society for Epidemiologic Research and the American Epidemiological Society. Michael M. Grunstein, M.D., Ph.D., is professor of pediatrics and chief of the Division of Pulmonary Medicine at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, a part of the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. He is board certified in pediatrics and has a subspecialty board certificate in pediatric pulmonology. Dr. Grunstein's research interests are focused on the mechanisms un- derlying asthma's various inflammation-associated effects on the airways and he is PI on two RO1 grants related to this work. He is presently a member of the NIH Study Section on Lung Biology

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APPENDIX C 421 and Pathology and previously served as an ad hoc reviewer for the Study Section on Respiratory and Applied Physiology. Dr. Grunstein is associate editor of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine and editorial board councilor for Pediat- ric Pulmonology. Patrick L. Kinney, Sc.D., is assistant professor in the Division of Environmental Health Sciences at Columbia School of Public Health. Dr. Kinney is PI of a study characterizing personal expo- sures among high school students living in New York City and Los Angeles to a range of toxic substances present in urban air, and investigating the relative contributions of indoor and out- door sources to these exposures. He is also conducting a study that addresses the role of indoor allergen exposures in asthma among children living in northern Manhattan and the south Bronx. Dr. Kinney is a peer reviewer for the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Environmental Health Perspec- tives, and the Journal of Exposure Analysis and Environmental Epide- miology among other professional publications. Herman E. Mitchell, Ph.D., is senior research scientist for the con- sulting firm Rho Federal Systems Division and adjunct professor of biostatistics in the University of South Carolina School of Pub- lic Health. He previously served as director of the Pennsylvania State Health Data Center and assistant dean of the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health, where he also held appointments in the Departments of Epidemiology and Biostatis- tics. Dr. Mitchell is the coordinating center PI for the NIAID-spon- sored National Cooperative Inner City Asthma Study (NCICAS), a multicenter investigation of the increased morbidity and mor- tality associated with asthma among children living in inner cit- ies. His research focus is on the empirical analysis of the NCICAS data set. He will also be coordinating center PI for the follow-up Inner City Asthma Study, an interventions study. Dr. Mitchell's professional associations include the Society for Clinical Trials and the American Association for Advancements in Health Care Research.

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422 CLEARING THE AIR Dennis R. Ownby, M.D., is professor of pediatrics at the Medical College of Georgia. He is board-certified in pediatrics and in al- lergy and immunology. Dr. Ownby's work includes investigations of environmental factors as determinants of childhood asthma and ethnic differences in childhood asthma. In addition to his aca- demic and research responsibilities, he is director of the Ameri- can Board of Allergy and Immunology. Dr. Ownby is a fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology. He serves as an ad hoc re- viewer for several professional publications including the Ameri- can Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine and the Interna- tional Archives of Allergy and Immunology. Thomas A. E. Platts-Mills, M.D., Ph.D., is professor of medicine and microbiology and chief of the Division of Allergy, Asthma, and Clinical Immunology at the University of Virginia Health Sci- ences Center. Dr. Platts-Milis' clinical and research interests con- cern the role of indoor allergens in asthma, rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis. His laboratory studies are directed to understanding the role that immune responses to foreign proteins play in these diseases. This research includes detailed studies of the houses of patients to identify the form in which allergens become airborne and to develop detailed strategies for the control of exposure. Dr. Platts-MilIs is a fellow of the American Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. He is a member of the Editorial Boards of the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Clinical and Experi- mental Allergy, and the Journal of Immunological Methods. Sampson B. Sarpong, M.B., Ch.B., is assistant professor in the Department of Pediatrics and the Committee on Immunology at the University of Chicago. He is also director of the university's pediatric allergy laboratory, where his research interests focus on the role of indoor allergens in childhood asthma. His research on the role of cockroach allergen in childhood asthma is supported by NIAID. He is a member of several organizations including the American Thoracic Society; American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology: New York Academy of Sciences; and American Association for the Advancement of Science.

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APPENDIX C 423 Sandra R. Wilson, Ph.D., is senior staff scientist and chair of the Department of Health Services Research of the Palo Alto Medical Foundation Research Institute. She is also Clinical Professor of Medicine and of Health Research and Policy at the Stanford Uni- versity School of Medicine. Dr. Wilson's research centers on inter- vention strategies in the treatment and control of asthma, includ- ing investigations of the efficacy of an environmental tobacco smoke exposure intervention and other educational interventions. She chaired the American Lung Association Working Group on Standards for Asthma Education and formerly served as a mem- ber of the Board of Directors of the American Thoracic Society. She serves as an ad hoc reviewer for the American Journal of Respi- ratory and Critical Care Medicine, the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, the Journal of the American Medical Association, Chest, and others. STAFF BIOGRAPHIES Rose Marie Martinez, Sc.D., is the director of the Institute of Medicine's (IOM's) Division on Health Promotion and Disease Prevention. Prior to coming to the IOM, she was a senior health researcher at Mathematica Policy Research where she focused on health workforce issues, access to care for vulnerable populations, managed care, and public health issues. Dr. Martinez is a former assistant director for Health Financing and Policy with the U.S. General Accounting Office where she led evaluations and policy analysis in the area of national and public health issues. Kathleen Stratton, Ph.D., was the director of the Division of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention of the Institute of Medi- cine through November 1999. She received a bachelor of arts de- gree in natural sciences from Johns Hopkins University and a Ph.D. from the University of Maryland at Baltimore. After com- pleting a postdoctoral fellowship in the neuropharmacology of phencyclidine compounds at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and the neurophysiology of second-messenger sys- tems at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, she joined the staff of the Institute of Medicine in 1990. Dr. Stratton has worked on projects in environmental risk assessment,

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424 CLEARING THE AIR neurotoxicology, the organization of research and services in the Public Health Service, vaccine safety, fetal alcohol syndrome, and vaccine development. She has had primary responsibility for the reports Adverse Events Associated with Childhood Vaccines: Evidence Bearing on Causality, DPT Vaccine and Chronic Nervous System Dys- function; Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: Diagnosis, Epidemiology, Preven- tion, and Treatment; and Vaccines for the 21st Century: An Analytic Toolfor Prioritization. David A. Butler, Ph.D., is a senior project officer in the Division of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention of the Institute of Medicine. He received B.S. and M.S. degrees in engineering from the University of Rochester, and a Ph.D. in public policy analysis from Carnegie-Mellon University. Prior to joining the IOM, Dr. Butler served as an analyst for the U.S. Congress Office of Tech- nology Assessment and was research associate in the Department of Environmental Health at the Harvard School of Public Health. He is on the Editorial Advisory Board of the journal Risk: Health, Safety ~ Environment. His research interests include exposure as- sessment and risk analysis. lames A. Bowers, is a research assistant in the Division of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention of the Institute of Medicine. He received his undergraduate degree in environmental studies from Binghamton University. He has also been involved with the IOM committees that produced Veterans and Agent Orange: Update 1998, Characterizing Exposure of Veterans to Agent Orange and Other Herbicides Used in Vietnam, and Adequacy of the Comprehensive Clini- cal Evaluation Program: Nerve Agents. Jennifer A. Cohen, is a research assistant in the Division of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention of the Institute of Medicine. She received her undergraduate degree in art history from the University of Maryland. She has also been involved with the IOM committee that produced Organ Procurement and Transplantation.