Appendices



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--> Appendices

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--> Appendix A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Robert A. Dalrymple (chair) is the Edward C. Davis Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Delaware, where he has been on the faculty since 1973. He also has served as assistant dean of the College of Engineering and acting department chair. Dr. Dalrymple's research has focused on wave mechanics, including wave-propagation modeling and wave-current interaction, littoral processes, and tidal inlets. His publications include many peer-reviewed articles and several books, including Water Wave Mechanics for Engineers and Scientists (with R.G. Dean) and Physical Modeling in Coastal Engineering and Coastal Hydrodynamics (editor). He currently serves on editorial boards of Coastal Engineering and the Journal of Hydraulic Research. A registered professional engineer in Delaware, Dr. Dalrymple is a fellow of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) and a member of the American Geophysical Union and the American Shore and Beach Preservation Society. He is a member of the ASCE Coastal Engineering Research Council and the Advisory Committee of COPEDEC (Coastal and Port Engineering in Developing Countries). He received the 1996 John G. Moffatt-Frank E. Nichol Harbor and Coastal Engineering Award from the ASCE and the 1999 Coastal Engineering Award from the American Society of Civil Engineers. He was a member of the Marine Board's Committee on Engineering Implications of Changes in Sea Level. He has an A.B. in engineering science from Dartmouth College, an M.S. in ocean engineering from the University of Hawaii, and a Ph.D. in civil and coastal engineering from the University of Florida. Dr. Dalrymple received the 1999 International Coastal Engineering Award from the American Society of Civil Engineers.

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--> Richard A. Davis is Distinguished Research Professor in the Department of Geology and former director of the Environmental Science and Policy Program at the University of South Florida. Dr. Davis has specialized in coastal and marine geology (especially beaches, inlets, and barrier-island systems); sedimentology of tide-dominated environments; coastal management, with an emphasis on beaches and inlets; environmental geology; and modern and ancient depositional systems. His research has focused on process and response systems at work along beaches, inlets, and barrier islands and the Holocene history of these coastal systems. He is currently conducting research on the history and development of the barrier-island system of Florida's gulf coast, along with multiple beach-monitoring projects. He is the author or editor of 14 textbooks and monographs. Dr. Davis received a B.S. from Beloit College, an M.A. from the University of Texas, and a Ph.D. from the University of Illinois, all in geology. He is a former Fulbright Scholar and a member of Sigma Gamma Epsilon. Robert G. Dean, NAE, is graduate research professor of coastal and ocean engineering at the University of Florida, a position he has held since 1982. Previously, he held faculty positions at the University of Delaware, the University of Washington, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He also has served as a consultant on coastal and ocean engineering to private industry and government clients. He is a past member of the Marine Board and chaired the Committee on Engineering Implications of Sea Level Rise. Dr. Dean is an expert in wave mechanics and coastal engineering problems, and he has published many papers on wave theory, beach erosion, tidal inlets, and coastal structures. He is a past recipient of the John G. Moffatt-Frank E. Nichol Harbor and Coastal Engineering Award and International Coastal Engineering Award, both administered by the ASCE. Dr. Dean has a B.S. in civil engineering from the University of California (UC), Berkeley, an M.S. in physical oceanography from the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas, and a Sc.D. in civil engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Billy L. Edge is the W.H. Bauer Professor of Dredging Engineering at Texas A&M University. An internationally recognized expert in coastal engineering and dredging technology, Dr. Edge has had a distinguished career as a senior researcher in the physical sciences with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), a member of the faculty at Clemson University and Texas A&M, and a consultant with Dames and Moore, Cubit Engineering, and Edge & Associates. He has served as secretary of the Coastal Engineering Research Council of the ASCE, editor of the ASCE's Proceedings of the International Conferences on Coastal Engineering, and chair of the biennial international coastal zone conferences. He is a recipient of the American Shore and Beach Preservation Association's Morrough P. O'Brien Award and the ASCE's International Coastal Engineering Award. A registered professional engineer in South Carolina, Florida, and

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--> Virginia, Dr. Edge has B.S. and M.S. degrees from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and a Ph.D. from the Georgia Institute of Technology, all in civil engineering. Karyn E. Erickson is vice president of Applied Technology & Management, Inc., of Gainesville, Florida, where she has served as a project director for coastal engineering projects and services, including the design and engineering of coastal structures and beach-nourishment programs, emergency beach and dune protection and recovery, inlet management planning and implementation, and financing. She has managed numerous highly visible recreational beach-restoration projects in Florida, South Carolina, North Carolina, and the Caribbean, and has published and presented many related papers. Ms. Erickson is a registered professional civil engineer in Florida, South Carolina, and North Carolina and a member of the ASCE and the Florida Shore and Beaches Preservation Association. She has an M.E. degree from the University of Florida. John S. Fisher is director of the Center for Transportation and the Environment at North Carolina State University, where he is also a professor. Previously, he held teaching and research positions at the University of Virginia and Clemson University and positions in private industry. Dr. Fisher's research has focused on coastal engineering and shoreline processes, such as beach erosion and nourishment, storm effects, structures, shoreline changes over time, and barrier-island dynamics. He has conducted research for the National Park Service, U.S. Army Research Office, USACE, National Sea Grant College Program, National Science Foundation, North Carolina Department of Transportation, and Federal Emergency Management Agency and has published numerous journal articles and technical reports. Among other professional activities, he served on the Publications Committee of the Journal of the Waterway, Port, Coastal, and Ocean Division, ASCE and on the Board of Directors of the American Shore and Beach Preservation Association. He has a Ph.D. in civil engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Gary B. Griggs is director of the Institute of Marine Sciences at UC, Santa Cruz, where he is also a professor of Earth sciences. His research has included coastal hazards, such as shoreline erosion, littoral sand budgets (including sources, transport, storage, and sinks), and the effectiveness and impacts of coastal engineering structures. A former Fulbright fellow and National Science Foundation graduate fellow in oceanography, Dr. Griggs is a fellow of the Geological Society of America and a member of the American Geophysical Union. He serves on the editorial boards of the Journal of Coastal Research and Geology and on the Board of Directors of the American Shore and Beach Preservation Association. He has a B.A. in geology from UC, Santa Barbara, a Ph.D. in oceanography from Oregon State University, and is a registered geologist and certified engineering geologist in California. He has published many journal articles and technical

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--> reports and has written four books, including Living with the California Coast, California's Coastal Hazards: A Critical Look at Existing Policies and Practices. Orville T. Magoon, president of the Coastal Zone Foundation, has experience in coastal planning; coastal-zone management; and the design, construction, and rehabilitation of coastal structures. Mr. Magoon conceived and chaired major conferences on coastal-zone management and coastal processes, an achievement for which he received the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Benchmark Award in 1983. He was the organizer and co-chair of California and the World Oceans '97, a conference on California's new long-range planning document covering coastal protection, development, and management. Mr. Magoon is the author of numerous technical publications on coastal engineering and has received many awards for his activism in the field. He is a member of the Advisory Council of the California Academy of Sciences. Mr. Magoon has a B.S. from the University of Hawaii and an M.S. from Stanford University, both in civil engineering. Marvin K. Moss is provost and vice chancellor for academic affairs at the University of North Carolina at Wilmington, a position he has held since 1992. His career has included positions as associate vice chancellor for marine sciences at UC, San Diego, deputy director of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, director and technical director of the Office of Naval Research, and associate director for energy research at the U.S. Department of Energy. His research interests include ocean physics, global warming, and environmental issues, and he is the author of numerous science and policy publications. He is a member and former chair of the federal interagency Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program and a member of the Board of Governors for the Consortium of Oceanographic Research and Education. He also has served on numerous professional review panels and study groups. Dr. Moss has a Ph.D. in physics from North Carolina State University. Robert D. Nichol has been president of Moffatt & Nichol Engineers of Long Beach, California, since 1975. He is in charge of projects and operations for the company, which has provided consulting services for the U.S. Navy, USACE, U.S. Air Force, U.S. Maritime Administration, and U.S. Department of State, as well as many other government, foreign, and private-sector clients. Mr. Nichol contributes his engineering and management expertise to waterfront, industrial, commercial, military, and public works projects, such as harbor channel deepening for the Port of Los Angeles, infrastructure development and lakeshore land reclamation, and coastal erosion control in Malaysia. A registered civil engineer in 10 states, Mr. Nichol is a member of the ASCE, National Society of Professional Engineers, Chi Epsilon, National Honor Civil Engineering Fraternity, and the Board of Directors of the California Marine Affairs and Navigation

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--> Conference. He has a B.S. degree in civil engineering from the University of Minnesota. Anthony P. Pratt is environmental program manager for the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control in the Division of Soil and Water Conservation. He oversees numerous programs related to beach construction, dune building and maintenance, and the National Flood Insurance Community Assistance Program. His career in public service has included managing the Delaware Coastal Management Program, which oversees coastal projects involving wetlands, beaches, reducing storm hazards, land use, and public access. Mr. Pratt is a member of the Board of Directors of the American Coastal Coalition and the American Shore and Beach Preservation Association. He chaired the Ad Hoc Committee on Beach Management/Sea Level Rise for Delaware's Environmental Legacy and was lead staff member for the Beaches 2000 Planning Group. He has a B.S. degree from Hampshire College. Fredric Raichlen, NAE, is professor of civil engineering at the California Institute of Technology. His experience encompasses fundamental and applied research, teaching, and consulting in coastal engineering. He is an expert in the wave defense of structures, surges and oscillations in harbors, and the dynamics of tsunamis. He served on the USACE Coastal Engineering Research Board and helped integrate USACE's physical modeling with numerical calculations and field observations. Dr. Raichlen is a fellow of the ASCE and the recipient of the ASCE 1994 John G. Moffatt-Frank E. Nichol Harbor and Coastal Engineering Award. He is also a member of the International Association for Hydraulic Research, Permanent International Association of Navigation Congresses, Sigma Xi, and numerous industry advisory committees. He has a B.E. from Johns Hopkins University and S.M. and Sc.D. degrees from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Richard J. Seymour is director emeritus of the Offshore Technology Research Center and emeritus professor of civil engineering at Texas A&M University, where he also held the Wofford Cain Chair in Ocean Engineering. Currently, he is head of the Ocean Engineering Research Group at Scripps Institution of Oceanography. An ocean and coastal engineer, Dr. Seymour has had a broad range of experience in industry, state government, and academic research. His research specialty is ocean wave spectra and the application of knowledge of waves and related ocean conditions to the design and operation of structures in, on, under, and adjacent to the sea. Dr. Seymour was a member of the Marine Board from 1984 through 1990 and board chair from 1994 through 1996. He chaired the Committee on Information for Port and Harbor Operations and the Committee on Beach Nourishment. Dr. Seymour has a B.S. in engineering from the U.S. Naval Academy and a Ph.D. in oceanography from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC, San Diego.