C Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

COMMITTEE MEMBERS

C. HERB WARD, who chaired the committee, is the Foyt family chair of engineering at Rice University, where he is also professor of environmental science and engineering and ecology and evolutionary biology. He directs the Energy and Environmental Systems Institute, the Department of Defense Advanced Applied Technology Demonstration Facility, and the National Center for Ground Water Research. In addition, he serves as codirector of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-sponsored Hazardous Substances Research Center/South and Southwest. His research interests include the microbial ecology of hazardous waste sites, biodegradation by natural microbial populations, microbial processes for aquifer restoration, and microbial transport and fate. He also chairs the National Research Council's Committee on Peer Review in the Department of Energy—Office of Science and Technology. He received his Ph.D. in plant pathology, genetics, and physiology from Cornell University and an M.P.H. in environmental health from the University of Texas.

HERBERT E. ALLEN is a professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and a professor of oceanography in the Graduate College of Marine Studies at the University of Delaware. His research interests include environmental chemistry, fate and effects of pollutants in water, sediment and soil environments, development of environmental standards, analytical chemistry, and the hazardous



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Ground Water & Soil Cleanup: Improving Management of Persistent Contaminants C Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff COMMITTEE MEMBERS C. HERB WARD, who chaired the committee, is the Foyt family chair of engineering at Rice University, where he is also professor of environmental science and engineering and ecology and evolutionary biology. He directs the Energy and Environmental Systems Institute, the Department of Defense Advanced Applied Technology Demonstration Facility, and the National Center for Ground Water Research. In addition, he serves as codirector of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-sponsored Hazardous Substances Research Center/South and Southwest. His research interests include the microbial ecology of hazardous waste sites, biodegradation by natural microbial populations, microbial processes for aquifer restoration, and microbial transport and fate. He also chairs the National Research Council's Committee on Peer Review in the Department of Energy—Office of Science and Technology. He received his Ph.D. in plant pathology, genetics, and physiology from Cornell University and an M.P.H. in environmental health from the University of Texas. HERBERT E. ALLEN is a professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and a professor of oceanography in the Graduate College of Marine Studies at the University of Delaware. His research interests include environmental chemistry, fate and effects of pollutants in water, sediment and soil environments, development of environmental standards, analytical chemistry, and the hazardous

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Ground Water & Soil Cleanup: Improving Management of Persistent Contaminants treatment of explosives and metals. He is a visiting professor in the Department of Environmental Science at Nankai University in the People's Republic of China and had a World Health Organization fellowship to study environmental chemistry in The Netherlands and Germany. He received a B.S. in chemistry from the University of Michigan in 1962, an M.S. in analytical chemistry from Wayne State University in 1967, and a Ph.D. in environmental chemistry from the University of Michigan in 1974. RICHARD E. BELSEY is an emeritus professor of pathology at the Oregon Health Sciences University. His medical training is in internal medicine and endocrinology, and his research interests focus on the health and safety issues associated with activities at the Hanford Site. He is a member of the Portland Chapter of Physicians for Social Responsibility and a member of its National Task Force on Nuclear Weapons and Public Health. He has been a Hanford Advisory Board member since 1994 and chair of its Health, Safety and Waste Management Committee. He has served on the State of Oregon Hanford Waste Board since 1990 and is chair of its Waste Cleanup and Site Restoration Committee. He received his M.D. from the Albany Medical College in 1966. KIRK W. BROWN is a professor of soil science at Texas A&M University and is also a member of the faculty of toxicology. He is a consultant with K. W. Brown Environmental Services, which he founded in 1981. His research focuses on the land disposal of wastes and the cleanup of sites contaminated with agricultural and industrial chemicals. He has served on several EPA, Office of Technology Assessment, and National Research Council committees and has received numerous awards from Texas A&M and from professional societies. He received his B.S. from Delaware Valley College, his M.S. from Cornell University, and his Ph.D. from the University of Nebraska. RANDALL J. CHARBENEAU is a professor in the Department of Civil Engineering at the University of Texas and director of the Center for Research on Water Resources. His expertise is in groundwater pollution, fate and transport, and modeling, and his research interests include groundwater hydraulics and contaminant transport, numerical modeling, and radiological assessment. He has served on numerous panels, including review of an incineration risk assessment at the Savannah River Site, a review of performance evaluation of mixed low-level waste disposal sites, and a project review of in situ redox manipulation. He received a B.S. from the University of Michigan in

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Ground Water & Soil Cleanup: Improving Management of Persistent Contaminants 1973, an M.S. from Oregon State University in 1975, and a Ph.D. from Stanford University in 1978, all in civil engineering. RICHARD A. CONWAY is an environmental consultant and retired senior corporate fellow at Union Carbide Corporation. His areas of expertise include contaminated site remediation, hazardous waste management, and environmental risk analysis of chemical products. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1986 for his contributions to environmental engineering and for the development of improved treatment processes for industrial wastes. He has received many awards and honors, including the Hering Medal, Gascoigne Medal, Dudley Medal, Rudolfs Medal, and honors from the American Society of Civil Engineers, the Water Environment Federation, and the American Society for Testing and Materials. He has been involved in numerous NRC activities, including the Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology, the Water Science and Technology Board, and the Committee on Peer Review in the Department of Energy—Office of Science and Technology. He received his M.S. in environmental engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. HELEN E. DAWSON is an assistant professor in the Department of Environmental Science and Engineering at the Colorado School of Mines. Her research interests include transport and fate of organic and inorganic contaminants, solute transport in saturated and unsaturated sediments, and transport and remediation of petroleum hydrocarbons and chlorinated solvents as free phases in subsurface systems. She received a B.S. in geology from Stanford University in 1987, an M.S. in geochemistry from the Colorado School of Mines, and a Ph.D. in environmental engineering from Stanford University. JOHN C. FOUNTAIN is a professor of geochemistry at the State University of New York at Buffalo. His research focuses on various aspects of contaminant hydrology, including aquifer remediation and the characterization of fractured rock aquifers. He is also a member of the NRC's Committee on Peer Review in the Department of Energy—Office of Science and Technology. He received his B.S. from California Polytech State University, San Luis Obispo, in 1970, his M.A. in 1973, and his Ph.D. in geology in 1975, both from the University of California at Santa Barbara. RICHARD L. JOHNSON is an associate professor in the Department of Environmental Science and Engineering at the Oregon Graduate Institute and directs the Center for Groundwater Research. He researches

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Ground Water & Soil Cleanup: Improving Management of Persistent Contaminants the processes that control the movement of subsurface contaminants in the environment. He received a B.S. in chemistry from the University of Seattle in 1973, an M.S. in 1981 and a Ph.D. in 1984, both in environmental science from the Oregon Graduate Center. ROBERT D. NORRIS is the technical director of bioremediation services at Eckenfelder, Brown and Caldwell in Nashville, Tennessee. He has managed numerous remediation projects and served as a technical expert on many projects for both EPA-and state-mandated remedial actions, feasibility studies, and treatability studies for a wide range of in situ and ex situ remediation technologies. Currently, he is managing the implementation of a zero-valence metal-permeable barrier at a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act site for treatment of chlorinated volatile organic compounds and chromium, and evaluation of this technology at a Department of Energy site for treatment of trichloroethylene, uranium, and technetium. He holds 13 patents, 4 on various aspects of bioremediation. He received a B.S. in chemistry from Beloit College in 1966 and a Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of Notre Dame in 1971. FREDERICK G. POHLAND is professor and Edward R. Weidlein chair of environmental engineering at the University of Pittsburgh. His research has focused on environmental engineering operations and processes, solid and hazardous waste management, and environmental impact monitoring and assessment. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1993 for advancing the theory of anaerobic treatment processes and applications to solid waste management. He has been a visiting scholar at the University of Michigan and a guest professor at the Delft University of Technology in The Netherlands. He received his B.S. in civil engineering from Valparaiso University and his M.S. and Ph.D. in environmental engineering from Purdue University. KARL K. TUREKIAN is Benjamin Silliman professor in the Department of Geology and Geophysics at Yale University and has directed the Center for the Study of Global Change. His expertise is in the geochemistry of radionuclides and trace elements and marine geochemistry. He was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1984. He has participated in many NRC activities, including the Commission on Geosciences, Environment, and Resources; the Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Resources; the U.S. Committee for Geochemistry; and the Ocean Studies Board. He received his A.B. from Wheaton College in 1949, his M.A. in 1951, and his Ph.D. in 1955, both from Columbia University.

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Ground Water & Soil Cleanup: Improving Management of Persistent Contaminants JOHN C. WESTALL is a professor in the Department of Chemistry at Oregon State University and an adjunct professor in the Department of Science and Engineering at the Oregon Graduate Institute. His research focuses on the application of surface and solution chemistry to problems in environmental chemistry, electrochemistry, and analytical chemistry, particularly the complex interactions of metals with organic materials and soil and the development of models for these interactions. He received a B.S. in chemistry from the University of North Carolina in 1971 and a Ph.D. in chemistry from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1977. STAFF JACQUELINE A. MACDONALD is associate director of the National Research Council's Water Science and Technology Board. She directed the studies that led to the reports Innovations in Ground Water and Soil Cleanup: From Concept to Commercialization, Alternatives for Ground Water Cleanup, In Situ Bioremediation: When Does It Work?, Safe Water from Every Tap: Improving Water Service to Small Communities, and Fresh-water Ecosystems: Revitalizing Educational Programs in Limnology. She received the 1996 National Research Council Award for Distinguished Service. Ms. MacDonald earned an M.S. degree in environmental science in civil engineering from the University of Illinois, where she received a university graduate fellowship and Avery Brundage scholarship, and a B.A. degree magna cum laude in mathematics from Bryn Mawr College. She has written about environmental remediation technologies for a number of publications, including Environmental Science and Technology, Water Environment and Technology, and Soil and Groundwater Cleanup.