Cover Image

PAPERBACK
$111.75



View/Hide Left Panel

TABLE 4-4 Energy and Protein Intake, Female Soldiers

Study

N

Ration Type

Energy (kcal)

Protein (g)

% Energy

Ft. Lewis, 1987 (G)*, (Szeto et al., 1987)

12

A

1,832

75

16.4

Ft. Jackson, 1988 (G), (R.W. Rose et al., 1989)

40

A

2,467

96

15.6

Ft. Hood, 1988 (F), (M.S. Rose et al., 1989)

27

2B + 1MRE

2,343

82

14.0

Bolivia, 1990 (F), (Edwards et al., 1991)

13

2B + 1MRE

1,668

68

16.3

Ft. Jackson, 1993 (G), (King et al., 1994)

49

A

2,592

82

12.7

Ft. Sam Houston, 1995 (G), (Cline et al., 1998)

56

A

2,037

75

14.7

Camp Parks, 1996 (F), (Hirsch et al., in press)

19

MRE

2,161

82

15.2

Average G

 

 

2,232

82

14.9

Average F

 

 

2,057

77

15.0

NOTE: MRE, Meal Ready-to-Eat.

* G = Garrison study.

† These soldiers in basic training course.

‡ F = Field study.

Nutrition Survey I (Warber et al., 1996) at 33 Army installations worldwide, over one-fourth (26%) of male respondents and nearly one-third (31%) of female respondents replied that they used field feeding as a way to lose weight.

Energy and Protein Intakes of Military Men

Infantry soldiers from Fort Shafter, Hawaii, participated in a study at Pohakuloa Training Area, Hawaii (2,160 m), to determine the adequacy of the Meal, Ready-to-Eat (MRE) during strenuous cross-country running under high-altitude field conditions (Askew et al., 1986). During the 10-d exercise, soldiers consumed less than 67 percent of calories recommended for energy balance and lost 3 percent of their body weight, 10 percent of their body fat, and experienced a 5 percent decline in maximal aerobic capacity. Protein intake was 99 percent of recommended intake. By comparison, infantry soldiers training in Alaska



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement