D Committee and Staff Biographies

Committee Biographies

DAVID E. LONGNECKER, M.D., is the Robert Dunning Dripps Professor and Chair of the University of Pennsylvania Department of Anesthesia. Dr. Longnecker received his M.D. degree in 1964 from Indiana University School of Medicine, where he completed residency training in anesthesiology in 1967. Following a National Institutes of Health (NIH) Special Research Fellowship in Physiology, he continued clinical and laboratory research at the NIH Clinical Center, where he served as a Clinical Associate from 1968 to 1970. He has received numerous NIH research grants and a Research Career Development Award for research involving the effects of anesthetics on the microcirculation, oxygen delivery to tissue, oxygen therapeutics, endothelium-dependent circulatory control, and health services research. Dr. Longnecker is the author and coauthor of over 175 scientific abstracts and original scientific articles, 29 chapters, and five textbooks. Dr. Longnecker was the Harold Carron Professor of Anesthesiology at the University of Virginia, where he served from 1974 to 1988, and an Assistant Professor of Anesthesiology and Physiology at the University of Missouri from 1970 to 1973. Dr. Longnecker is a member of the Institute of Medicine.

WILLIAM G. BAXT, M.D., is the Chief of Emergency Medicine Services at the University of Pennsylvania Medical Center. Dr. Baxt received his B.A. at Brown University before later earning his M.D. at Yale University. Dr. Baxt specializes in emergency medicine, prehospital care, and informatics. Specifically, his research involves nonlinear statistics using the artificial neural network as a paradigm for decision analysis and clinical diagnosis. Dr. Baxt is also Professor and Chair of the Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania Medical Center. Dr. Baxt is a member of the Institute of Medicine.



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D Committee and Staff Biographies Committee Biographies DAVID E. LONGNECKER, M.D., is the Robert Dunning Dripps Professor and Chair of the University of Pennsylvania Department of Anesthesia. Dr. Longnecker received his M.D. degree in 1964 from Indiana University School of Medicine, where he completed residency training in anesthesiology in 1967. Following a National Institutes of Health (NIH) Special Research Fellowship in Physiology, he continued clinical and laboratory research at the NIH Clinical Center, where he served as a Clinical Associate from 1968 to 1970. He has received numerous NIH research grants and a Research Career Development Award for research involving the effects of anesthetics on the microcirculation, oxygen delivery to tissue, oxygen therapeutics, endothelium-dependent circulatory control, and health services research. Dr. Longnecker is the author and coauthor of over 175 scientific abstracts and original scientific articles, 29 chapters, and five textbooks. Dr. Longnecker was the Harold Carron Professor of Anesthesiology at the University of Virginia, where he served from 1974 to 1988, and an Assistant Professor of Anesthesiology and Physiology at the University of Missouri from 1970 to 1973. Dr. Longnecker is a member of the Institute of Medicine. WILLIAM G. BAXT, M.D., is the Chief of Emergency Medicine Services at the University of Pennsylvania Medical Center. Dr. Baxt received his B.A. at Brown University before later earning his M.D. at Yale University. Dr. Baxt specializes in emergency medicine, prehospital care, and informatics. Specifically, his research involves nonlinear statistics using the artificial neural network as a paradigm for decision analysis and clinical diagnosis. Dr. Baxt is also Professor and Chair of the Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania Medical Center. Dr. Baxt is a member of the Institute of Medicine.

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JOSEPH C. FRATANTONI, M.D., is the Vice President of Biologics at C. L. McIntosh and Associates, Inc., which provides consulting services to companies that manufacture biologic products, including blood products, diagnostics, vaccines, and therapeutics. Dr. Fratantoni earned his M.D. degree from Cornell University Medical College, an M.A. degree in chemistry from Harvard University, and a B.S. degree in chemistry from Fordham College. Dr. Fratantoni's areas of expertise include regulatory, quality, and product development. Dr. Fratantoni was the Director of the Division of Hematology at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) Office of Blood Research and Review. In addition to his participation in many FDA policy committees, Dr. Fratantoni has served on the Scientific Program Committee of the American Association of Blood Banks, the Biomedical Excellence for Safe Transfusion Working Party of the International Society of Blood Transfusion, the Naval Research Advisory Committee's Special Panel on Blood Substitutes, and the Institute of Medicine Forum on Blood Safety and Availability. JURETA W. HORTON, Ph.D., is Director of the Surgical CORE Research Facility and a professor in the Department of Surgery at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, Texas. She is also a full member of the graduate faculty in Biomedical Engineering and serves as CoDirector of the STARS program for Dallas County Teachers. Dr. Horton received her B.A. from Our Lady of the Lake in San Antonio, Texas, and her Ph.D. from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas. Dr. Horton is on the Editorial Board of SHOCK. Molecular, Cellular, and Systemic Pathobiological Aspects and Therapeutic Approaches as well as on the Editorial Board of Current Science. She is also a member of the American Burn Association, the American Heart Association, the American Heart Council on Circulation, the Shock Society, the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma, the American Physiology Society, and the Society of Critical Care. Dr. Horton is a reviewer for the Journal of Surgical Research, for the American Journal of Physiology, and for Critical Care Medicine. Dr. Horton has served as a member of the Special Emphasis National Institutes of Health (NIH) Study Section and as an NIH site visitor to evaluate training and research programs. JOHN P. KAMPINE, M.D., Ph.D., is Professor and Chair of the Department of Anesthesiology at the Medical College of Wisconsin. He is also a Staff Anesthesiologist at Zablocki Veterans Administration Hospital and Froedtert Memorial Hospital and the Director of Anesthesiology and Operating Room Services at Milwaukee County Medical Complex. Dr. Kampine received his M.D. and Ph.D. from Marquette University with a focus on physiology. He is Past President of the Association of University Anesthesiologists and Past President of the Society of Academic Anesthesia Chairmen. He has been a member of the Surgery, Anesthesia and Trauma study section and ad hoc member of the Experimental Cardiovascular Sciences Section of National Institutes of Health. The author or coauthor of more than 600 original papers and published abstracts, Dr. Kampine's research

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interests are in cardiovascular regulation during anesthesia. Dr. Kampine is a member of the Institute of Medicine. HARVEY G. KLEIN, M.D., is currently the Chief of the Department of Transfusion Medicine at the Warren G. Magnuson Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health. Dr. Klein received his A.B. degree from Harvard College and his Doctor of Medicine from the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. He is board certified in internal medicine, in hematology, and in blood banking and immunohematology. Dr. Klein has authored or coauthored more than 150 publications pertaining to blood transfusion, including transfusion-transmitted disease, the management of immunosuppressive effects of blood transfusion, and the impact of biotechnology on transfusion medicine. Dr. Klein is Editor-in-Chief emeritus of the Journal of Clinical Apheresis, has served on the Editorial Board of Blood, and is currently an editor of Transfusion and Transfusion Medicine Reviews. Dr. Klein has been a member of the Institute of Medicine Forum on Blood Safety, Chairman of the Standards Committee of the American Association of Blood Banks, Chairman of the Blood and Blood Products Committee of the U.S. Pharmacopoeia, and Chairman of the Transfusion Medicine Subcommittee of the American Society of Hematology. He was formerly Council President of the National Marrow Donor Program. JOSEPH E. RALL, M.D., is a Senior Scientist at the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases of the National Institutes of Health. He received his B.A. from North Central College and his M.A. from Northwestern University. Dr. Rall received his M.D. from Northwestern University Medical School and his Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota. His research has involved endocrine research on the thyroid and more recently isolation and cloning of the steroid/thyroid nuclear hormone receptors. Recent publications are in Development and the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Dr. Rall is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and has served as a member on a number of committees. GEORGE F. SHELDON, M.D., is the Zack D. Owens Distinguished Professor of Surgery and chairman of the Department of Surgery at the North Carolina School of Medicine. Dr. Sheldon received his A.B. degree and his M.D. degree at Kansas University in 1957 and 1961, respectively. He was a Fellow in Internal Medicine at the Mayo Clinic prior to doing his surgical residency at the University of California, San Francisco, from 1964 to 1969. He completed 2 years of research fellowship at Harvard Medical School in 1971. Dr. Sheldon has been Chairman of the American Board of Surgery, a Regent of the American College of Surgeons, President of the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma, Secretary and President of the American Surgical Association, and is currently President of the Society of Surgical Chairman and President of the American College of Surgeons. He has been named an Honorary Member of the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh, the Association of Surgeons of Great Britain and Ireland, and the

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European Surgical Association and is Chair of the Council of Academic Societies of the Association of American Medical Colleges. In 1993 he received the National Safety Council's Surgeon's Award for Distinguished Service to Safety. His bibliography includes over 200 journal articles, and he is editor or coeditor of eight books. He has been on 14 editorial boards. Dr. Sheldon is a member of the Institute of Medicine. BLAINE C. WHITE, M.D., is the Director of Basic Science Research and a Professor of Emergency Medicine, Physiology, and Molecular Medicine at Wayne State University (WSU). Dr. White was designated a WSU Distinguished Scholar by the University Board of Governors in 1992, received the first Center for Excellence Grant from the Emergency Medicine Foundation and Genentech in 1993, was recipient of the American College of Emergency Physicians Award for Outstanding Contributions to Research and Education in 1988, and has received awards as an outstanding teacher from the medical students at both WSU and Michigan State University. As a member of the Graduate School faculty, he supervises the doctoral work performed in laboratories and is an investigator on an National Institutes of Health grant. Iom Project Staff ANDREW M. POPE, Ph.D., is the Director of the Health Sciences Policy Program at the Institute of Medicine. With expertise in physiology, toxicology, and epidemiology, his primary interests focus on environmental and occupational influences on human health. As a research fellow in the Division of Pharmacology and Toxicology at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Dr. Pope's research focused on the biochemical, neuroendocrine, and reproductive effects of various environmental substances on food-producing animals. During his tenure at the National Academy of Sciences and since 1989 at the Institute of Medicine, Dr. Pope has directed and edited numerous reports on environmental and occupational issues; topics include injury control, disability prevention, biologic markers, neurotoxicology, indoor allergens, and the inclusion of environmental and occupational health content in medical and nursing school curricula. GEOFFREY S. FRENCH is a Project Officer in the Health Sciences Policy Program. He has been with the Institute of Medicine (IOM) for 3 years, having supported the Office of Finance and Administration and the IOM committees that produced the reports Scientific Opportunities and Public Needs: Improving Priority Setting and Public Input at the National Institutes of Health, Enabling America: Assessing the Role of Rehabilitation Science and Engineering, and Halcion: An Independent Assessment of Safety and Efficacy Data. His undergraduate degree is in history and anthropology, and he completed his master's degree in national security studies at Georgetown University.

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CHARLES H. EVANS, JR., M.D., Ph.D., is the Head of the Health Sciences Section in the Institute of Medicine. Dr. Evans joined the staff of the Institute of Medicine in March 1998. As Head of the new Health Sciences Section, Dr. Evans has management responsibility for all scientific, administrative, and financial affairs of the Health Sciences Section, which includes the Health Sciences Policy Program and the Neuroscience and Behavioral Health Program and their respective boards in the Institute of Medicine. Dr. Evans is a pediatrician and immunologist and holds the rank of Captain (retired) in the U.S. Public Health Service with 27 years of service as a medical scientist at the National Institutes of Health. He received his B.S. (biology) degree from Union College in 1962 and M.D. and Ph.D. (microbiology) degrees from the University of Virginia in 1969. He was an intern and resident in pediatrics at the University of Virginia from 1969 to 1971 and from 1971 to 1998 served as a Medical Officer in the U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps and concurrently from 1976 to 1998 was Chief of the Tumor Biology Section at the National Cancer Institute. An expert in carcinogenesis and the normal immune system defenses to the development of cancer, he is the author of more than 250 scientific publications. He and his laboratory colleagues discovered the cytokine leukoregulin in 1983 and were awarded three U.S. patents. Dr. Evans has been active as an adviser to community medicine and higher education through his service on the Board of Trustees of Suburban Hospital Health System (1988 to present) and on the Arts and Sciences Alumni Council at the University of Virginia (1987 to 1997). He is the recipient of numerous scientific awards including the Outstanding Service Medal from the U.S. Public Health Service and the Wellcome Medal and Prize. Dr. Evans has been a member of the editorial boards of several scientific journals, has served on a variety of scientific advisory committees, and is a Fellow of the American Institute of Chemists and a credentialed Fellow in Health Systems Administration of the American Academy of Medical Administrators. KATHI E. HANNA, Ph.D., is a science and health policy consultant specializing in biomedical research policy, specifically, genetics, cancer, and reproductive technologies. Most recently, Dr. Hanna served as Senior Advisor to the National Bioethics Advisory Commission in its response to the president's request for recommendations regarding human cloning. Prior to that she was Senior Advisor to the President's Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans Illnesses, in which she assessed the effects of military service on the reproductive health of veterans. Dr. Hanna was a senior analyst at the congressional Office of Technology Assessment for 7 years and contributed to numerous science policy studies requested by committees of the U.S. Congress on biotechnology, human genetics, women's health, reproductive technologies, and bioethics. In 1989, Dr. Hanna spent a year at the Institute of Medicine where she edited a book about the interface between biomedical research and politics. In the past decade, Dr. Hanna has also served as a consultant to the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the National Institutes of Health, the Institute of Medicine, the Federation of American Societies of Experimental Biology, and several academic

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health centers. Prior to her work in Washington, D.C., Dr. Hanna was the Genetics Coordinator at Children's Memorial Hospital in Chicago. Dr. Hanna received an A.B. in biology from Lafayette College, an M.S. in human genetics from Sarah Lawrence College, and a doctorate from the School of Business and Public Management, George Washington University. SARAH PITLUCK, M.S. is an Administrative Assistant in the Health Sciences Policy Program of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and a Research Assistant for the IOM's Roundtable on Environmental Health Sciences, Research, and Medicine. She completed her undergraduate degree in political science at Washington University in St. Louis before completing her Master's degree in Public Policy and Public Administration at the London School of Economics and Political Science. Sarah's Masters thesis addresses the sources of divergent public policies toward prostate cancer screening in the United States and United Kingdom. GLEN SHAPIRO is a Project Assistant/Research Assistant in the Health Sciences Policy Program. As an undergraduate at Wesleyan University, Middletown, Connecticut, he completed a degree in Russian Language and Literature as well as fulfilled the premed requirements. MELVIN H. WORTH, JR., M.D., is a Scholar-in-Residence at the Institute of Medicine. Dr. Worth completed his surgery residency at New York University-Bellevue in 1961 and remained on that faculty for 18 years. He founded the Bellevue Trauma Service in 1966 and continued as Director until 1979, when he left to become Director of Surgery at the Staten Island University Hospital. He served for 15 years with the New York State Office of Professional Medical Conduct and 8 years as a member of the New York State Hospital Review and Planning Council (for which he was Chair in 1993). He is a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons, the American College of Gastroenterology, and the International Society for Surgery and holds memberships in the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma, the Society for Critical Care Medicine, the Association for Academic Surgery, New York Surgical Society (for which he was President in 1979), and other academic and professional organizations. Dr. Worth retains his appointment at New York University, and is Clinical Professor of Surgery at the State University of New York Downstate (Brooklyn) and the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences.