ROGER RANDALL DOUGAN REVELLE

March 7, 1909–July 15, 1991

BY THOMAS F. MALONE, EDWARD D. GOLDBERG,

AND WALTER H. MUNK

ROGER REVELLE WAS ONE of the twentieth century's most eminent scientists. His life's work personified Ernest Boyer's four categories of scholarship: discovery, integration, dissemination, and application of knowledge. He brought his talents in these categories to bear on the study of the planet we inhabit and our interaction with that planet. His interests and intellectual reach spanned the physical, biological, and social sciences, engineering, and the humanities. He enhanced the status of oceanography in world science, pioneered in the study of global warming, and brought a fresh approach to issues of population, world poverty, and hunger. Revelle was an inspiring leader of scientific enterprises and an insightful and sagacious educator. He was the intellectual architect for the creation of a great university. He excelled in the communication of science and its implications to policy makers and to the public. Revelle was an exemplary citizen in his community, his country, and the world.

ROOTS

Roger Revelle was born in Seattle on March 7, 1909, into a family of Huguenot descent on his father's side and Irish descent on his mother's side. His parents William Roger



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