Appendix G
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

David S. Kosson (chair) has a B.S. in chemical engineering, an M.S. in chemical and biochemical engineering, and a Ph.D. in chemical and biochemical engineering from Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. He joined the faculty at Rutgers in 1986 and was made an associate professor with tenure in 1990 and a full professor in 1996. He teaches graduate and undergraduate courses in chemical and environmental engineering and conducts research for the Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering on the development of microbial, chemical, and physical treatment methods for hazardous waste. He is responsible for project planning and coordination, from basic research through full-scale design and implementation. He has published extensively in the fields of chemical engineering, waste management and treatment, and contaminant fate and transport in soils and groundwater. Dr. Kosson has served on several Environmental Protection Agency advisory panels involved in waste research and is the director of the Physical Treatment Division of the Hazardous Substances Management Research Center in New Jersey. He is a member of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers and recently served as a member of the National Research Council Committee on Alternative Chemical Demilitarization Technologies.

Charles E. Kolb (vice chair) is president and chief executive officer of Aerodyne Research, Inc. Since 1971, his principal research interests at Aerodyne have included atmospheric and environmental chemistry, combustion chemistry, materials chemistry, and the chemical physics of rocket and aircraft exhaust plumes. He has served on several National Aeronautics and Space Administration panels dealing with atmospheric chemistry and global change, as well as on five National Research Council committees and boards dealing with environmental issues. From 1996 to 1999, he was atmospheric sciences editor for Geophysical Research Letters. In 1997, he received the Award for Creative Advances in Environmental Science and Technology from the American Chemical Society.

David H. Archer, a member of the National Academy of Engineering, has a Ph.D. in chemical engineering and mathematics from the University of Delaware. He is a retired consulting engineer with the Westinghouse Electric Company and is currently adjunct professor at Carnegie Mellon University. Dr. Archer has worked in both industry (at Westinghouse as an engineer, supervising engineer, department manager, and consulting engineer) and academia (at the University of Delaware and Carnegie Mellon University) for almost 10 years. He has considerable experience in research and management related to chemical engineering, as well as experience with combustion and plant management.

Piero M. Armenante has a Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the University of Virginia and is currently professor of chemical engineering at the New Jersey Institute of Technology. Dr. Armenante's research interests include multiphase mixing in agitated systems, the biological treatment of hazardous waste, industrial sterilization processes, and biomedical engineering. He has an extensive list of peer-reviewed and other publications and has administered numerous grants, studies, and projects.

Dennis C. Bley is president of Buttonwood Consulting, Inc., and a principal of The WreathWood Group, a



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Carbon Filtration for Reducing Emissions from Chemical Agent Incineration Appendix G Biographical Sketches of Committee Members David S. Kosson (chair) has a B.S. in chemical engineering, an M.S. in chemical and biochemical engineering, and a Ph.D. in chemical and biochemical engineering from Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. He joined the faculty at Rutgers in 1986 and was made an associate professor with tenure in 1990 and a full professor in 1996. He teaches graduate and undergraduate courses in chemical and environmental engineering and conducts research for the Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering on the development of microbial, chemical, and physical treatment methods for hazardous waste. He is responsible for project planning and coordination, from basic research through full-scale design and implementation. He has published extensively in the fields of chemical engineering, waste management and treatment, and contaminant fate and transport in soils and groundwater. Dr. Kosson has served on several Environmental Protection Agency advisory panels involved in waste research and is the director of the Physical Treatment Division of the Hazardous Substances Management Research Center in New Jersey. He is a member of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers and recently served as a member of the National Research Council Committee on Alternative Chemical Demilitarization Technologies. Charles E. Kolb (vice chair) is president and chief executive officer of Aerodyne Research, Inc. Since 1971, his principal research interests at Aerodyne have included atmospheric and environmental chemistry, combustion chemistry, materials chemistry, and the chemical physics of rocket and aircraft exhaust plumes. He has served on several National Aeronautics and Space Administration panels dealing with atmospheric chemistry and global change, as well as on five National Research Council committees and boards dealing with environmental issues. From 1996 to 1999, he was atmospheric sciences editor for Geophysical Research Letters. In 1997, he received the Award for Creative Advances in Environmental Science and Technology from the American Chemical Society. David H. Archer, a member of the National Academy of Engineering, has a Ph.D. in chemical engineering and mathematics from the University of Delaware. He is a retired consulting engineer with the Westinghouse Electric Company and is currently adjunct professor at Carnegie Mellon University. Dr. Archer has worked in both industry (at Westinghouse as an engineer, supervising engineer, department manager, and consulting engineer) and academia (at the University of Delaware and Carnegie Mellon University) for almost 10 years. He has considerable experience in research and management related to chemical engineering, as well as experience with combustion and plant management. Piero M. Armenante has a Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the University of Virginia and is currently professor of chemical engineering at the New Jersey Institute of Technology. Dr. Armenante's research interests include multiphase mixing in agitated systems, the biological treatment of hazardous waste, industrial sterilization processes, and biomedical engineering. He has an extensive list of peer-reviewed and other publications and has administered numerous grants, studies, and projects. Dennis C. Bley is president of Buttonwood Consulting, Inc., and a principal of The WreathWood Group, a

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Carbon Filtration for Reducing Emissions from Chemical Agent Incineration joint venture company that supports multidisciplinary research in human reliability. He has more than 25 years of experience in nuclear and electrical engineering, reliability and availability analysis, plant and human modeling for risk assessment, diagnostic system development, and technical management. Dr. Bley has a Ph.D. in nuclear engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and is a registered professional engineer in the state of California. He has served on a number of technical review panels for U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and U.S. Department of Energy programs and is a frequent lecturer in short courses for universities, industries, and government agencies. He is active in many professional organizations and is on the Board of Directors of the International Association for Probabilistic Safety Assessment and Management. Dr. Bley has published extensively on subjects related to risk assessment. His current research interests include applying risk analysis to diverse technological systems, modeling uncertainties in risk analysis and risk management, technical risk communication, and human reliability analysis. Frank P. Crimi is a part-time consultant and retired vice president of Lockheed Martin Advanced Environmental Systems Company. He has a B.S. in mechanical engineering from Ohio University and has done graduate work in mechanical engineering at Union College in Schenectady, New York. In addition to his appointment to the National Research Council Committee on Decontamination and Decommissioning of Uranium Enrichment Facilities, Mr. Crimi has firsthand knowledge and experience with radioactive and hazardous-waste treatment and disposal technologies. Elisabeth M. Drake, a member of the National Academy of Engineering, is the associate director of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Energy Laboratory. A chemical engineer with experience in risk management and technology associated with the transport, processing, storage, and disposal of hazardous materials, as well as chemical engineering process design and control systems, Dr. Drake has a special interest in the interactions between technology and the environment. She has often been a consultant to government and industry and has been active in the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, especially the Center for Chemical Process Safety. She belongs to a number of environmental organizations, including the Audubon Society, the Sierra Club, and Greenpeace. J. Robert Gibson is the assistant director of the Haskell Laboratory, E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Company, and an adjunct associate professor of marine studies at the University of Delaware. Since receiving his Ph.D. in physiology from Mississippi State University, Dr. Gibson has specialized in toxicology. He has been certified by the American Board of Toxicology and is the author of numerous publications. Michael R. Greenberg is a professor in the Department of Urban Studies and Community Health at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, and an adjunct professor of environmental and community medicine at the Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. His principal research and teaching interests include urbanization, industrialization, and environmental health policy. Dr. Greenberg holds a B.A. in mathematics and history, an M.A. in urban geography, and a Ph.D. in environmental and medical geography. Kathryn E. Kelly received her Ph.D. in public health from Columbia University, with a concentration in environmental toxicology. She is the founder and president of Delta Toxicology, Inc., in Crystal Bay, Nevada. Dr. Kelly has broad experience in toxicology, waste combustion, environmental policy, and risk communication. Richard S. Magee (chair from 7/94 to7/98) is a professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering and the Department of Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, and Environmental Science and the associate provost for research and development at the New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT). He also directs the Environmental Protection Agency's Northeast Hazardous Substance Research Center. He is a fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) and a diplomate of the American Academy of Environmental Engineers. Dr. Magee's research expertise is in combustion, with a focus on the incineration of municipal and industrial wastes. He has served as vice chairman of the ASME Research Committee on Industrial and Municipal Wastes and as a member of the United Nations Special Commission (under Security Council Resolution 687) Advisory Panel on Destruction of Iraq's Chemical Weapons Capabilities. He was recently a member of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Science Committee's Priority Area Panel on disarmament technologies and is presently a member of the NATO Science Committee's

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Carbon Filtration for Reducing Emissions from Chemical Agent Incineration Security-Related Civil Science and Technology Panel. He recently chaired the National Research Council Panel on Review and Evaluation of Alternative Chemical Disposal Technologies. James F. Mathis, a member of the National Academy of Engineering, graduated from the University of Wisconsin with a Ph.D. in chemical engineering. Dr. Mathis was vice president of science and technology for Exxon Corporation, where he was responsible for worldwide research and development programs, and chair of the New Jersey Commission on Science and Technology until his retirement in 1997. Dr. Mathis' expertise is in research and development and chemical engineering. Walter G. May has a B.S. in chemical engineering and an M.S. in chemistry from the University of Saskatchewan and a D.Sc. in chemical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He joined the faculty of the University of Saskatchewan as a professor of chemical engineering in 1943. In 1948, he began a distinguished career with Exxon Research and Engineering Company, where he was a senior science advisor from 1976 to 1983. From 1983 until his retirement in 1991, he was professor of chemical engineering at the University of Illinois, where he taught process design, thermodynamics, chemical reactor design, separation processes, and industrial chemistry and stoichiometry. Dr. May has published extensively, served on the editorial boards of Chemical Engineering Reviews and Chemical Engineering Progress, and has obtained numerous patents in his field. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a fellow of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, and the recipient of special awards from the American Institute of Chemical Engineers and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. He is also a registered professional engineer in the state of Illinois. Dr. May was a member of the National Research Council Committee on Alternative Chemical Demilitarization Technologies and the Committee on Decontamination and Decommissioning of the Uranium Diffusion Plants. Alvin H. Mushkatel, professor in the School of Planning and Landscape Architecture, Arizona State University, is an expert in emergency management risk perceptions. His research interests include emergency management, natural and technological hazards policy, and environmental policy. He has been a member of the National Research Council Committee on Earthquake Engineering, the Committee on Decontamination and Decommissioning of Uranium Enrichment Facilities, and the Panel on Review and Evaluation of Alternative Chemical Disposal Technologies. His most recent research has been focused on intergovernmental policy conflicts involving high-level nuclear-waste disposal and the role of citizens in decision-making processes. He has published extensively on issues related to the siting of hazardous waste facilities. H. Gregor Rigo attended Ohio University and earned his Ph.D. in mechanical and environmental engineering from the University of Illinois. He is currently president of Rigo & Rigo Associates, Inc., in Berea, Ohio. He has extensive experience in plant start-up, process and environmental engineering, and applied statistics focused on the use and control of emissions from nontraditional fuels; technical, environmental, and economic evaluations; and multipathway health risk assessments. Kozo Saito has a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from Seikei University in Tokyo and is currently professor of mechanical engineering in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Kentucky. Dr. Saito's expertise and experience are in experimental combustion studies, thermal sensing and control, and lean manufacturing and control. He is a member of the Combustion Institute, the American Society for Engineering Education, and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. Arnold F. Stancell, a member of the National Academy of Engineering, graduated from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology with a Sc.D. in chemical engineering. Dr. Stancell is currently a professor of chemical engineering at Georgia Institute of Technology and recently was visiting professor of chemical engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. For many years he worked for Mobil Oil, where he started in research and eventually became vice president of Mobil Chemical and then vice president in the crude oil and natural gas business, both domestic and international. He was responsible for a $5 billion per year business with 5,000 employees. Dr. Stancell's expertise is in the management of large businesses, including chemical operations.

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Carbon Filtration for Reducing Emissions from Chemical Agent Incineration Chadwick A. Tolman received his Ph.D. in physical chemistry from the University of California at Berkeley and is currently a program officer in organic and macromolecular chemistry in the Division of Chemistry at the National Science Foundation. He has extensive experience and expertise in chemistry and chemical process development. Dr. Tolman spent 31 years in Central Research at the DuPont Experimental Station. His work has spanned a broad range of subject areas, including hydrocarbon oxidation, organometallic chemistry, and the destruction of toxic organic compounds in wastewater. William Tumas is currently the group leader for the Waste Treatment and Minimization Science and Technology Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory. He is a senior chemist known primarily for his work in science and engineering research on waste treatment and minimization. His work has included research and technology development for industrial-waste applications and environmental restoration for the U.S. Department of Energy. At Los Alamos, he has studied supercritical fluids, oxidation, and organic transformations. He has written numerous papers and is a member of several professional organizations. In addition, Dr. Tumas was recently a member of the National Research Council Panel on Review and Evaluation of Alternative Chemical Disposal Technologies.