Disposition of High-Level Radioactive Waste through Geological Isolation

Development, Current Status, and Technical and Policy Challenges

Discussion Paper Prepared for the Workshop to be Held at the Arnold and Mabel Beckman Center of the National Academies, Irvine, California on November 4–5, 1999

Steering Committee

Board on Radioactive Waste Management

Commission on Geosciences, Environment, and Resources

National Research Council

NATIONAL ACADEMY PRESS
Washington, D.C.



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page R1
--> Disposition of High-Level Radioactive Waste through Geological Isolation Development, Current Status, and Technical and Policy Challenges Discussion Paper Prepared for the Workshop to be Held at the Arnold and Mabel Beckman Center of the National Academies, Irvine, California on November 4–5, 1999 Steering Committee Board on Radioactive Waste Management Commission on Geosciences, Environment, and Resources National Research Council NATIONAL ACADEMY PRESS Washington, D.C.

OCR for page R1
--> This discussion paper was developed for the November 4-5, 1999, workshop entitled Disposition of High-Level Radioactive Waste Through Geological Isolation: Development, Current Status, and Technical and Policy Challenges, and has not been subject to the National Research Council’s report review process, and should not be cited as a National Research Council report. International Standard Book Number 0-309-06778-2 Copies of this discussion paper are available from: National Academy Press 2101 Constitution Avenue, NW Box 285 Washington, DC 20055 800-624-6242 202-334-3313 (in the Washington metropolitan area) http://www.nap.edu Copyright 1999 by the National Academies. All rights reserved. Printed in the United States of America.

OCR for page R1
--> PROJECT STEERING COMMITTEE D. WARNER NORTH, Chair, NorthWorks, Inc., Belmont, California CHARLES McCOMBIE, Vice-Chair, International Consultant, Wettingen, Switzerland JOHN F. AHEARNE, Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Society, and Duke University, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina ROBERT J. BUDNITZ, Future Resources Associates, Inc., Berkeley, California LARS O. ERICSSON, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden PETER FRITZ, Environmental Research Center Leipzig-Halle, Leipzig, Germany ROGER E. KASPERSON, Clark University, Worcester, Massachusetts JANE C. S. LONG, University of Nevada, Reno GHISLAIN de MARSILY, University of Paris, France CLAIRE M. MAYS, Institut Symlog, Cachan, France NIKOLAY P. LAVEROV, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia ATSUYUKI SUZUKI, University of Tokyo, Japan Staff JOHN R. WILEY, Study Director SUSAN B. MOCKLER, Research Associate TONI GREENLEAF, Administrative Associate ANGELA R. TAYLOR, Senior Project Assistant LAURA D. LLANOS, Project Assistant

OCR for page R1
This page in the original is blank.

OCR for page R1
--> Preface During the next several years, decisions are expected to be made in several countries on the further development and implementation of the geological disposition option. The Board on Radioactive Waste Management (BRWM) of the U.S. National Academies believes that informed and reasoned discussion of relevant scientific, engineering and social issues can—and should—play a constructive role in the decision process by providing information to decision makers on relevant technical and policy issues. A BRWM-initiated project including a workshop at Irvine, California on November 4–5, 1999, and subsequent National Academies' report to be published in spring, 2000, are intended to provide such information to national policy makers both in the U.S. and abroad. To inform national policies, it is essential that experts from the physical, geological, and engineering sciences, and experts from the policy and social science communities work together. Some national programs have involved social science and policy experts from the beginning, while other programs have only recently recognized the importance of this collaboration. An important goal of the November workshop is to facilitate dialogue between these communities, as well as to encourage the sharing of experiences from many national programs. The workshop steering committee has prepared this discussion for participants at the workshop. It should elicit critical comments and help identify topics requiring in-depth discussion at the workshop. It is not intended as a statement of findings, conclusions, or recommendations. It is rather intended as a vehicle for stimulating dialogue among the workshop participants. Out of that dialogue will emerge the findings, conclusions, and recommendations of the National Academies' report.

OCR for page R1
This page in the original is blank.

OCR for page R1
--> Contents     Management of High-Level Waste: A Historical Overview of the Technical and Policy Challenges   1     What Is High-Level Nuclear Waste? A Brief History,   2     The Quantity of High-Level Waste To Be Managed,   4     Assuring the Safety of a Geological Repository for High-Level Waste,   5     Achieving Public Acceptance of High-Level Waste Repositories,   8     Alternatives to a Geological Repository,   10     Disposal vs. Disposition,   11     Safety against Human Intrusion,   12     The Evolving Balance between International and National Efforts,   13     An Overview of the Workshop Agenda   15     Plenary Sessions,   15     Arrangements and Topics for Discussion Sessions,   16     Key Issues for the Workshop,   16     Description of the Discussion Sessions,   18     Conclusion,   32     Bibliography   33

OCR for page R1
This page in the original is blank.