APPENDIX D

INTERVIEW PROTOCOL AND QUESTIONNAIRE

INTERVIEW PROTOCOL USED IN EVALUATING THE TWO DRAFT SAFETY LABELS SHOWN IN FIGURE 5-2

  1. Suppose that the government requires that a safety label must be placed on the windows of all new cars sold in the United States. The year is 1997 and you are helping someone shop for a new car. You are looking at a new 1997 compact car called the XYZ300. Here is the label that appears on the window. I'll ask you to read it carefully in a minute, but first, just glance at it quickly and tell me your first impressions.

  2. Now, starting right at the top, please read the label to me out loud. As you go along, tell me anything you are thinking, anything at all that comes to mind. Tell me what you like and don't like about the label. What things are clear and understandable? What things do you find confusing, poorly worded?

    If it gets quiet: What are you thinking? or Please tell me what you're thinking. or Talk to me.

    When they get to the diagrams, if they don't offer it on their own: Please explain the diagram to me. What is it saying? What is your reaction to it?

  3. If you were going to give advice to the people who designed this label, what would you tell them needs work? What changes would you suggest to make the label more useful to the average American car buyer?

  4. Administer the demographic questions.



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OCR for page 154
Shopping for Safety: Providing Consumer Automotive Safety Information APPENDIX D INTERVIEW PROTOCOL AND QUESTIONNAIRE INTERVIEW PROTOCOL USED IN EVALUATING THE TWO DRAFT SAFETY LABELS SHOWN IN FIGURE 5-2 Suppose that the government requires that a safety label must be placed on the windows of all new cars sold in the United States. The year is 1997 and you are helping someone shop for a new car. You are looking at a new 1997 compact car called the XYZ300. Here is the label that appears on the window. I'll ask you to read it carefully in a minute, but first, just glance at it quickly and tell me your first impressions. Now, starting right at the top, please read the label to me out loud. As you go along, tell me anything you are thinking, anything at all that comes to mind. Tell me what you like and don't like about the label. What things are clear and understandable? What things do you find confusing, poorly worded? If it gets quiet: What are you thinking? or Please tell me what you're thinking. or Talk to me. When they get to the diagrams, if they don't offer it on their own: Please explain the diagram to me. What is it saying? What is your reaction to it? If you were going to give advice to the people who designed this label, what would you tell them needs work? What changes would you suggest to make the label more useful to the average American car buyer? Administer the demographic questions.

OCR for page 154
Shopping for Safety: Providing Consumer Automotive Safety Information Here is a different design that might be used for the label on that same compact car, the XYZ300. I'd like you to evaluate it in the same way you did the first one. Start by glancing at it quickly and tell me your first impressions. Now, starting right at the top, please read the label to me out loud. As you go along, tell me anything you are thinking, anything at all that comes to mind. Tell me what you like and don't like about the label. What things are clear and understandable? What things do you find confusing, poorly worded? If it gets quiet: What are you thinking? or Please tell me what you're thinking. or Talk to me. When they get to the diagrams, if they don't offer it on their own: Please explain the diagram to me. What is it saying? What is your reaction to it? Once again, if you were going to give advice to the people who designed this label, what would you tell them needs work? What changes would you suggest to make the label more useful to the average American car buyer? Now here are the two labels together. I'd like you to compare them for me. Tell me which are the best and poorest features of each. If you were going to give the designers some advice for their next label design, what features would you use from each? Are there any things missing that you'd like to see? Are there any things that you think are unnecessary and could be left out? Administer the written questionnaire. WRITTEN QUESTIONNAIRE USED IN EVALUATING THE TWO DRAFT SAFETY LABELS SHOWN IN FIGURE 5-2 Did the labels you saw agree or disagree concerning how safe the 1997 XYZ300 is? __ Agree __ Disagree

OCR for page 154
Shopping for Safety: Providing Consumer Automotive Safety Information Please answer the questions below based on the second label you looked at: Is the 1997 XYZ300 typically safer than all other 1997 vehicles? __ Yes __ No __ Couldn't tell from label __ Don't remember Is the 1997 XYZ300 typically safer than all other 1997 compact cars? __ Yes __ No __ Couldn't tell from label __ Don't remember According to the label, could a 1997 XYZ300 be safer than a typical 1997 car, van, or light truck? __ Yes __ No __ Couldn't tell from label __ Don't remember Please list the crash avoidance features that were mentioned on the label, and describe the XYZ300 with regard to those features, to the best of your ability. Which crash avoidance feature or features would you pay most attention to if you were purchasing a car? What is the single thing that makes the most difference in determining the risk of an auto accident?